Showing posts with label Dwaraka. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Dwaraka. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Are The Yadava?

 


The tribe from whom the deity Krishna is claimed to have sprung and over which he reigned after establishing his dominion in the city of Dwaraka, according to Hindu legend.

Between the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries in Indian history, the Yadava dynasty ruled the Deccan area in present Maharashtra.

This is the name of a specific jati in northern Indian culture, an endogamous social grouping organized (and whose social position dictated) by the group's hereditary vocation.

The Yadavas had a low social status in previous generations, but they have recently risen to prominence in politics—Mulayam Singh Yadav has twice been elected chief minister of Uttar Pradesh and has also served as India's defense minister; Laloo Prasad Yadav has served as chief minister of Bihar (either directly or indirectly through his wife) throughout the 1990s.


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Hinduism - Who Is Rukmini In The Hindu Pantheon?

 

Krishna's chief queen in his later life as the king of Dwaraka, according to Hindu mythology.

Rukmini is the daughter of the Vidarbha king, and while she and her parents want her to marry Krishna, her brother, Krishna's bitter enemy, arranges for her to marry his friend Shishupala.

Krishna takes Rukmini away in his chariot on her wedding day, with all the guests present.

They are married and have ten sons, according to tradition.


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Hinduism - Who Are The Kitawara?

 

One of four major organizational groups of the Dashanami Sanyasis, renunciant ascetics who are devotees (bhakta) of the god Shiva; the other three divisions are Bhuriwara, Bhogawara, and Anandawara.

Each of these organizations is based in one of the four monastic centers (maths) that philosopher Shankaracharya is said to have founded.

Each of the 10 Dashanami divisions is linked to one of the four Vedas, one of the "great utterances" (mahavakyas) conveying the ultimate truth, a specific ascetic trait, and one of the four Vedas.

The Kitawara group is associated with the Sharada math at Dwaraka, and so with India's western quarter.

The Sama Veda is the Veda of the Kitawara.

Their mahavakya is "tattvamasi" ("That thou are"), and their ascetic quality is eating just a little amount of food.

Tirtha and Ashrama are the Dashanami divisions connected with this group. 



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Hinduism - Where Is Dwaraka?

 


Sacred city (tirtha) on Gujarat's western coast, on the Arabian Sea's beach. 

Dwaraka is well known in mythology as the capital city of Krishna's empire, where he is said to have resided in the years after the Mahabharata war. 

The Dwarakanath Temple, dedicated to Krishna in his incarnation as the "Lord of Dwaraka," is the most prominent shrine in Dwaraka. 

Dwaraka is also one of India's four dhams ("divine abodes"), holy locations that roughly define the country's physical borders; the other three are Badrinath, Puri, and Rameshvaram. 

The Sharada math, one of the four Dashanami Sanyasi maths (monastic institutions) supposedly founded by the philosopher Shankaracharya, is also located in Dwaraka. 

The Kitawara group of the Dashanami Sanyasis is headquartered at the Sharada math, one of the four primary organizational groups, each of which is located at one of the mathematics. 

Dwaraka is sanctified by a network of legendary and theological ties, as are many other Hindu holy locations. 



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