Showing posts with label Dasharatha. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Dasharatha. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Is Sumati And Sumitra In Hindu Mythology?

 

One of King Sagar's wives in Hindu legend.

Sumati and her co-wife Keshini are given a choice in the number of children they will have: one will bear a single son through whom the lineage will continue, while the other will bear sixty thousand boys who will all die before they have any progeny, according to a sage's blessing.

Sumati selects the latter, and when her sixty thousand lovely sons go out to find their father's sacrifice horse, they are consumed by the sage Kapila's wrath.

Despite the fact that these boys die without trouble, they have a significant impact on the planet because Keshini's descendants bring the Ganges to earth to provide peace to their spirits.

Sumitra is one of King Dasharatha's three wives and the mother of Rama's half-brothers, the twins Lakshmana and Shatrughna, in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics.

Her sons are essential characters in the epic because of their dedication and service to Rama, while Sumitra is only relevant because she bears them.


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Hinduism - Who IS Rishyashringa In Hindu Mythology?

 


Rishyashringa  is a sage from the Ramayana, the first of India's two major epics.

Rishyashringa is tasked by King Dasharatha to make a significant sacrifice in order for the king's women to conceive.

A radiant figure comes from the sacrificial fire at the conclusion of Rishyashringa's sacrifice, lays a pot of milk-rice in front of Dasharatha, and tells him to give it to his wives.

Dasharatha distributes the contents amongst his three wives, Kausalya, Kaikeyi, and Sumitra, and they all have sons in due time.

Kausalya is Rama's daughter and the protagonist of the Ramayana.

Bharata's mother is Kaikeyi, while Lakshmana and Shatrughna's mother is Sumitra.


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Hinduism - Who Is Raghu In Hindu Mythology?

 

Raghu is the grandfather of Ruler Dasharatha and a renowned king of the Ikshvaku dynasty in Hindu mythology.

Rama, the protagonist of the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Hindu epics, is one of Dasharatha's sons.


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Hinduism - Who Is Manthara In Hindu Mythology?

 

Manthara is the hunchbacked maid of King Dasharatha's wife, Kaikeyi, in the Ramayana, the older of the two major Indian epics.

Kaikeyi's mind is steadily poisoned by Manthara's whisperings against Dasharatha's son Rama, the god-king who is the epic's protagonist.

She persuades the queen that if she and her son Bharata are permitted to survive after Rama is crowned Dasharatha's heir, they would be no better than slaves.

Kaikeyi is persuaded by Manthara to claim two boons that Dasharatha granted her years ago.

With the first boon, she orders Rama to be exiled to the jungle for fourteen years, and with the second, she orders Rama's son Bharata to be anointed heir in his stead.

The earliest version of the epic, Valmiki's Ramayana, portrays Manthara as a true villain.

Although, given the concept in karma, her physical impairments would have been perceived as showing moral and spiritual deformities as well, there is little explanation for her behavior.

Manthara's actions is finally attributed to the gods in the Ramayana, authored by the poet-saint Tulsidas (1532–1623? ), who send the goddess Saraswati to muddle Manthara's mind, putting in motion the sequence of events leading to the demon Ravana's destruction.

Tulsidas, in typical Tulsidas manner, gives the incident a more altruistic spin, linking it to Rama's ultimate reason for being born on Earth.


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Hinduism - Who Is Lakshmana In Hindu Mythology?


Lakshmana is one of King Dasharatha's sons with his wife Sumitra, and the younger half-brother of Rama, the epic's protagonist, in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics.

Lakshmana is the ideal younger brother throughout the Ramayana, living only to serve and assist Rama.

When Rama is exiled to the forest for fourteen years, Lakshmana follows him like a shadow the whole time, first as a forest ascetic, looking for Rama's stolen wife Sita, then fighting heroically in the battle with Ravana's army, and ultimately returning to serve Rama at his court in Ayodhya.

Many of the Ramayana's characters are archetypes for Indian cultural beliefs.

As with his brother Bharata, Lakshmana represents the perfect younger brother.

