Showing posts with label Concentration. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Concentration. Show all posts

Mindfulness Concentration Insight

 


Mindfulness practice has the potential to help us understand how the mind operates, namely how it causes pain and how it may be eased. 

Mindfulness requires a particular level of attention; without it, we can't fully notice the workings of the mind and become lost in our ideas about what's going on rather than experiencing it directly. 

Because concentration is the cornerstone for mindfulness practice, the activities described generally described as mindfulness have primarily been concentration exercises. From focusing to being aware. 


Most concentration exercises may also be used as mindfulness exercises in the following way: 


  1. After you've found that your mind has calmed down during concentration meditation, you may go on to mindfulness practice. 
  2. At first, this entails discreetly observing where the mind goes when it leaves an object of focus and naming these departures. 
  3. If your mind begins to construct plans during breath meditation, for example, you might make a mental note of “planning” and then restore your focus to the breath. 
  4. You can make a mental note of “judging” if you catch yourself thinking judgmental thoughts. 
  5. You can note "hearing" if your mind travels to other experiences, such as a sound in the room. 
  6. These notes are discreetly murmured in the background, while your primary focus is on your breathing. 
  7. If your mind becomes particularly calm, you can try letting go of the breath entirely as an anchor and allowing your attention to be drawn to whatever objects are currently occupying your attention—whether sounds, sensations of contact as you sit, emotions as they manifest in the body, or other experiences. 
  8. Because we allow the mind to be open to whatever enters our consciousness, this is frequently referred to as choice less awareness. 
  9. The mind is free to roam, but unlike during moments of mindlessness, we stay aware of what is now in our consciousness. 
  10. Allowing ideas and pictures to be objects of our attention is also conceivable, but because most of us become caught in them, this is typically only achievable during prolonged retreat practice. 


It's a fine art to strike the right balance between concentration exercise, in which we return repeatedly to a pre-selected object of attention, and mindfulness practice, in which we let the mind to dwell on diverse objects as they emerge. 


  • You can usually rely on the intensity of your attention to lead you. 
  • When your attention is strong, you might want to try mindfulness more. 
  • You may return to concentration exercise more when it is weaker and your focus is more fragmented. 
  • You'll probably alter whatever sorts of meditation you like as you build a structured practice schedule. 
  • Depending on what you've learned about the impact of each of them for you, you may want to focus on sitting meditation at times and mix in the body scan, walking, or eating activities at other times. 
  • You'll vary when you complete each one as a concentration or mindfulness practice, regardless of whatever style you pick. 

Because each person's intellect and life are unique, it's tough to prescribe a fixed pattern. However, here are some general rules. 


  • If you can only devote 20 minutes to formal practice on a less-than-daily basis, you'll probably prefer concentration practice because your mind won't have enough time to calm down. 
  • Because you'll notice more sessions in which the mind becomes concentrated if you can practice for longer amounts of time more regularly, you'll have more opportunity to add mindfulness practice. 
  • When your mind is busy or disturbed, even with more intense practice, you may be able to maintain attention for days or weeks at a time. 
  • During other times, though, you may start each meditation session with concentration practice, then extend your field of awareness to practice mindfulness—noticing where your mind moves or allowing your attention to rest on diverse mental objects—after the mind has settled a bit. 
  • The key to making these decisions is to be easy on yourself. There is no such thing as a "better" type of practice. 
  • Both disciplines, in the end, help us understand how our minds function and how we unintentionally cause misery to ourselves and others. 
  • There is also a lot of overlap between concentration and mindfulness practices—we may notice where our minds wander when we lose focus when we perform concentration practice, and we can still concentrate on the object at hand when we perform mindfulness practice. 
  • It's best not to stress too much about striking the right balance; with practice, you'll be able to detect which practices to prioritize at any given moment.


You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation here.



Yogic Techniques to Improve Concentration


Psychic, Powers, Superhero, Magic, Eyes


TRATAK (STEADY GAZING). 


A candle flame, the moon, a dazzling star, a mandala, a beautiful flower, or the eyes of a portrait of your guru or a saint are all examples of external objects to which the gaze is focused without blinking and with entire focus. 

To practice tratak on a photo of your guru, Jesus Christ, Krishna, or a saint, sit in a comfortable and relaxed position and hold the photo of your choosing at eye level and one arm's length in front of you. 

With your eyes open, stare at it steadily with full concentration and interest for a minute or two, then close your eyes and envision the face and eyes of the Master, guru, or saint you've been staring at. 

By envisioning these Masters in your spiritual eye, you can tune in to their consciousness. Within the lotus of your heart, feel their presence, love, joy, light, and vitality. 

