Showing posts with label Ayurvedic Medicine. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Ayurvedic Medicine. Show all posts

Ayurvedic Treatment for Allergies



    Allergies are a doshic response to a specific allergen, such as pollen, dust, chemicals on a rug, ragweed, or any strong chemical scent, according to Ayurvedic samprapti (pathogenesis). 


    3 Types Of Allergic Responses 


    • Vata Allergies 

    • Stomach bloating, gastric pain, and even intestinal colic are symptoms of Vata-type allergies.
    • Wheezing, sneezing, headaches, ringing in the ears, and sleeplessness are all symptoms of a vata allergy. 
    • Some people, for example, develop wheezing when they are exposed to dust or pollen. The wheezing is caused by the vata dosha constricting the bronchial tree. 
    • Insomnia and other vata-related symptoms may also be present. 

    • Pitta Allergies  

    • Pitta dosha is already present beneath the skin in a pitta allergy. 
    • When a person comes into touch with an allergen, such as chemicals, ragweed, or some synthetic materials, the pitta enters through the capillaries and causes a rash, itching, hives, urticaria, allergic dermatitis, or eczema, which are all pitta-type allergic responses. 

    • Kapha Allergy 

    • During the spring season, when plants and trees release pollen into the air, kapha allergies are common. 
    • When pollens, such as juniper or any other pollen, are breathed, they irritate the delicate mucous membrane in the nasal-respiratory tube, causing hay fever, colds, congestion, cough, sinus infection, and even asthma in certain individuals. 


    To effectively treat allergies, we must first determine if they are vata, pitta, or kapha in nature. Then we'll be able to decide on a specific treatment plan. 


    • Your prakruti (constitution) forecasts your allergy proneness in the majority of instances, maybe 80% of the time. 
    • That is, there is typically a link between an individual's constitution and the kind of allergic response they have. 
    • When the vikruti, or present state of the system, reveals a pitta imbalance, a person with pitta prakruti is more likely to develop a pitta allergic response. 
    • However, a kapha individual may have a vata imbalance owing to food, environmental circumstances, emotional issues, or other variables, and so on. 



    VATA-TYPE ALLERGIES AND THEIR TREATMENT 


    BASTI  

    • A dashamoola tea basti is one of the most effective treatments for vata-type allergies (enema). 
    • To prepare a tea, steep 1 tablespoon of the herbal compound dashamoola in 1 pint of water for 5 minutes. Cool the liquid, filter it, and use it as an enema.
    • This dashamoola tea basti may help with vata symptoms including wheezing, sneezing, dryness of the throat, dryness of the colon leading to distension, constipation, and abdominal pain. 


    HERBAL REMEDIES 


    • Use the following herbal formula: ashwagandha 1 component balancing 1 vidari, 
    • To alleviate vata allergies, mix these herbs in equal proportions and take 14 teaspoon of the powder 3 times a day, washed down with warm water.
    • To calm a severe wheezing condition, prepare one cup of ginger or licorice tea by boiling 1 teaspoon of the herb in 1 cup of water for approximately 3 minutes. 
    • After that, add 5 to 10 drops of mahanarayan oil, stir well, and drink one sip every 10 to 15 minutes. (If you don't have mahanarayan oil, use 12 teaspoon normal ghee instead.) 



    PITTA-TYPE ALLERGIES AND THEIR TREATMENT 


    HERBAL REMEDIES 


    • This herbal mixture is effective for pitta pacification: 8 components of shatavari dudha kama 1 part shanka bhasma, 12 parts guduchi 14th part 12 teaspoon of this combination, mixed with a little warm water, should be taken 2 or 3 times a day after meals. 
    • Apply neem oil or tikta ghrita (bitter ghee) to the skin if you have hives, rash, urticaria, dermatitis, or eczema. 


    PURIFICATION OF THE BLOOD 


    Individuals with high pitta, who are prone to acquiring pitta-type issues such as sunburn during the summer season, should perform rakta moksha, or bloodletting, before the summer season begins, according to Ayurveda. 


    • Despite the fact that this technique is not well-regarded in the West, it is nevertheless extensively used in India since it has proved to be an effective preventative and therapeutic strategy. 
    • To put it to good use right now, consider donating 12 pints (100 cc) of blood to a blood bank. This will aid in the relief of pitta-related diseases including allergic dermatitis and allergic eczema. 

    A blood-cleansing herbal combination may be used to have a similar effect. 


    • Mix equal parts of the herbs manjistha and neem, for example. neem 1 part manjistha 1 component After meals, take 12 teaspoon of this combination with warm water three times a day. It will purify the blood and aid in the recovery of pitta-type allergies. 
    • Burdock, a popular Western plant, is an effective blood purifier; prepare a tea with 12 teaspoon burdock per cup of boiling water and drink it 2 or 3 times each day. 