Brothers are the center of the joint family in northern India.

Sisters, on the other hand, stay at home after marriage and live with their married families.

Every generation's oldest brother ultimately ascends to the position of joint family leader.

The oldest brother, who has main authority and responsibility for the whole family, cannot thrive without the participation of his younger brothers, who must respect and support his authority.

Lakshmana is a devoted younger brother in his devotion to Rama and his full disregard for his own wants.

Lakshmana is far from faultless, despite his courage, heroism, and complete devotion to Rama.

He lacks Rama's tolerance and discernment, and he acts before he thinks.

When Bharata pursues the two brothers after they have gone into exile, Lakshmana assumes that Bharata is taking advantage of the chance to murder them in order to smooth his path to the throne.

Lakshmana plots to assassinate Bharata, but Rama's logic prevents a disaster.

Shurpanakha, a demon princess and sister of Ravana, Lanka's demon-king, is Lakshmana's most grievous blunder in judgment.

When she makes sexual approaches toward Lakshmana, he mocks her before mutilating her.

Ravana kidnaps Rama's wife, Sita, in order to exact vengeance on the brothers.

Lakshmana, like all the characters in the Ramayana, is neither good nor bad; he has many qualities as well as some serious defects. 


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Hinduism - Where Is Koshala In Hindu Mythology?


This is the name of the territory along the banks of the river Sarayu where Rama's father, King Dasharatha, ruled in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics. 


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Hinduism - Who Is Kaikeyi In Hindu Mythology?

 

Kaikeyi is the second wife of King Dasharatha, the mother of Bharata, and the foster mother of Rama, the epic's protagonist, in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics.

Kaikeyi is personally responsible for one of the epic's most heinous acts: forcing Rama into a fourteen-year exile in the forest, which is a crucial story point.

Despite her horrible deeds, she is not seen as a nasty person, but rather as a mother who acts out of love for her son but is plagued by poor judgment and bad advise.

Kaikeyi is overjoyed when Dasharatha declares that he plans to appoint Rama as the successor to the kingdom.

Rama has always held Bharata in the same regard as his own mother, Kausalya, and has regarded him as an equal.

Kaikeyi's psyche was steadily poisoned by her maid, Manthara, as the ceremony day neared.

Manthara persuades Kaikeyi that, after Rama is crowned heir-apparent, she and Bharata would be treated as chattel, or things, if they are permitted to live at all.

Kaikeyi's fear for her son drives her to take desperate measures.

Dasharatha had given Kaikeyi two boons, or gifts, for her assistance in winning a major battle many years previously.

She has never repaid these boons, but now asks that Dasharatha banish Rama to the wilderness for fourteen years and replace him with Bharata as king.

Dasharatha tries to persuade Kaikeyi to reconsider her decision, but she refuses.

Finally, he is obliged to give her desire.

Not only does Kaikeyi's request bring her shame from her husband, who blames her for separating him from Rama, but it also brings her shame from her kid.

Bharata chastises Kaikeyi for depriving Rama of something that is properly his, and he refuses to reign until Rama orders him to serve in his place during the exile.

Rama, who is depicted in the epic as serenely glad to accept his parents' orders, whatever they may be, is the only one who does not condemn her.


 


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Hinduism - Who Is Kausalya In Hindu Mythology?


Kausalya is the first wife of King Dasharatha and the mother of the god-king Rama in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics. 


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Hinduism - Who Is Jabali In Hindu Mythology?


In Hindu mythology, Jabali is a prominent sage who is the son of the sage Vishvamitra.

Despite his biological beginnings, Jabali ultimately gets affiliated with the sage Vasishtha, his father's worst adversary.

Jabali joins Vasishtha's party and becomes one of King Dasharatha's counsellors, the father of the god-king Rama in the epic Ramayana. 


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Hinduism - What Is An Ekadashi? What Are The Different Ekadashis?

 


The Hindu religious calendar is based on the lunar calendar, which divides the year into twelve lunar months, each split evenly into "dark" (waning) and "bright" (waxing) halves. 

