Showing posts with label Gorakhnath. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Gorakhnath. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Was Matsyendranath?


According to legend, he was the master of the sage Gorakhnath and the founder of the Nathpanthis, a community of renunciant ascetics who are Shiva worshipers (bhakta).

Minanath is another name for Matsyendranath.

Matsyendranath obtained his training from Shiva himself, according to the Nathpanthi legend, by assuming the shape of a fish (the terms matsya and mina both mean "fish") and listening while Shiva was instructing his wife Parvati.

See George Weston Briggs, Gorakhnath and the Kanphata Yogis, 1973, for more information on Gorakhnath and the Nath tradition.

Also see tantra.


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Hinduism - Who Is A Jogi?

 


 (adept) (variant of yogi) An appellation for ascetics of many kinds.

It often refers to the Nathpanthis, disciples of Gorakhnath, the instructor.

The fact that yoga, especially hatha yoga, is one of the key foci in their religious life has earned them the moniker "yogis." 

The Aghoris may also be referred to by this word.

 


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Hinduism - Who Is Gorakhnath?

 

Gorakhnath was a medieval yogi and wonderworker who founded the Nathpanthi ascetics in the 13th century.

Gorakhnath was undoubtedly a historical figure, and his teacher's name was Matsyendranath (also known as Minanath).

However, tales of his life claim that he performed so many miracles and marvels that they cannot be believed.

Since the Maharashtrian poet-saint Jnaneshvar (1275–1296?) characterized his own spiritual teacher as one of Gorakhnath's students, he is thought to have lived in the early thirteenth century.

Gorakhnath is revered not just as a magician and a wonderworker, but also as the creator of the Gorakhshatakam, according to legend.

This work is a religious treatise that teaches Nathpanthi ascetics how to do a special style of yoga.

This yogic practice's ultimate purpose is to change the physical body's perishable constituents into everlasting ones.

The spiritual precepts in this work are congruent with those of the Nathpanthi ascetics who claim to be Gorakhnath's students, whether or not Gorakhnath wrote it.

Gorakhnath and his most successful disciples, according to mythology, have never died, and their triumph over death is a symbol of their spiritual achievement.

Despite its antiquity, George Weston Briggs' Gorakhnath and the Kanphata Yogis, 1973, and Shashibhushan B. Dasgupta's Obscure Religious Cults, 1962, are the most comprehensive sources on Gorakhnath and his followers.

 


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Hinduism - What Is The Gorakhshatakam And The Gorakhs? Who Is Gorakhnath?

 



Gorakhs ("The Hundred of Gorakh") Gorakhnath is credited with writing this text.

Although his authorship is unprovable, the teachings of the Nathpanthi ascetics, who claim to be his students, are constant.

The passage includes 101 verses in at least one of its variants, as translated by Briggs, rather than the 100 verses suggested by the title.

The Gorakhshatakam explains the form of yoga practiced by the Nathpanthi ascetics, in which the main theme is the polar opposites' unification.

It starts with a lesson on the subtle body's structure, which is an alternative physiological system that exists on a separate level of existence than coarse matter yet has certain similarities to the material body.

The subtle body is represented by a series of six psychic centers (chakras) that run nearly parallel to the spine.

The corporeal abodes of the two divine principles, Shiva (consciousness) and Shakti (power), are located above and below these centers (power).

The seeker aspires to awaken kundalini, a dormant spiritual force dwelling in the shakti, and bring it into connection with Shiva at the top of the head.

This practice's ultimate goal is to obtain mastery over the forces that impact one's body, enabling one to become cleansed and immortal.

 


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Hinduism - Who Is Gopichand?

 

The princely protagonist of The Song of Gopichand, an allegorical tale popular in northern India and even Bengal, where it is known as The Song of Manik Chandra.

The narrative depicts Gopichand's struggles, in which he loses his kingship due to the whims of destiny but finally reclaims it after several hardships and losses.

Aside from the tale, the Nathpanthis, an ascetic society reportedly created by Gorakhnath, are also mentioned in the song.

Some in this group thought that by improving their bodies via yoga, they would become eternal.

This thought is expressed in the song by Gopichand's mother Mayana, who has control over Death himself.

Mayana's religious preceptor is described as a low-caste sweeper in some versions of the narrative, but in others it is the sage Gorakhnath himself.

G.A. Grierson published two versions of this song in the Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, the first in 1878 and the second in 1885.


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