Remember, no matter how much love you have for the personalized image (saint, guru, deity, etc. ), the object of devotional concentration should always be regarded as just one expression of God, lest we lose sight of the unity that exists behind the multiplicity of manifestations — the un-manifested godhead, that which is omnipresent, omnipotent, and omniscient. 

We must move beyond personality worship and form worship to attune to the divine Consciousness that gives and manifests love, light, joy, and knowledge via the form of personality. 



JAPA 


Japa is the practice of repeating any of God's Names in order to cultivate devotion and focus the thoughts on Him. Repetition can be done aloud, in hushed tones, or silently to oneself. Japa is commonly performed using mala beads or a rosary that contains 108 beads. 

The number 108 has special meaning since ancient yogis calculated that a normal individual takes 21,600 breaths in 24 hours; 200 times 108 = 21,600. One hundred and eight is also a spiritual number, as it is divisible by nine. When done with attention and a total surrender to God, mental japa prepares the mind for profound meditation. 

Consistent japa practice cleanses the mind and redirects the flow of attention away from extraneous objects and toward God. Sit in a comfortable meditation position and focus on the heart chakra (anahata) or the space between the brows (the spiritual eye) to practice japa — see page 86. 

The mind may be readily controlled by focusing the thoughts and closing the eyes on the inner spiritual eye. In your right hand, hold your japa mala or rosary. Hold the first little bead next to the bigger sumeru bead between your right thumb and middle finger and recite your mantra once with focus. Continue with the next little bead, repeating the mantra. 

Continue working your way around the mala, one bead at a time, until you've completed all 108 mantras. When you return to the sumeru bead, do not cross it to begin the following round; instead, turn the mala and start from the last bead before the sumeru.



KIRTAN 

Kirtan, or chanting, is a powerful tool for channeling and focusing the mind's energy inward toward God. Chanting devotional songs stimulates the heart's innate love and dedication. 

It has the potential to arouse in us a desire to know and be closer to God. It provides us a taste of the Self, which is happiness. Chanting also promotes feelings of love, joy, and serenity. 

Ask yourself, "Who am I chanting to and why?" before you begin to chant. 


Chanting is half the fight


This is crucial if you want to transcend your ego. When we chant, we should experience the presence of the Lord in our hearts. 

Chant with love and dedication, and focus your thoughts solely on God. Listen carefully to the lyrics and experience the chants' energy and vibratory force as you chant. 

Concentrate on the spiritual eye (ajna chakra) or the heart chakra with your eyes closed. 

Begin by chanting aloud, allowing the words and rhythms of the chant to fill your body and mind, then progressively lower the volume while increasing the inner experience of the chant until you reach the super-conscious level, when you may transform internal vibrations into spiritual realizations.

These encouraging remarks from a great Master are a fantastic source of encouragement for anybody who is really looking for God.



You may also want to read more about Yoga and Holistic Healing here.





24 Yoga Dharanas

 



1. Focus the mind on something inside or beyond the body. Maintain the position for a while. Dharana is my name. You'll have to do something on a regular basis. Dharana is the foundation of Laya-Yoga.

2. Purify the mind first by doing Yama, Niyama, and Dharana, and then move on to Dharana.
 Concentration is useless if it is not pure. Concentration is a skill that certain occultists possess. They, on the other hand, have no decent character. That is why they have not made much spiritual gains.

3. Those who have a steady Asana and have cleansed the Yoga Nadis will find it easier to focus. If you eliminate all distractions, the concentration would be intense. A real Brahmachari who has maintained his Veerya would be able to concentrate extremely well.

4. Some rash, eager students rush into Dharana without first completing the required ethical preparation. This is a huge mistake. The value of ethical perfection cannot be overstated.

5. You should focus on any of the seven Chakras on the inside and any Devata, Hari, Krishna, or Devi on the outside.

6. Focus requires a high level of attention. He who has honed his focus capacity will be able to concentrate well. A man packed with love and all kinds of wonderful impulses can hardly focus on something for more than a second. Like a monkey, his mind would be racing.

7. He who has mastered Pratyahara (withdrawing the senses from the objects) will be able to focus well. You'll need to take the spiritual journey one step at a time, stage by stage. To begin, lay the foundation of Yama, Niyama, Asana, Pranayama, and Pratyahara. Only then can Dharana and Dhyana's superstructure be successful.

8. You should be able to see the focus of concentration clearly even though it is not there. You must be able to recall the mental image at all time. You should be able to do this without too much hassle if you have decent concentration skills.

9. You should focus on the tick-tock sound of a watch, the flame of a candle, or some other object that is appealing to the mind in the early stages of meditation. This is an example of concrete focus. There will be no focus until the mind has anything to rest on.
A fun thing may be set in the head. Fixing the mind on any object that it dislikes is extremely difficult at first.

