Showing posts with label Devotthayan Ekadashi. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Devotthayan Ekadashi. Show all posts

Hinduism - When Is The Month Of Kartik In The Hindu Lunar Calendar?


Kartik is the eighth month of the lunar year, and it normally falls between October and November, according to the lunar calendar, which is used to determine most Hindu religious events.

Kartik falls during the harvest season in northern India, when the weather is favorable.

Kartik Purnima, Rambha Ekadashi, Narak Chaturdashi, Diwali, Govardhan Puja (Annakut), Devotthayan Ekadashi, Tulsi Vivah, and Kartik Purnima are among the most ritually significant months of the year. 


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Hinduism - What Are The Devotthayan And Devshayani Ekadashi?


Devotthayan Ekadashi is the eleventh day (ekadashi) of the bright (waxing) half of the lunar month Kartik (October–November) is celebrated. 

This is the day when the deity Vishnu emerges from his four-month rest, which began on the Devshayani Ekadashi (“eleventh day festival”) in Ashadh (June–July). 

The ritually perilous chaturmas ("four-month") period ends when Vishnu awakens, and auspicious life-cycle ceremonies like as marriages and the sacred thread ceremony ("adolescent initiation") may resume. 

The eleventh day (ekadashi) of the bright (waxing) half of the lunar month of Ashadh is celebrated as Devshayani Ekadashi (June-July). 

This is the day when the deity Vishnu goes asleep on his serpent couch Shesha and does not wake up until Devotthayan Ekadashi, four lunar months later. 

Because it is a time when the deity is said to be insensible, this four-month period (chaturmas) is considered unfortunate and ritually harmful. 

Weddings and other life-cycle rites that may be postponed are often not conducted during this time. 

The arrival of the rainy season corresponds with the start of this celebration, and the ambivalence associated with the rains may be witnessed here. 

On the one hand, rains are necessary for crops and hence promote life and fertility. 

The rains, on the other hand, bring with them actual risks such as snakes, scorpions, and gastrointestinal diseases. 



You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.