Showing posts with label Bhanita. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Bhanita. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is The Hanuman Chalisa?


Hanuman Chalisa (literally, "Hanuman's Forty").

In Hindi, forty poetry stanzas in honor of the deity Hanuman.

Tulsidas (1532–1623), well known as the composer of the Ramcharitmanas, a vernacular translation of the epic Ramayana, is credited with writing it, according to a signature line (bhanita) at the conclusion of the work.

Short poems like the Hanuman Chalisa are often sung as a devotional act or as an established element of worship, and many individuals can memorize the text off the top of their heads.

The passage is written in the chaupai meter, which is the Ramcharitmanas' most common meter.

Hanuman's physical characteristics are described first, followed by his devotion to Rama and his heroic acts in the Ramayana.

The last words reaffirm Hanuman's potency, promise advantages if the verses are spoken, and reclaim Tulsidas' longing for Hanuman to stay in his heart.

 

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Hinduism - What Is Bhanita?

 





A signature line in poetry, especially in the vernacular style of the bhakti poets, in which the author is recognized by name. 




This phrase has two purposes: it identifies the author and it summarizes the poem's theme. 


  • The term bhanita originates from a verb that means "to speak," and the poet stamps his or her authorship on the poem by adding a signature line. 
  • Of course, there's nothing stopping others from following suit. 
  • In a performance setting, the poet's name appears at the start of the last line, signaling the audience to pay close attention to that phrase, which often summarizes the whole poem's meaning.





You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.