10. You must reduce your worldly habits if you wish to improve your concentrating capacity. Every day, for at least two hours, you must observe Mouna.

11. Concentrate on the object of focus until the mind is well founded on it.
Carry the eye back to the object as it wanders away.

12. The other senses are disabled when focus is strong and heavy. A individual with tremendous psychic abilities who practices focus for one hour a day has tremendous psychic abilities. He'll have a good desire to succeed.

13. Vedantins attempt to retrain the mind to focus on Atman. Their Dharana is this. Hatha and Raja Yogins focus their attention on the six Chakras. Bhaktas are solely focused on their Ishta Devata. Other meditation objects are identified in Trataka and Laya Yoga. Both aspirants must be able to concentrate.

14. Focus practitioners progress rapidly. They can complete any task faster and more efficiently. What some can do in six hours can be accomplished in half an hour by anyone with a focused mind. Concentration purifies and calms raging impulses, activates mind currents, and clarifies concepts. Concentration often aids a person's material advancement.
In his office or business-house, he can produce excellent results. What was previously cloudy and hazy becomes simpler and definite; what was previously complicated becomes simple; and what was previously nuanced, befuddling, and confounding becomes easily graspable. Concentration allows you to do something. Nothing is difficult for someone who practices focus on a daily basis.
Concentration is needed for clairvoyance, clairaudience, mesmerism, hypnotism, thought-reading, music, mathematics, and other sciences.

15. Find a peaceful place to retreat to. Close your eyes for a moment. When you dream about an apple, see what happens.
You might consider its color, form, and scale, as well as different sections such as the skin, pulp, and seeds. You might consider the countries from which it is manufactured, such as Australia or Kashmir. Its acidic or sweet flavor, as well as its effects on the digestive system and blood, can come to mind. Other fruits' ideas can also attempt to join into the rule of association. The mind might start to entertain any other unrelated thoughts. It could start to stray. It might consider seeing a friend at 4 p.m. at the Railway Station. It might consider buying a towel, a tin of tea, or some biscuits. You should strive to follow a clear path of thinking. There should be no pause in the thought process. You must not entertain any other thoughts that are unrelated to the current subject. The ego will do everything it can to stay in its old grooves. You'll have to put in a lot of effort at first. It's a little like trying to climb a steep slope. When you achieve concentration success, you will be overjoyed and overjoyed.

16. Just as physical laws such as gravity and cohesion exist in the physical universe, definite mental laws such as association, relativity, and contiguity operate in the mental plane or thought-world. These rules should be well understood by those who practice concentration.
When the mind considers an entity, it can also consider its attributes and components. When it considers a source, it can also consider its consequence.

17. You will get new ideas each time you read the Bhagavad Gita or the Vicar of Wakefield with attention. You can gain knowledge by concentrating. In the realm of mental consciousness, subtle esoteric interpretations will emerge. You will comprehend the metaphysical significance's inner depth.

18. Don't fight your mind while you're concentrating on an object. Tension can be avoided in the body. Continuously think about the object in a gentle way. When one is starving and recovering from an acute illness, it is very difficult to practice concentration.

19. Don't be bothered if feelings interfere with your focus. They're going to die too. You'll have to tax your willpower if you want to scare them further. Get a nonchalant manner. The Vedantin uses the formula "I am a Sakshi with mental adjustments" to push away emotions. It makes no difference to me. “Get out of here.” The Bhakta actually prays, and God responds with assistance.

20. Develop a good habit of focusing on a variety of objects, both gross and subtle, of different sizes, over time. When you sit down to concentrate, the mood will come to you quickly and effortlessly.

21. Focus is needed when reading a novel. It's pointless to skim through the pages in a rushed way. One page could suffice. Bring the book to a close. Pay attention to what you've read. Find parallel lines in the Gita, Upanishads, and other sacred texts.

22. At first, the process of concentrating is disgusting and exhausting for a neophyte. In his mind and brain, he would carve fresh grooves. He develops a strong interest after a period of time, say two or three months. He's experiencing a different kind of pleasure. The only way to get rid of the miseries and tribulations is to concentrate. Your only responsibility is to gain discipline, and it is by concentration that you can achieve the ultimate beatitude, Self-realization. When it comes to concentration, charity and Rajasuya Yajna are nothing.

23. Do not want to fulfill impulses that emerge in the subconscious. As soon as they appear, reject them. Desires may be diminished over time by gradual exercise. The mind's modifications would now be greatly reduced.

24. You must eliminate all behavioral weaknesses, superstitions, and erroneous and incorrect Samskaras. Only then would you be able to focus your thoughts.