    KAPHA-TYPE ALLERGIES AND THEIR TREATMENT 


    HERBAL REMEDIES


    • Respiratory pulmonary congestion, cough, cold, asthma, or hay fever are common symptoms of kapha allergies. 
    • Use the herbal formula below to get relief from these symptoms: 4 components of sitopaladi 4 sections of yashti madhu abrak bhasma 18th part Take a quarter teaspoon of this combination with honey three times a day. 


    PURGATION THERAPY.

     

    • Excess kapha builds up in the stomach and lungs, causing kapha-type allergies. 
    • Purgation treatment is one method to alleviate congestion (virechana). 
    • Take 1 teaspoon of flaxseed oil (available in most natural food shops) 2 or 3 times a day for 2 or 3 days. 
    • This is going to be really effective. You may also utilize triphala.


    VOMITING THERAPY


    • Vamana, or vomiting treatment, is an Ayurvedic therapy that is especially effective for eliminating excess kapha from the stomach and respiratory system. 
    • However, I've observed that there is a significant cultural prejudice against vomiting in the West, and many individuals seem to be especially uncomfortable with this process. 
    • It is not only physically repulsive, but it may also be emotionally difficult, since some emotional puri cation may follow from the physical puri cation. 
    • So, if you're prone to strong emotions or have difficulty coping with them, you may want to avoid using vamana. 
    • If you wish to give it a try—and I want to stress that it is extremely effective for removing excess kapha—drink a stomach full of licorice tea and salt water, then vomit it, emptying the stomach. Begin by consuming several cups of licorice tea, followed by a pint of water with approximately 1 teaspoon of salt. 
    • Drink till your stomach hurts, then touch the back of your tongue and vomit. 


    WARNING
    : Do not use vaman treatment if you have high blood pressure, low blood pressure, hiatal hernia, or a history of cardiac issues. 



    ALLERGY HEALING INSTRUCTIONS FOR ALL TYPES OF ALLERGIES 



    TRIPHALA


    Take 12 to 1 teaspoon of triphala at night for all three kinds of allergies. 

    • Triphala is a laxative as well as a purgative. 
    • Amalaki, bibhitaki, and haritaki are the three herbs that make up this formula. 
    • Haritaki is good for the vata dosha, amalaki is good for the pitta dosha, and bibhitaki is good for the kapha dosha. 


    CHANGES IN DIET. 


    • Follow a vata-soothing diet for vata allergies, a pitta-pacifying diet for pitta allergies, and a kapha-reducing diet for kapha allergies. 


    WATCH YOUR FOOD COMBINATIONS. 


    • Individuals with allergies should avoid dietary pairings that are incompatible, such as milk and yogurt, meat and dairy, chicken and dairy, melon and grains, or fruits and grains. 
    • Banana milkshakes and milk-based "fruit smoothies" should be avoided. Please refer to a more comprehensive list of food incompatibilities. 


    GET AWAY FROM THE CAUSE. 


    • Most allergies should be avoided by avoiding the direct cause: the allergen. 
    • Cats, dogs, hair, pollen, mold, and other animals that cause allergies should be avoided at all costs.
    • Also, avoid synthetic fibers like polyester and rayon, which may trigger pitta-type skin sensitivities. Cotton clothing is recommended. 
    • Because of the huge amount of pesticides sprayed on cotton, you may want to stick to organic cotton goods, even if they are more costly. 


    ALLERGENS MUST BE BLOCKED. 


    • The respiratory route is often exposed to dust and other allergens. 
    • Ghee lubrication of the nasal mucous membrane is one method to reduce the effect of allergens that you can't avoid. 
    • This prevents the allergen from coming into close touch with the mucosal membrane. 


    NEEM OIL SHOULD BE USED. 


    • Applying neem oil to the exposed area of the body is another method to minimize or prevent the effects of environmental allergies. 
    • Because of the oil's presence on the skin, as well as neem's disinfecting qualities, contact with the allergen is reduced. 


    NOTE: Use neem herbalized oil, which is made from neem leaves boiled in a sesame or other oil basis. Neem extract in its purest form will be too potent. If even this herbalized neem oil is too powerful for you and causes itching or burning, dilute it with half and half coconut oil. 


    MEDITATION FOR STRESS RELIEF 


    • The majority of allergies are caused by stress. 
    • Stress creates an imbalance in the mind and body. 
    • Empty Bowl meditation is a kind of meditation that helps to restore equilibrium and, as a result, may assist with stress-related allergies.  


    YOGA POSTURES 


    • The Sun Salutation is the most beneficial yoga asana for kapha and vata allergies. 
    • Do the Moon Salutation if you have pitta allergies. 


    EXERCISES IN BREATHING 


    • For respiratory allergies including hay fever, wheezing, and sneezing, alternate nostril breathing is effective. 
    • Bhastrika (Breath of Fire) is beneficial for kapha-type allergies. 
    • In addition, ujjayi pranayama boosts immunity and is beneficial for allergies of all kinds.


    You may also want to read more about Ayurveda and Holistic Healing here.



    Ayurvedic Self Massage



    Abhyanga (warm oil self-massage) is an important part of Ayurveda, since it nourishes the body, calms the mind, and soothes the spirit. 


