Showing posts with label Bharatanatyam. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Bharatanatyam. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is The Mohini Attam?

 


Mohini Attam is a relatively newer type of traditional Indian dance found mostly in Kerala, India's modern state.

Mohini Attam was created at the royal court in Travancore, Kerala, in the early eighteenth century.

Bharatanatyam and Kathakali, a Keralan dance genre, are both represented in this type of dance.

The dance is named after the mythological enchantress Mohini and exudes a sensuality that is coquettish.

Some of the muscular stances in the dance are inspired by Bharatanatyam, while the stylized hand motions (mudras) are predominantly inspired by Kathakali.

Mohan Khokar's Traditions of Indian Classical Dance, published in 1984, has further information.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

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Hinduism - What Is The Kathakali?


Kathakali is an Indian classical dance genre that includes Bharatanatyam, Orissi, Kuchipudi, Kathak, and Manipuri, among others.

Classical dances, like much of traditional Indian culture, are associated with certain locations; Kathakali is largely found in Kerala.

Kathakali, unlike many other classical forms, did not evolve in a temple context.

It emerged as a developed form in the seventeenth century, while it has roots in centuries-old folk and religious plays.

The men's version of Kathakali is Mohini Attam, whereas the women's form is Kathakali.

One of the most spectacular shows in Indian arts is a Kathakali performance.

The dancers' training emphasizes controlled facial motion to promote ease and force of expression, which contributes to the drama.

The dancers are dressed in extravagant costumes and headdresses.

The most remarkable aspect is the intricate makeup—the heroes' faces are painted a vibrant green with fluted ridges made of rice paste affixed to their cheeks, while the villains' chins and foreheads are painted green and red with pith knobs attached.

The dance goes between muscular leaps and grand spins stylistically, with religious scriptures serving as the primary source of storytelling.

Kathakali, like many Indian dances, has a well-developed "vocabulary" of gestures and facial expressions that allows the dancers to participate in elaborate storytelling.

Kathakali, like all other classical dances, has evolved throughout the years, driven on by a shift in the venue from temple courtyards to stage performances.

A scheduled stage performance, for example, requires a well-organized "program" and a predetermined time constraint, while Kathakali performances used to continue all night.

Mohan Khokar's Traditions of Indian Classical Dance, published in 1984, has further information. 


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - What Is Kathak?


Bharatanatyam, Orissi, Kuchipudi, Kathakali, and Manipuri are some of the other Indian classical dance genres.

Classical dances, like much of traditional Indian culture, are associated with certain locations; Kathak is largely found in northern India.

Kathak is said to have developed from Braj's ras lilas, devotional dances depicting incidents from Krishna's life.

This notion has little historical evidence and may just represent a desire to enshrine religion in all aspects of Indian culture.

Kathak, on the other hand, developed as an art form in the northern Indian monarchs' courts, where it was performed for the amusement of the king and his guests.

Over time, two main Kathak hubs emerged: Jaipur, which is recognized for its spectacular footwork, and Lucknow, which is noted for its emphasis on acting.

Kathak is distinguished stylistically by an erect posture with straight legs.

The dance focuses on quick, rhythmic foot movements, which are enhanced by bell strings worn on the dancer's ankles and accompanied by repeated rotations; the body is kept relatively static.

Kathak, like many other forms of Indian dance, has a well-developed "vocabulary" of facial expressions and arm and hand movements that enable the dancer to communicate a wide variety of emotions to the audience.

Mohan Khokar's Traditions of Indian Classical Dance, published in 1984, has further information. 


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - What Is Bharatanatyam?

 








Kathak, Orissi, Kuchipudi, Kathakali, Chau, and Manipuri are some of India's traditional dance styles; others include Kathak, Orissi, Kuchipudi, Kathakali, Chau, and Manipuri. 




Bharatanatyam originated in the temple towns of Tamil Nadu, especially the Brhadeshvar temple in Tanjore. 


  • The deity Shiva, whose most renowned form is Nataraja, the "Lord of the Dance," is honored at this temple. 

According to legend, the name bharata is derived from an acronym of the dance's three most important elements: "bha" from bhava ("feeling"), "ra" from raga ("melodic mood"), and "ta" from tala ("rhythm"), rather than from the sage Bharata, the reputed author of the text on dance known as the Natyashastra. 

Natyam, the second word in the name, simply means "dancing." The origins of Bharatanatyam are unknown. 


Dance is referenced in two Tamil epic poems, Shilappadigaram and Manimegalai, and may be traced back to the early centuries C.E. 


  • Carvings in the Shiva temple in Kanchipuram show that this dance was highly developed during the Pallava dynasty (6th–9th centuries C.E. ), but strong evidence for organized temple dance, including devadasis (hereditary dancers), did not emerge until the Chola era (9th–14th centuries C.E.). 
  • Bharatanatyam was mainly performed in temples until the twentieth century, when it started to be performed on stage. 
  • Royal sponsorship was an essential element in its survival. 


  • The current method of the dance was established by four brothers in the service of Raja Serfoji II of Tanjore in the early nineteenth century as an aesthetic genre. 



Bharatanatyam follows a strongly geometric line in terms of style. 



  • A rigid upper torso, knees stretched outward in line with the rest of the body, and feet splayed softly outward are the most common postures. 
  • In any performance, this stance is a recurrent theme. 
  • Bharatanatyam, like other Indian dances, has a well-developed language of gestures and expressions that allows the dancer to convey intricate tales. 
  • Bharatanatyam, like most other Indian dance traditions, has been impacted by the transition in main theater from temple to stage. 
  • The shift to the stage has unavoidably disturbed some of these religious ties, despite its origins in prayer and devotion. 



Mohan Khokar's Traditions of Indian Classical Dance, published in 1984, has further information.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.