Showing posts with label Charaka Samhita. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Charaka Samhita. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Was Sushruta?

 


Sushruta (4th c.) is traditionally considered as the author of the Sushruta Samhita, he was a physician and writer.

The Sushruta Samhita is one of two key sources for Ayurveda, an Indian medicinal tradition, along with the somewhat older Charaka Samhita.


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Hinduism - What Is The Sushruta Samhita?

 

 

Sushruta Samhita is a Hindu scripture.

One of the two key sources for the Indian medicinal tradition known as ayurveda, together with the somewhat older Charaka Samhita.

The principle of the three body humors—vata (wind), pitta (bile), and kapha (blood)—underpins ayurveda (phlegm).

Although everyone has all three humors, their variable quantities are used to explain differences in body types, metabolic dispositions, and personality traits.

An imbalance of these humors is the cause of sickness, whether produced by environmental factors or personal behaviors, and the condition of this equilibrium is the state of health.

The Sushruta Samhita has been edited and translated into other languages, and it has been used as a source for secondary research, such as Debiprasad Chatto padhyaya's Science and Society in Ancient India, published in 1977.


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Hinduism - What Is Charaka Samhita?




One of the two main sources for the traditional Indian medical school known as ayurveda, together with the later Sushruta Samhita. 



Despite the fact that it is ascribed to Charaka, given its references to a variety of medical systems and methods, it is more likely a compilation from previous sources. 





The idea of the three body humors—vata (wind), pitta (bile), and kapha (blood)—underpins ayurveda's medical foundation (phlegm). 

Although everyone possesses all three humors, each is made up of distinct components, the quantities of which are used to explain varied body types, metabolic inclinations, and personalities. 

Diseases are produced by an imbalance of these humors, which may be induced by one's environment or personal behaviors, while health is the condition of being in balance. 

The Charaka Samhita has been revised and translated into a number of languages, and it has been used as a source for secondary studies such as Debiprasad Chattopadhyaya's 1977 book Science and Society in Ancient India. 



You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.