    This simple massage, done every morning before showering, can help to balance your doshas and remove any toxins that have built up overnight. 


    BENEFITS 

    Massage relieves stress and improves circulation while cultivating self-acceptance. 

    Sesame oil lubricates, heals, and softens the skin and deep tissues.

    TIME

    5–10 minutes each day, preferably in the morning. 


    ITEMS

    3–5 tsp cured sesame oil (curing is a specific heating procedure that increases the oil's strength); a towel


    INSTRUCTIONS


    1. Warm a little amount of oil in your hands by gently rubbing your palms together. Begin by rubbing the oil into your neck, shoulders, and chest region using your palms and fingertips in short, circular motions. 
    2. Focus on your arms, hands, and fingers, as well as your belly, lower back, and buttocks. Maintain a steady rhythm with your strokes. Take additional oil if necessary. 
    3. Continue massaging the front and back of your thighs, lower legs, and tips of your feet down your torso. You shouldn't oil your feet's soles since you may slide in the shower. 
    4. Allow your skin to absorb the oil by sitting on a towel in a chair for approximately 5 minutes. Inhale deeply and slowly through your nose, then exhale slowly and deeply through your mouth. Shower as usual, but just use a little amount of shower gel to avoid washing away all of the oil. 



    You may also want to read more about Ayurveda and Holistic Healing here.



    Ayurvedic Self Care - Importance Of Forgiveness



    Forgiving yourself and others may be a very therapeutic activity. 

    Harboring on to anger or holding grudges, according to Ayurveda, may lead to a buildup of toxic ama in our bodies. 


    This letter-writing process gives you the opportunity to recognize and then let go of your pain and anger, releasing any bad energy that has been stored in your body. 


    BENEFITS 

    Reduces the weight of a grudge; relieves sorrow and tension; gives a feeling of comfort; fosters optimism. 


    TIME 

    Approximately 20 minutes, or as long as you need. It may be done as many times as necessary. 


    CAUTION 

    As emotions are released, you may feel worse at first. These emotions should pass, but if they don't, you should seek professional help. 


    PREPARATION 


    Breathe gently and deeply to focus your thoughts. Inhale for 5 counts with your nose, then exhale for 5 counts through your mouth. Rep 3 times more. 


    1. Consider who you'd want to write to and why. Make a list of any emotions, thoughts, or phrases that come to mind. 
    2. Use your notes as a starting point for drafting your message. Instead of using harsh words or making accusations, try to describe how the event has impacted you. 
    3. Ask the recipient for forgiveness at the end of your letter. Now read your letter from beginning to end, paying attention to how you feel. 
    4. Finish the ceremony by ripping up or burning your letter in a safe manner. 
    5. Visualize your bad feelings dissipating as the words fade away.


    You may also want to read more about Ayurveda and Holistic Healing here.



    Ayurvedic Self Care For Fatigue And Improving Energy Levels



    Many of us are tired and lacking in energy as a result of the pressures and expectations of contemporary, fast-paced living. 

    Low energy is typically the consequence of an overabundance in one of the doshas, according to Ayurveda. 

    Mental weariness is caused by vata, emotional fatigue by pitta, and bodily fatigue by kapha imbalance. 

    You may find that the following typical symptoms linked with each dosha disruption seem more severe if you have more of a specific dosha's characteristics in your own constitution. 


    Vata Balancing


    • Vata excess may make you mentally exhausted, disoriented, and unable to concentrate. 
    • Eat a vata-balancing diet rich in fats and grains, as well as warm, soupy meals, to combat this. 
    • To avoid vata fatigue, do yoga in the evening  to quiet and cleanse your mind, and limit your screen time. 


    Kapha Balancing 


    • Physically, you may have an overabundance of kapha, leaving you tired and unable to move much. You may quickly get out of breath if you do. 
    • To combat kapha's sluggishness, get up early in the morning when vata, the energy of activity, is at its most potent. 
    • Eat lighter, less oily meals like beans, lentils, and leafy green vegetables to combat kapha's heaviness. 
    • A morning massage with warming cedar oil  may also help balance the chilly, thick characteristics of kapha. 


    Pitta Balancing


    • Your symptoms may manifest in your emotions, such as becoming easily annoyed, if you have too much pitta. 
    • When you're feeling this way, stay away from pungent and sour meals; their pitta characteristics can only exacerbate your symptoms. 
    • To help you control, evaluate, and manage your emotions, try journaling  and massaging yourself with a cooling oil. 
    • To help moderate pitta's sour characteristics, drink warm water flavored with sweet fennel and cardamom seeds throughout the day.


    You may also want to read more about Ayurveda and Holistic Healing here.



    Ayurvedic Self Care - Importance Of Self Love



    Ayurveda emphasizes the significance of connecting with your real self and learning to accept yourself completely. Only then will you be able to properly nourish yourself in order to attain holistic health. 


