Showing posts with label Gaudiya Vaishnava. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Gaudiya Vaishnava. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is Nirguna In Hindu Spirituality?


 ("devoid of attributes") The highest feature of heavenly reality's epithet.

Many Hindu traditions hold that God is ultimately devoid of traits and attributes, transcending all particularity and being superior to any qualifying form.

The Upanishads, the theoretical religious scriptures that constitute the most recent component of the Vedas, and philosophical traditions founded on the Upanishads, such as Advaita Vedanta, are the first to express this notion.

Certain Hindu theistic traditions, such as the Gaudiya Vaishnava religious group, disagree with this idea, believing that a specific deity—in this instance, Krishna—is the Ultimate Reality.


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Hinduism - What Or Who Is Considered Nirakara In Hindu Spirituality?


 ("devoid of shape") The highest feature of heavenly reality's epithet.

Many Hindu traditions hold that God is essentially formless, transcending all particularity and being superior to any particular depiction.

This view is originally expressed in the Upanishads, the speculative religious scriptures that represent the most recent portion of the Vedas, and is promoted by Upanishad-based intellectual systems like Advaita Vedanta.

Certain Hindu theistic traditions, such as the Gaudiya Vaishnava religious group, disagree with this idea, believing that a specific deity—in this instance, Krishna—is the Ultimate Reality.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.




Hinduism - Who Are The Goswamis Of The Gaudiya Vaishnava Religious Group?

 


Jiva, Goswami (ca. late 16th c.) Along with his uncles Sanatana Goswami and Rupa Goswami, he was a prominent role in the Gaudiya Vaishnava religious group.

Despite the fact that the poet-saint Chaitanya formed the Gaudiya Vaishnavas, it was the Goswamis who gave discipline and systematic reasoning to Chaitanya's ecstatic devotionalism.

The Goswamis were originally from southern India, but their family had relocated to northern India.

When Rupa and Sanatana met Chaitanya, their lives were changed forever.

Chaitanya sent the brothers to Brindavan, the hamlet where Krishna is said to have spent his infancy, with orders to reside there and reclaim it as a sacred site.

The three Goswamis remained there for decades, recovering holy locations (tirthas), erecting temples, and, most all, establishing the Gaudiya Vaishnava community's principles and institutions.

Jiva was a versatile scholar who wrote on a variety of topics related to Vaishnava devotion, but he is most recognized for his metaphysical writings, which give the community's conceptual foundations.

Sushil Kumar De, Early History of the Vaishnava Faith and Movement in Bengal, from Sanskrit and Bengali Sources, 1961, is a good source of knowledge.

Rupa Goswami, Rupa Goswami, Rupa Goswami, Rupa Gos (ca. mid-16th c.) Along with his brother Sanatana Goswami and nephew Jiva Goswami, he was a follower of the Bengali saint Chaitanya, and was a crucial player in the creation of the Gaudiya Vaishnava society.

Despite the fact that the poet-saint Chaitanya formed the Gaudiya Vaishnavas, it was the Goswamis who gave discipline and systematic reasoning to Chaitanya's ecstatic devotionalism.

According to records, the Goswamis were brahmins whose ancestors came from the Karnataka area.

Rupa and Sanatana were in the service of a local Muslim monarch in Bengal, where the family had settled.

When Rupa and Sanatana met Chaitanya, though, their lives were changed forever.

Chaitanya sent the brothers to Brindavan, the hamlet where Krishna is said to have spent his infancy, with orders to reside there and reclaim it as a sacred site.

The three Goswamis remained there for decades, recovering holy locations (tirthas), erecting temples, and, most all, establishing the Gaudiya Vaishnava community's principles and institutions.

Rupa was a devout follower of Krishna (bhakta), but she was also a playwright and a scholar.

He concentrated on examining bhakti as an emotional experience in addition to composing poetry as a medium for expressing devotion to Krishna.

He is well known for enumerating the five forms of devotion, which describe the many ways to experience God's love.

Sushil Kumar De, Early History of the Vaishnava Faith and Movement in Bengal, 1961; and Shrivatsa Goswami, "Radha," in John Stratton Hawley and Donna Wulff (eds. ), The Divine Consort, 1982, for further information.


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Hinduism - Who Are The Gaudiya Vaishnava?


Chaitanya (1486–1533), a Bengali saint, created a religious society.

It gets its name from the old Bengali term Gauda, which emphasizes the adoration of the deity Vishnu.

Chaitanya's intense devotionalism is the foundation of the community's religious activities and beliefs.

He said that reciting Krishna's name over and over again, frequently while singing and dancing in the streets, is the way to holy ecstasy.

Chaitanya's religious charisma attracted a large number of disciples, the most prominent of whom were the Goswamis—the brothers Rupa and Sanatana, as well as their nephew Jiva.

The Goswamis moved to Brindavan, the place where Krishna is said to have grown up, under Chaitanya's order.

The descendants of the Goswamis still reside there.

The Goswamis at Brindavan went about organizing and systematizing Chaitanya's ecstatic experience's philosophical underpinning.

Despite their perception of themselves as Chaitanya's slaves, they play an equal role in the community's growth.

The primary intellectual tenet of the Goswamis was achintyabhedabheda, the belief that the Supreme Divinity (Krishna) and the human person share a "inconceivable identity and difference" that makes the soul both equal to and distinct from the divinity.

The Gaudiya Vaishnava group is also known for its in-depth examination of devotion (bhakti) as a spiritual experience.

As five kinds of devotion, they identified the many ways to feel God's love.

Sushil Kumar De, Early History of the Vaishnava Faith and Movement in Bengal, 1961, is a good source of knowledge. 


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.