Showing posts with label Dussehra. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Dussehra. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is The Hindu Practice Of Worship of Tools?

 



Ayudha Pooja is a ritual historically done by members of specific artisan communities on the festival of Dussehra.

There are two different charter stories associated with this celebration, both of which depict the victory of good over evil.

It is commemorated as the day when the hero Rama defeated the demon Ravana, as well as the Goddess's victory over a demon called Mahishasura.

For the craftsmen, such worship symbolizes the value of their instruments as a way of earning a living, and it is also thought that such propitiation would ensure prosperity the following year.

Weapons Worship is a term used to describe the worship of weapons.

On the holiday of Dussehra, a popular ritual among the warrior classes used to be performed (usually occurring within October and November).

There are two separate founding stories for this event, both of which celebrate the victory of good over evil.

It is commemorated as the day when the hero Rama defeated the evil Ravana, as well as the Goddess's victory over a demon called Mahishasura.

Given the martial tone of both charter stories, it's easy to understand how it'd be connected with soldiers and combat, and therefore a day to worship one's weapons as a symbol of the god.

According to traditional belief, any activity undertaken on this festival day would unfailingly succeed, hence Dussehra has long been a favorite day for military campaigns to begin.

Because Dussehra falls after the conclusion of the monsoon rains, when travel is practically impossible, it is also a good time from a strategic standpoint.


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Hinduism - What Is Vijaya Dashami?

 

Vijaya Dashami is a Hindu festival commemorating the Lord's Victory Or Vijaya.("tenth victory")

Vijayadashami marks the culmination of Durga Puja in India's southern, eastern, northeastern, and some northern areas, commemorating goddess Durga's triumph over the buffalo monster Mahishasura to restore and defend dharma.

Lord Rama, Lord Vishnu's eighth avatar, is said to have vanquished the ten-headed monster Ravana in this famed Hindu festival. 

Lord Rama traveled to Ravana's realm with his brother Larkshman and devotee Hanuman to battle him and bring back Sita, Rama's wife.

 The holiday of Dussehra, which occurs on the tenth day of the lunar month, is known by another name.

According to Hindu mythology, Dussehra is celebrated after Navratri because Lord Ram is said to have worshipped Goddess Durga before embarking on his quest to slay Ravana, as advised by Lord Vishnu. 

The event commemorates Lord Ram's triumph over Lankan ruler Ravana (the 10-headed demon).

The festival has two mythological charters, one with the god Rama and the other with the Goddess, and both myths lead to this day as the day when the deity achieves ultimate triumph.


~Kiran Atma


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Hinduism - What Is Dussehra Or Dushera?


("10 days") 

One of the most significant celebrations of the year, held on the tenth day of the bright (waxing) half of the lunar month of Ashvin (September–October). 

The holiday, also known as Vijaya Dashami ("Victory Tenth"), commemorates the triumph of virtue over evil. 

Both of the festival's founding tales depict the final victory of virtue over evil. 

One charter is based on Goddess mythology, and it commemorates the day when Durga (the Hindu Mother Goddess) slays the buffalo-demon Mahishasura. 

This tale is from the Devimahatmya, and it represents the text's core theme—the goddess is created to defeat Mahishasura when the gods are unable, and the text's climax is the battle between the two. 

Given that the nine days leading up to Dussehra are the autumn Navaratri, or "nine nights" dedicated in Goddess worship, it seems reasonable that the tenth and final day be celebrated by the climax event in the Devimahatmya, the Goddess's most significant source of mythology. 

The second founding tale for this festival comes from a completely different source: Rama (Vishnu's seventeenth avatar). 

This is the day when Rama kills Ravana (the demon king of Lanka) and reclaims Sita (Rama's bride) from captivity. 

On the night of Dussehra, gigantic effigies of Ravana and his son Meghanada (an epithet of Indrajit) are burned, and these effigies are sometimes accompanied by pyrotechnics to boost their pyrotechnic capability. 

The Ramayana (the Sanskrit epic), also known as the Ram Lila, is often performed at this time of year. 

In some situations, this lasts ten days, finishing on Dussehra; in others (such as the Ram Lila in Benares, the holy city on the Ganges River's banks), it lasts a month, with Dussehra commemorating Ravana's death. 

Dussehra is a very auspicious day, and it is widely believed that whatever started on this day would prosper. 

Dussehra is therefore a popular time to start big initiatives, start new pursuits, or create organizations, even if it is merely a token start. 

Dussehra also symbolizes the start of the cold season, when the scorching heat has passed and the monsoon rains have arrived, bringing better weather for military activity. 

Both founding stories are linked to battles and conquests, and the regal and martial classes used to celebrate Dussehra in especially. 

Soldiers were expected to worship their guns during Dussehra. 

Because of the festival's martial connections and the certainty that whatever started on that day would succeed, it was also the day of choice for monarchs to send forth soldiers to attack adjacent lands. 

Even though the emperor no longer reigns, one of the most spectacular festivities takes place in Mysore, where the sovereign preside over the event in his customary role as king. 

The other major celebration is at Kulu, when all of the region's deities go to Kulu to participate in the event (along with hordes of their human retainers). 



You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.