    When we are continually inundated with images and ideals of perfection, which may lead to self-criticism and poor self-worth, the ancient Ayurvedic teaching of self-love is particularly important today. 


    These emotions are often connected to health issues like anxiety and depression, so addressing them is critical for your long-term well-being. 


    Try these easy ways to boost your self-esteem: 


    Get up early. 

    1. When the characteristics of lightness, mobility, and emotional sensitivity of the vata dosha are most prominent, wisdom and inner knowledge are more easily accessible before dawn. 
    2. You may approach yourself with more compassion when you connect with these components of vata's energy. 

    Take care of yourself. 

    1. Taking time each day for silence can help you connect more vividly to your real self. You may also try meditating to strengthen this bond. 
    2. Unplug Excess vata dosha, which may cause anxiety, can be caused by sensory overload. 
    3. During the day, and a few hours before bed, turn off your gadgets if feasible. 
    4. You will be less judgmental of yourself and able to give yourself more compassion if you are less nervous. 

    Spend time in the great outdoors. 

    1. When we can harmonize with nature and the components found in all three doshas, we are at our healthiest. 
    2. This helps you find a deeper sense of self-acceptance by increasing ojas (immunity), decreasing self-criticism, and restoring vital life energy (prana).


    You may also want to read more about Ayurveda and Holistic Healing here.



    Ayurvedic Self Care - Tongue Scraping



    Tongue scraping is an Ayurvedic technique for removing poisons from the tongue and therefore avoiding sickness and disease. Toxins are removed by scraping the tongue. 

    It also allows you to completely appreciate your meals throughout the day. 


    • Most individuals have some dirt on their tongue when they wake up, but a thick coating is a symptom of ama in the system. 
    • Ama is a sticky waste product that results from inadequate digestion. 
    • When agni is weak or overwhelmed by the incorrect meals, it builds up in the digestive system. 
    • If ama isn't adequately cleansed, it builds up and circulates throughout the body, ultimately settling in areas and creating obstructions in the srotamsi (energy channels) and unbalancing the doshas. 
    • This may result in a disease known as Amavisha in Sanskrit, which is a persistent accumulation of poisons. 
    • After eating, Amavisha may produce a heaviness and fogginess in the head, stiffness in the joints, and a drowsy, dull sensation. 


    Ayurvedic Technique To Detox The Tongue



    Tongue scraping not only eliminates toxins, but it also removes any hidden bacteria, such as streptococcus, so they don't reintroduce themselves into the system and create illnesses. 

    Scraping the taste buds also helps to reactivate them by removing the layer that dulls their sensitivity. 


    1. Before brushing your teeth in the morning and evening, you should scrape your tongue. 
    2. Use a scraper made of stainless steel or copper, which may be found at any reputable pharmacy or health shop. 
    3. Stick out your tongue and allow it to become heavy and relaxed, then quietly count to five while scraping the surface of the tongue backward and forth. 
    4. Repeat with the scraper after rinsing it. 
    5. When you're done, wash your scraper with water and let it dry naturally before rinsing your mouth. 
    6. Brush your teeth as usual, then sip a small glass of warm water to help your digestive system relax. 


    You may also want to read more about Ayurveda and Holistic Healing here.



    Ayurveda for Treating Addictions

     




    Why do individuals become addicted?

    People who are addicted, in most cases (with the exception of terrible scenarios such as kids born hooked due to their mother's addiction), begin by just seeking more pleasure and satisfaction in their lives. Their lives are complicated and miserable; their relationships may be difficult and unfulfilling; they may be dissatisfied and pressured at work; and they just don't know what to do. 

    As a result, individuals turn to drugs or alcohol to avoid the reality of their situation. Whether the addictive drug is cigarettes, marijuana, alcohol, or something else, it quickly becomes a chemical reliance rather than a psychological escape. 

    The person's brain therefore fails to function correctly unless a particular level of the addictive chemical is present in the blood.

    Treatment is determined on the severity and duration of the addiction. A person with a weaker addiction, such as a recent smoking habit, may be able to easily cease. When a chronic alcoholic suddenly quits drinking, however, alcohol withdrawal syndrome develops, which is difficult to manage.

     

    Detox and Cleanse

    It is critical to undergo panchakarma, an effective Ayurvedic cleaning and detox treatment, to effectively tackle the problem of addiction. Panchakarma therapies are available in an Ayurvedic clinic, as well as a through a home panchakarma regimen.


    REDUCTION OF THE DOSE

    Reduce the dosage of the addictive chemical as part of this cleaning treatment. According to Ayurveda, it is not a good idea to entirely quit taking the addictive chemical all at once unless powerful treatments to cope with withdrawal are available, otherwise a stressful withdrawal syndrome would most likely ensue.

    • We must strengthen the an effected organs in the case of nicotine toxicity (which affects the lungs and cardiovascular system) and alcohol toxicity (which affects the liver).


    Use the following recipe to treat alcohol toxicity:


    3 parts of chitrak 3 parts of kutki 3 times a day, take 12 teaspoon of these herbs with 2 tablespoons of aloe vera juice.

