Showing posts with label Bana. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Bana. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Were The Pushyabhuti Dynasty Of India?

 


 (sixth–seventh centuries) Northern Indian dynasty whose capital was Kanyakubja, the current city of Kanuaj in the Ganges river basin, and whose domain stretched from Punjab to Bihar in northern India.

After the Gupta empire fell apart, the Pushyabhutis filled the political void in northern India, and the region recovered some of its former glory.

Emperor Harsha (r.606–47), whose reign was recorded in panegyric manner by the dramatist Bana and probably more accurately by the Chinese Buddhist traveler Hsuan Tsang, was the dynasty's greatest monarch.

The latter's writings provide a thorough account of both Harsha himself, in whose court Hsuan Tsang spent time, and daily life in Harsha's realm.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.




Hinduism - What Is The Kadambari?

 


Kadambari is a Sanskrit romantic book written by Bana (7th century), who was a contemporary of northern Indian monarch Harsha.

The book's complicated narrative includes a love tale between the main protagonists, a princess called Kadambari and a prince named Chandripida.

Bana's death left the Kadambari incomplete.

It depicts Indian life at Bana's time in great detail.

In Hindu mythology, Kadru is the sister of Vinata and the daughter of the celestial sage Daksha.

Kadru's offspring are serpents, but her sister's children are eagles, the most renowned of which is Garuda.

The well-known animosity between these species may be traced back to a disagreement between Vinata and Kadru about the color of a heavenly horse's tail, with Vinata claiming that it is white and Kadru claiming that it is black.

The argument intensifies until they come to an understanding that whomever is incorrect will become a slave to the other.

Kadru persuades a few of her snake offspring to hang from the rear of the horse in order to assure her victory.

The tail seems black from a distance.

(Some of her children are against such deception and refuse to participate.) In retaliation, Kadru curses them to die in King Janamjeya's snake-killing ritual.) Vinata feels she has been beaten when she sees the black snakes, and she serves Kadru for many years under exceedingly difficult circumstances.

Vinata is ultimately rescued by her son Garuda, who realizes the ruse behind Vinata's loss and begins a never-ending snake-killing campaign.

 


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - What Is The Harshacharita?


Harshacharita ("Harsha's Deeds").


The playwright Bana (7th century) wrote a drama on the ascent to power of Emperor Harsha.

Bana was a member of Harsha's court and hence a contemporary; his story includes some obvious embellishment as well as a lot of factual information.

Bana was a keen observer, and the Harshacharita's vivid descriptions provide valuable insight into courtly and ordinary life in his period. 


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - Who Was Bana?

 

Bana (7th c. C.E.) was a poet and author who lived during the reign of northern Indian monarch Harsha (r. 606–647) and was a prominent member of his court. 




  • Based on his two greatest works, the Harshacharita, a panegyric chronicle of Harsha's exploits, and Kadambari, a romance left incomplete at his death, Bana is generally regarded as one of the great Sanskrit authors. 

  • He is particularly known for his Chandishataka, a compilation of one hundred poetry about the Goddess in various forms.



You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - What Is Bana?



Bana is a Sanskrit word that means "arrow." 


  • One of the most distinctive items in Hindu iconography, it is connected with a number of deities—the Goddess, Shiva, and Vishnu—and therefore serves as a symbol for none of them. 
  • It's often seen in pictures when the person is holding a bow (dhanus).


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.