Showing posts with label Dravida Architecture. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Dravida Architecture. Show all posts

Hinduism - Where IS Kumbhakonam In India?

 

Kumbhakonam is one of the several temple towns in Tamil Nadu's Tanjore district, reflecting the territory's importance as the seat of the Chola dynasty's rulers.

Kumbhakonam is home to a number of major temples.

The temple structures, which are built in the Dravida architectural style, are of moderate height, occupy a vast area, and are encircled by a boundary wall with huge towers (gopurams) above each wall's central entryway.

The most prominent landmark in Kumbhakonam is a temple bathing (snana) pond, not a temple.

Every twelve years, a celebration is conducted in the tank, during which the water in the tank is said to become the Ganges.

In 1992, an estimated 400,000 people attended the event, with 48 individuals sadly died in a stampede.

The Swami Malai temple, one of the six temples dedicated to the deity Skanda, is located just outside of town.


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Hinduism - What Is A Garbhagrha In Hindu Temple Arch itecture?


 (“womb-house”) The garbhagrha is the inner sanctuary of a temple in traditional Hindu architecture, which houses the image of the temple's principal deity.

The garbhagrha was positioned just below the peak of the tallest tower of the Nagara architectural style common in northern and eastern India, in which the whole temple edifice culmiinates in one highest point (shikhara).

The garbhagrha's position is identified by a tower taller than the rest of the roof in the Dravida style seen in southern India—in which temples are shorter but tend to spread over wide distances.

 

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Hinduism - What Is The Dravida Style Of Architecture?

 

 


The Nagara and the Veshara are the other two evolved styles in medieval Hindu temple construction. 

Southern India, notably the contemporary state of Tamil Nadu, is home to the Dravida style. 

Unlike the Nagara style, which emphasizes an uninterrupted verticality culminating in a single high peak, the Dravida style emphasizes consecutive strata via a sequence of horizontal tiers. 

Although older southern Indian temples, such as the Rajrajeshvar Temple in Tanjore, had one central tower, the emphasis moved in the twelfth century to the construction of walls surrounding the temple's complicated perimeters. 

At the cardinal points of these walls were massive gopurams or central gates, which were generally the temple's largest constructions by a long shot. 

The enclosed space within the temple complex was frequently huge, such as the estimated 500 acres of Shrirangam's temple, yet the majority of the architecture was just one level. 

(However, the temple's major images would be surrounded by higher towers.) This diminished focus on soaring height was compensated in evolved specimens of the Dravida style by its great horizontal spread. 

The Ranganathaswamy temple at Shrirangam and the Minakshi temple in Madurai are the outstanding specimens of this later form. 



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