    A bitter wine derived from aloe vera juice is recommended by Ayurveda. (It's known as kumari asava.)

    A person who is addicted to alcohol can consume modest amounts of this mild, dry wine instead of strong liquor or other alcoholic drinks.

    • 4 teaspoons diluted in an equal quantity of water is a good starting point. Then, while utilizing the aforementioned herbal formula to strengthen the injured liver, gradually lower the amount of herbal wine in the dosage.



    Use the following recipe to treat tobacco toxicity:


    Remove one-third to one-half of the tobacco from each cigarette (light at the end), then fill the paper with a mixture of rose petals, brahmi, and jatamamsi for a nicotine addict (equal proportions). 

    Smoke until the tobacco begins to burn. Put out the cigarette as soon as the tobacco begins to burn.


    NASAL MEDICINE

    Nicotine toxicity is reduced by doing nasya with brahmi ghee.


    EXERCISE

    When a person has a strong urge to drink or smoke, he or she should usually go for a stroll in the fresh air.



    WHEN TO GO SEE THE DOCTOR


    If a person has a severe alcohol addiction and gets headaches, tremors, sleepiness, depression, or other alcohol withdrawal symptoms after they quit drinking, they should consult a doctor soon. 

    Also, go for a swim, or do some other type of exercise to destress and vent excessive anxiety.



    STIMULATION OF THE APPETITE


    Some individuals drink because they don't have enough food to eat. They never feel hungry unless they have a drink.

    Instead of drinking alcohol, individuals can drink ginger tea to enhance their appetite. 


    Alternatively, try this tea recipe to activate Agni, the digestive fire:


    • 1 quart water Agni Tea 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper 12 handful ginger root, chopped 2 tblsp Sucanat (or other sugar substitute) a teaspoon of rock salt (between 18 and 12 teaspoons) 
    • In a saucepan, combine all of the ingredients and bring to a boil for 20 minutes.
    • Remove the saucepan from the heat and set it aside to cool for a few minutes before adding the juice of half a lime. Lime juice should not be cooked.


    ASANAS IN YOGA. 

    • Some yoga movements would be beneficial as well. 
    • Sun Salutations and alternate nostril breathing should be added. 
    • Meditation in the So-Hum style will also be beneficial.




    You may also want to read more about Ayurveda and Holistic Healing here.









    Ayurvedic Healing Pastes for Your Skin


     

    Ayurveda Pastes to Heal Your Skin:


    Here are three pastes you may manufacture and use on your skin at home. They have the potential to be effective in the treatment of acne.


    1.       Make a paste out of 1 teaspoon chickpea flour (available at Indian grocery stores and natural food stores) and enough water to cleanse your face with it.

    2.       After rinsing, use one of the following methods: Make a paste using almond powder and a little water and apply it to your face. Allow it to dry and stay on your skin for up to 30 minutes before rinsing it off. (You may manufacture your own almond powder in a coffee or nut grinder.)

    3.       A paste made from sandalwood and turmeric powders with goat's milk is skin-healing. To prepare a paste, combine 14 teaspoon turmeric and 12 teaspoon sandalwood powder, then add sufficient goat's milk. Make a mask out of this mixture and apply it to your face.

     

    Note that your skin will seem yellow for up to 5 days, however this combination is quite effective in treating acne.



    You may also want to read more about Ayurveda and Holistic Healing here.











    Ayurvedic Home Remedy for Acne

     



    Spots and pimples are frequently associated with pitta dosha and rakta (blood) issues in Ayurveda. Taming fiery pitta and clearing the blood of toxins are the keys to controlling these often-distressing illnesses.


    • Excess pitta can cause spots, discomfort, and redness when it circulates in the circulation and accumulates in the outer layer of the skin.
    • Acne patients are frequently prescribed oral and topical antibiotics, as well as steroid skin treatments, in conventional treatment.
    • Antibiotics can alter the delicate balance of your natural gut flora when used for lengthy periods of time, while steroids impair the skin's structure.

    Ayurvedic therapies, which focus on decreasing pitta dosha and cleansing the blood, can be particularly successful for milder forms of acne and infrequent outbreaks.


    1. Cleanse Blood: Toxins must be removed from the bloodstream through proper digestion. Asparagus, cucumber, and leafy greens are all relaxing, pitta-reducing meals.
    2. Warm water flavored with a generous squeeze of lime juice, which is abundant in antioxidants, can also help clean the blood. Control your dairy consumption.
    3. Dairy can be consumed in moderation, but it should not be combined with foods that are incompatible.
    4. When eating dairy with fruit or fish, pitta is increased. Hard cheese is tamasic, which means it causes heaviness and sleepiness. This can lead to incorrect digestion, which can lead to further breakouts.
    5. Relax and unwind. Stress can also cause or aggravate spots and acne due to an overabundance of pitta dosha.

    Paste for healing


    This therapy will reduce inflammation and is prepared with soothing sandalwood, turmeric, and rosewater.