The eleventh day of the lunar month, in both the waning and waxing halves, is known as Ekadashi. 

During each half of the lunar cycle, some days are designated as holy to certain gods and goddesses, and these are days for special worship. 

The deity Vishnu considers the ekadashi, or eleventh day, of each lunar month to be holy. 

With the exception of one, each of the twenty-four ekadashis has its own name, charter story, mandated ceremonies, and expected outcome. 

Each of these twenty-four festival days is observed by pious Vaishnavas. 


The ekadashis are: 


  1. Papamochani Ekadashi and Kamada Ekadashi during Chaitra, 
  2. Baruthani Ekadashi and Mohini Ekadashi during Baisakh, 
  3. Achala Ekadashi and Nirjala Ekadashi during Jyeshth, 
  4. Yogini Ekadashi and Devshayani Ekadashi during Ashadh, 
  5. Kamika Ekadashi and Putrada Ekadashi during Kamika 
  6. During the lunar month of Bhadrapada, Aja Ekadashi and Parivartini Ekadashi, 
  7. Indira Ekadashi and Papankusha Ekadashi, 
  8. Rambha Ekadashi and Devotthayan Ekadashi, 
  9. Utpanna Ekadashi and Mokshada Ekadashi, 
  10. Paush Ekadashi and Putrada Ekadashi, 
  11. Magh Ekadashi and Vijaya Ekad 

 

Some of these ekadashis are more significant to the general public than others, notably the Devshayani and Devotthayan Ekadashis, which commemorate Vishnu's "sleep" during the chaturmas period during the rainy season. 

Putrada ("son-giving") Ekadashi is the only ekadashi that appears twice. 


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Hinduism - What Is The Padinenkilkanakku Or The Eighteen Minor Works?



Padinenkilkanakku is a collection of eighteen minor works of literature. 

It is a collection of early Tamil works of literature that was completed by the late fifth century C.E. and was given the name Padinenkilkanakku. 

All of these works have a moral focus and are intended to instill ethical or religious principles in the listeners. 

The Tirukkural and the Naladiyar are two of the most well-known instances in this collection. 




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Hinduism - What Are The Hindu Beliefs Associated With Eclipses?

 


Eclipses are universally regarded as exceedingly inauspicious and ritually perilous events. 

Indian astronomers, like those of many other cultures, were able to work out the motion of the moon and, as a result, were able to forecast both solar and lunar eclipses pretty correctly. 

The narrative of the Tortoise avatar, in which gods and demons join forces to churn the Ocean of Milk into the nectar of immortality, which they would subsequently share, is the traditional mythological explanation for eclipses. 

The gods deceive the demons out of their part, but when the gods divide it up, the demon Sainhikeya disguises himself and enters their midst. 

The sun and moon warn the deity Vishnu of Sainhikeya's presence as he starts to drink, and Vishnu promptly cuts off the demon's head with his discus. 

However, after drinking part of the nectar, the demon's head and trunk have both become eternal, with the head becoming Rahu and the trunk becoming Ketu. 

Rahu has a special dislike for the sun and moon, the gods who brought him death, and wants to devour them anytime he sees them in the sky. 

He always succeeds, but they escape unhurt through Rahu's severed neck since he no longer has a body to digest them. 

Eclipses are considered inauspicious and ritually dangerous because to their relationship with Rahu, and in popular culture, eclipses are said to radiate malevolent rays with a physical character. 

As a result of this hazard, many people choose to stay inside for the duration of an eclipse. 

People typically practice rituals of protection during eclipses, including providing contributions (dana) to stave off possible bad luck. 

Pregnant women must be especially cautious, should the bad luck of the day influence the developing child. 

Some people think that pregnant women should lay motionless during eclipses because they are afraid that the infant would be delivered without the body part that the lady moved. 

People wash (snana) and undertake other purification ceremonies after the eclipse to eradicate any remaining impurities (ashaucha) or ill luck. 



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Hinduism - What Is The Hindu Attitude Towards Food And Eating?


