Showing posts with label Chaupai. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Chaupai. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is The Hanuman Chalisa?


Hanuman Chalisa (literally, "Hanuman's Forty").

In Hindi, forty poetry stanzas in honor of the deity Hanuman.

Tulsidas (1532–1623), well known as the composer of the Ramcharitmanas, a vernacular translation of the epic Ramayana, is credited with writing it, according to a signature line (bhanita) at the conclusion of the work.

Short poems like the Hanuman Chalisa are often sung as a devotional act or as an established element of worship, and many individuals can memorize the text off the top of their heads.

The passage is written in the chaupai meter, which is the Ramcharitmanas' most common meter.

Hanuman's physical characteristics are described first, followed by his devotion to Rama and his heroic acts in the Ramayana.

The last words reaffirm Hanuman's potency, promise advantages if the verses are spoken, and reclaim Tulsidas' longing for Hanuman to stay in his heart.

 

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Hinduism - What Is Chaupai?

 




("four-footed") Northern Indian poetry has a poetic form. The chaupai is made up of four lines, as its name implies. 



The rhyme scheme is aabb, which has led some to believe it is a two-line segment compound. 


Each line includes sixteen metric beats organized in a pattern of 6 + 4 + 4 + 2 based on the difference between “heavy” and “light” syllables. 

A heavy syllable has a lengthy vowel or consonant cluster and counts as two metric beats; all other syllables count as one beat. 

The chaupai is a major meter in bhakti (devotional) poetry and one of the most important meters in medieval Hindi literature, especially for larger narrative works. 

Its most famous use is in the Ramcharitmanas, Tulsidas' retelling of the Ramayana. 





You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.