    1. Mix half a teaspoon of gram(chickpea) flour with half a teaspoon of sandalwood powder and a sprinkle of turmeric powder.
    2. Stir in a few drops of rosewater to make a smooth paste.
    3. Apply to the skin's afflicted regions and leave for 10 minutes.
    4. Rinse your skin gently and wipe dry with a clean cloth. Remove any residue with a cotton pad soaked in rosewater.



    You may also want to read more about Ayurveda and Holistic Healing here.












    Ayurvedic Recipe for Balancing Cholesterol

     



    High cholesterol is produced by increased kapha dosha and a disruption of the meda dhatu, or fat tissue, according to Ayurveda. Keeping cholesterol in control requires balancing kapha and maintaining a healthy meda dhatu.

    Cholesterol, a lipid produced by the liver, is required for optimal body function, but too much can block arteries. Excess kapha dosha and an excessively fatty diet are common causes of high cholesterol.

    Following Ayurvedic diet guidelines and exercising regularly to counterbalance kapha's static and dense features with vata's mobility can keep kapha dosha in control.

     

    Bitter greens can help you cut through kapha's heavy, sticky, and greasy properties in your diet. Season sautéed greens with a pinch of salt and a squeeze of lime juice; the sharpness and acidity will help to minimise kapha. This is a wonderful and kapha-reducing side dish for any dinner.

     

    Ingredients—serves 1

    • 2 large handfuls of a mixture

    of shredded greens, such as kale,

    mustard greens, spinach, chard,

    and fenugreek leaves

    • 1 garlic clove, thinly sliced

    • 1 small red chile, finely sliced

    • 11⁄2 tsp in total of equal parts

    fenugreek, fennel, cumin, coriander,

    and mustard seeds

    • 1

    ⁄2 tsp turmeric powder

    • 1 tsp organic ghee

    • Pinch of rock salt

    • Squeeze of lime juice

     

    Instructions

    Fry the garlic for a few seconds in the ghee, then add the chile and spices before adding the greens. Mix well and cook for a few minutes. Toss the greens with the salt and lime juice on a serving platter.


    You may also want to read more about Ayurveda and Holistic Healing here.







    Ayurveda Dictionary - A Repository of Common Terms and Meanings used in Ayurveda

     


