Showing posts with label Chandragupta Maurya. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Chandragupta Maurya. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is The Mudrarakshasa?


 Mudrarakshasa ("The Ring of Rakshasa") - The dramatist Vishakhadatta, who is thought to have lived in the sixth century, wrote the sole extant Sanskrit theater.

Mudrarakshasa is a drama that follows Chandragupta Maurya, the founder of the Maurya dynasty, and his crafty brahmin minister Chanakya as they climb to power.

The narrative of the drama is convoluted, as is the case with many Sanskrit plays, but the drama's climax occurs when the main protagonists are dramatically saved from execution at the last minute.

Despite the fact that the drama is based on true events, scholars believe Chandragupta Maurya's depiction as a weak monarch is false.

Michael Coulson translated the play into English and released it in the collection Three Sanskrit Plays in 1981.


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Hinduism - Who Was Megasthenes?

 


(3rd century BCE) Seleucus Nicator, an officer in Alexander the Great's army who commanded the eastern portion of the empire following Alexander's death, dispatched an ambassador to Chandragupta Maurya's court.

Megasthenes spent a long time at Pataliputra, the Mauryan capital.

His tales of life in India are the first European accounts of the country.

Although his original story no longer survives, it is attested to by many allusions to it in the works of subsequent Greek authors; yet, these writers often express questions about his authenticity and accuracy.


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Hinduism - Who Was Chandragupta Maurya?

 












(r. 321–297 B.C.E.) Chandragupta Maurya  is the Maurya dynasty's founder. 



The youthful Chandragupta established his kingdom by deposing the last member of the Nanda dynasty and establishing his capital at Pataliputra, which is now known as Patna in Bihar. 




From there, he seized control of the Ganges River valley, proceeded south into the Narmada River basin, and then turned his attention to northern India, exploiting the power vacuum left by Alexander the Great's previous invasion. 






He defeated Alexander's commander Seleucus Nicator in combat in 303 B.C.E., then consented to a treaty that gave him vast swaths of modern-day Afghanistan. 


Despite the fight, ties between the two seem to have been cordial, since Seleucus Nicator sent Megasthenes, an ambassador to Pataliputra, who stayed there for many years. 


Chandragupta is said to have received advice from a great brahmin minister known as Kautilya or Chanakya, who is credited with writing the Arthashastra. 



Chandragupta abandoned his kingdom to become a Jain monk and died of ceremonial hunger, according to tradition. 






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