 The act of eating is filled with cultural importance and messages all throughout the globe, and Hindu culture is no different. 

Given their great focus on purity, Hindus place a high value on food preparation and eating. 

Individual and group social status is communicated by factors such as who one eats with, who may cook one's meal, and what sorts of food one will consume and how it should be prepared. 

The highest-status tribes, particularly brahmins, are the tightest when it comes to eating habits. 

For the most part, such high-status groups follow the commensality principle, which entails only consuming food prepared by members of their social group. 

There is a significant difference between vegetarian and nonvegetarian diets when it comes to the substance of one's food. 

A strictly vegetarian diet signifies greater status, whereas nonvegetarians have different levels of status based on the sorts of meat they consume. 

Every meal is a potential source of ceremonial contamination for Orthodox Hindus, and it must be properly controlled. 

Food cooked in water is seen to be significantly more sensitive to pollution (ashaucha), therefore it is accepted with more caution, but food fried in oil or ghee is thought to be lot more resistant to pollution and hence a lower source of ritual risk. 

From a religious standpoint, the safest meal is one that is prepared and consumed at home. 



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Hinduism - Who Is Dasharatha?

 


Dasharatha is a monarch of the Ikshvaku dynasty and the father of Rama, the protagonist of the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics. 

Dasharatha is often shown as a good monarch, but, like many other figures in Indian mythology, his final fate is determined by the repercussions of a curse that he cannot escape. 

Dasharatha used to like hunting as a young guy. 

He shoots an arrow to the area where he hears the sound of an animal drinking at a creek on one occasion. 

When he goes to investigate, he discovers a young guy who has been hit by his arrow, along with the water jug he had been filling at his side. 

With his final breaths, the young man tells Dasharatha that he is his blind parents' only source of support and orders Dasharatha to notify them of his death. 

Dasharatha is a man of honor, and he honors the boy's last wish. 

When the boy's father hears the account, he becomes enraged and curses Dasharatha to die in the same way, without his sons. 

For many years, it seemed that Dasharatha's curse would not be fulfilled since he had no sons despite having three wives: Kausalya, Kaikeyi, and Sumitra. 

Dasharatha supports a number of religious ceremonies for the birth of boys before commissioning the sage Rishyashringa to make a tremendous sacrifice. 

A glowing figure comes from the sacrificial fire at the end of the ceremony, sets a pot of milk-rice in front of Dasharatha, and tells him to give it to his wives. 

Dasharatha distributes the pot's contents between Kausalya and Kaikeyi, who each give Sumitra a portion. 

Kausalya gives birth to Rama, Kaikeyi to Bharata, and Sumitra gives birth to twins Lakshmana and Shatrughna after getting a portion from each of her co-wives. 

Dasharatha is blissfully pleased as his boys grow into maturity, and the memory of the curse slips from his mind. 

Rama demonstrates his skill and kindness as a young man, and Dasharatha chooses him to be the heir apparent. 

The curse, however, comes to fruition the night before the ceremony. 

The whisperings of Rama's maid Manthara subtly poisoned his stepmother Kaikeyi's psyche throughout the preparations leading up to his investiture. 

Manthara persuades Kaikeyi that when Rama is proclaimed heir-apparent, she and her son Bharata would be nothing more than slaves. 

Kaikeyi is forced to take harsh measures as a result of this. 

Dasharatha had promised Kaikeyi two benefits in exchange for her assistance in winning a big battle many years previously. 

She has never asked for these things before, but she now demands that Rama spend fourteen years in exile in the jungle, and that her own son, Bharata, take his place as king. 

Dasharatha begs Kaikeyi to reconsider, but she is certain that her desires must be fulfilled if Dasharatha is to maintain the family honor. 

Later, Dasharatha begs Rama to defy him and seize the kingdom by force, but Rama refuses since it is an unjust deed. 

Rama departs into the wilderness, thereby preserving the family honor, but Dasharatha dies of a broken heart as a result of his grief at being separated from Rama. 


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