    • AGNI . The biological re that provides energy for the body to function. Agni regulates body heat and aids digestion, absorption, and assimilation of food. It transforms food into energy or consciousness.
    • AHAMKARA. Literally, the “I-former”; the ego; sense of separate self; the feeling of “I am.”
    • AMA. A toxic, morbid substance (both systemic and cellular) produced by undigested food which is the root cause of many diseases.
    • ANUPANA. Substance (such as milk, water, ghee, etc.) that serves as a medium for taking herbs.
    • ARTAVA DHATU. The female reproductive tissue, one of the seven dhatus or bodily tissues.
    • ASTHI DHATU. One of the seven dhatus or bodily tissues; specifically, the bone tissue that supports the body, giving protection, shape, and longevity.
    • AYURVEDA. The science of life; derived from the Sanskrit words ayur meaning life, and veda, knowledge or science. The Vedas are the authentic, ancient, spiritual scriptures of India.
    • BASMATI RICE. A long-grained scented rice originating in the foothills of the Himalayas in India. Easily digestible and nutritious.
    • BASTI. One of the five important cleansing measures of panchakarma, it eliminates excess vata dosha from the system via medicated herbal tea or oil enemas. Helps greatly to heal all vata disorders. The word basti literally means bladder. In ancient times, the apparatus used for the procedure was made out of leather.
    • BHASMA. A specialized Ayurvedic compound prepared and purified by being burned into ash; bhasmas have a high potency and release prana into the system.
    • BHASTRIKA. A breathing practice (pranayama) in which air is passively drawn in and forcibly pushed out, as in a bellows. Increases heat and improves circulation.
    • BHRAMARI. A type of breathing practice (pranayama) in which a soft humming sound, like a bee, is made during exhalation and/or inhalation. Calms the mind and cools pitta.
    • CARDAMOM. Pungent spice from a tropical plant.
    • CHAI. General word for tea; often refers to a spiced black tea made with milk and sugar.
    • CHAKRAS. The energy centers in the body, related to nerve plexus centers, which govern bodily functions. Each chakra is a reservoir of consciousness.
    • CHICKPEA FLOUR. A finely ground yellow flour. Also called gram.
    • CILANTRO. Fresh coriander leaf. This herb is used extensively in Indian cooking and valued for its zesty and cooling taste. Balances spicy dishes.
    • COCONUT MILK. Made from grating the white flesh of the coconut and mixing with a cup of water.
    • COCONUT WATER. The natural juice inside the coconut.
    • DAL. Any type of dried bean, pea, or lentil is called dal. Most dal is husked and split for quick cooking and greater ease of digestion.
    • DHATU. The structural, building, elemental tissue of the body. There are seven dhatus defined in Ayurveda: rasa (plasma); rakta (blood tissue); mamsa (muscle tissue); meda (adipose tissue); asthi (bone marrow); majja (bone and nerves); shukra and artava (male and female reproductive tissue).
    • DOSHA. The three main psycho-physiological functional principles of the body (vata, pitta, and kapha). They determine everyone’s constitution and maintain the integrity of the human body. The doshas govern the individual’s response to changes. When disturbed, they can initiate the disease process.
    • GHEE. Clarified butter; made from unsalted butter that has been gently cooked and the milk solids removed.
    • GUGGULU. Main ingredient in several herbal preparations (yogaraj guggulu, kaishore guggulu, etc.). A resin from a small tree, it has many useful medical actions, including bene ts for the nervous system, tonification, and anti-in amatory action on muscle tissues. Helps increase white blood count (good for the immune system) and is a nervine, rejuvenating tonic.
    • GUNAS. Three qualities influencing all creation: sattva, rajas, and tamas. Sattvic qualities imply essence, reality, consciousness, purity, and clarity of perception. All movement and activity are due to rajas. Tamas brings darkness, inertia, heaviness, and materialistic attitudes. There is a constant interplay among these three gunas in all creation. Also refers to the qualities (hard/soft, hot/cold, etc.) of the three doshas, seven dhatus, and three malas.
    • JAGGERY. An unrefined sugar made from the juice of crushed sugarcane stalks.
    • KAPHA. One of the three doshas, combining the water and earth elements. Kapha is the energy that forms the body’s structure— bones, muscles, tendons—and provides the “glue” that holds the cells together. It supplies the water for all bodily parts and systems, lubricates joints, moisturizes the skin, and maintains immunity. In balance, kapha is expressed as love, calmness, and forgiveness. Out of balance, it leads to attachment, greed, and envy.
    • KHAVAIGUNYA. A weak or defective space within an organ or tissue of the body where a pathological condition is likely to begin.
    • KITCHARI. A cooked mixture of rice and dal and spices that is easy to digest and high in protein. Often used as a nourishing food for a mono-fast.
    • LASSI. A refreshing drink made from yogurt, water, and spices and often served at the end of a meal as a digestive. Can be sweet or salty.
    • MAHAT (or MAHAD). The “great principle,” intelligence, the cosmic aspect of intellect; also contains the individual intellect, called Buddhi.
    • MAJJA DHATU. One of the seven dhatus or bodily tissues; the bone marrow and nerve tissue. It is unctuous and soft. Its main function is to oleate the body, to fill up the bone, and to nourish the shukra dhatu. It plays an important role in communication.
    • MAMSA DHATU . One of the seven dhatus or bodily tissues; the muscle tissue. Produced by rasa and rakta, its main functions are to provide physical strength, coordination, movement, covering, form, and protection.
    • MANTRA. A sacred word or phrase of spiritual significance and power that transcends the mind and yields bliss.
    • MARMA. An energy point on the skin that has a door receptor and is connected to the inner pathways of healing.
    • MUNG DAL. A small bean that has been husked and split. Usually a medium yellow color. Easy to digest.
    • NASYA. Method of administering medication through the nose; one of the ve measures of panchakarma.
    • NIGHTSHADE. Common name for a family of plants including tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant, tobacco, petunias, and belladonna, which have strong medicinal properties. Frequent use may disturb the doshic equilibrium.
    • OJAS. The pure essence of all the bodily tissues (dhatus); the super ne essence of kapha; maintains immunity, strength, and vitality. Ojas creates bliss and awareness in the mental faculties and governs the body’s immune function. If it is depleted, it can lead to death.
    • PANCHAKARMA. Five measures for elimination of excess dosha and/or ama from the body. Used for the purpose of internal puri cation. They are: vomiting (vamana); purgation (virechana); medicated oil or decoction enema (basti); bloodletting (rakta moksha); and nasal administration of specific medication (nasya).
    • PIPPALI. Piper longum; a close relative of black pepper, which has many medicinal applications, especially for digestion and respiration. A rejuvenative tonic (rasayana) for the lungs and liver.
    • PITTA. One of the three doshas; it corresponds to the elements of re and water. Sometimes referred to as the re or bile principle, pitta governs digestion, absorption, assimilation, metabolism, and body temperature. In balance, pitta promotes understanding and intelligence; out of balance pitta arouses anger, hatred, jealousy.
    • PRAKRUTI . Prakruti (spelled with a capital P) is the Cosmic Creativity, the primordial matter.
    • PRAKRUTI. The inherent nature or psychosomatic, biological constitution of the individual, prakruti is the xed constitution of a person, which reflects the proportion of the three doshas (vata, pitta, and kapha) established at conception.
    • PRANA. The vital life energy. Without it, life cannot exist. The ow of cellular intelligence from one cell to another. Equivalent to the Oriental Ch’i or Ki.
    • PRANAYAMA. The control of life energy by various techniques which regulate and restrain breath, through which one can control the mind and improve one’s quality of awareness and perception. Helpful with all types of meditation.
    • PURUSHA. Choiceless, passive awareness; the pure Cosmic Being.
    • RAJAS. One of the three universal qualities (gunas) of Prakruti, Cosmic Creativity. Rajas is active, mobile, dynamic.
    • RAKTA DHATU. The second of the seven tissues (dhatus), rakta mainly contains red blood cells, which carry life energy (prana) to all bodily tissues. This oxygenates, or provides the life function, for all the tissues.
    • RASA DHATU. The rest of the seven dhatus, rasa (plasma) is nourished from digested food, and after absorption, it circulates in the entire body via specific channels. Its main function is to provide nutrition to each cell of the body.
    • RASAYANA. Rejuvenation therapy which brings about renewal, regeneration, and restoration of bodily cells, tissues, and organs, giving longevity to the cells and enhancing immunity and stamina. 
    • RISHI. A seer, a Vedic sage. The ancient rishis perceived and/or recorded the Vedic hymns. These enlightened sages shared their knowledge, medicine, philosophy, and spiritual teachings.
    • RUDRAKSHA. The “tears of Shiva”; the dried seeds from the fruit of the rudraksha tree. Said to be good for the heart both physically and spiritually, helpful for meditation and for “opening the heart chakra.”
    • SAFFRON . A golden yellow spice that comes from the stigma of a particular crocus. The best quality saffron is grown in Spain and Kashmir.
    • AMPRAPTI. The pathogenesis of disease; the entire disease process from its cause through its various stages to the complete manifestation of the disease.
    • SANKHYA. One of the schools of Indian philosophy, Sankhya denotes both “discriminative knowledge” and “enumeration.” It gives a systematic account of cosmic evolution from Purusha (Cosmic Spirit) and Prakruti (Primordial Matter) through the stages of creation: Mahad (Cosmic Intelligence); Ahamkara (individuating principle); Mana (mind); Indriyas (the inner doors of perception); Tanmatras (the objects of perception); and Mahat Bhutas ( ve great elements). Sat means truth and khya means to realize; thus Sankhya means to realize the theory of the creation of the universe in order to realize the ultimate truth of human life. Sankhya reveals the journey of consciousness into matter.
    • SATTVA. One of the three gunas of Prakruti, sattva denotes light, clarity, purity of perception; it is the essence of pure awareness.
    • SHITALI. A practice of pranayama (breath control) that cools the system. Inhalation is through the curled tongue; exhalation is slow, steady, and complete.
    • SHUKRA DHATU. The seventh tissue (dhatu); the male reproductive tissue.
    • SROTAS. Bodily channels.
    • SUCANAT. A granulated natural sugar made from pure sugarcane juice.
    • SURYA NAMASKAR. The Sun Salutation, a series of yoga postures done in a owing sequence with coordinated breathing.
    • TAMAS. One of the three gunas of Prakruti or Nature; its characteristics are darkness, inertia, and ignorance; it is responsible for sleep, drowsiness, dullness, unconsciousness.
    • TEJAS. The pure essence of the re element; the super ne essence of pitta dosha, which governs the transformation of matter into energy and of food, water, and air into consciousness.
    • TIKTA GHRITA . “Bitter ghee,” a specific Ayurvedic compound made of clarified butter with various bitter herbs; used for medicinal purposes.
    • TRIDOSHA. The three organizations or codes of intelligence within the body, mind, and consciousness; the three bodily humors: air (vata), re/bile (pitta), and water (kapha).
    • TRIKATU. An Ayurvedic compound of ginger, black pepper, and pippali (piper longum) that burns ama, detoxi es the body, and improves digestion, absorption, and assimilation.
    • TRIPHALA. An important Ayurvedic compound consisting of three herbs: amalaki, bibhitaki, and haritaki. It is the best laxative and bowel tonic and a balanced rasayana that is good for vata, pitta, and kapha.
    • TULSI. Indian holy basil. The sacred plant of Krishna, this herb is said to open the heart and mind, bestowing the energy of love and devotion.
    • TURBINADO. A granulated sugar made from pure sugarcane.
    • TURMERIC ROOT. An underground rhizome from a perennial plant native to southern India and Asia. Comes in a red and yellow form, but only the yellow is eaten. One of the most important herbs for both internal and external use, it is also essential in most Indian cooking.
    • VATA. One of the three doshas, combining the space and air elements; it is the subtle energy associated with bodily movement and governs breathing, blinking, muscle and tissue movement, pulsation of the heart, and all movements in the cytoplasm and cell membranes. In balance, vata promotes creativity and exibility; out of balance, vata produces fear and anxiety.
    • VIKRUTI. The current state of the individual, as opposed to the original constitution (prakruti) at conception. It may also denote disorder.
    • YOGA. In its deeper sense, Yoga is union of the lower self with the higher self, of the inner with the outer, mortality with immortality. Yoga postures (asanas) promote health, exibility, and purity toward achieving the state of Yoga.



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