Showing posts with label Gotra. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Gotra. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Is Vishvamitra In The Hindu Pantheon?

 


One of the Seven Sages in Hindu mythology, whose names denote exogamous clan "lineages" (gotra; exogamous clans allow members to marry outside their own clan); the others are Gautama, Bharadvaja, Kashyapa, Bhrgu, Atri, and Vasishtha.

All brahmins are said to be descended from these seven sages, with each family receiving their progenitor's name as their gotra name.

Marriage inside the gotra is outlawed in contemporary times, thus these gotra divides are still crucial.

The new bride takes on her husband's gotra as part of her new identity after their marriage.

Vishvamitra is most well-known for his long-running quarrel with the sage Vasishtha, which has resulted in several battles.

The rivalry arises because of the kshatriyas and brahmins' differing social position.

Vishvamitra is a king who visits the woodland ashram of the brahmin Vasishtha with a contingent of retainers.

Vishvamitra is astounded by Vasishtha's cow, the Kama dhenu's capacity to feed everyone when he requests food.

Vishvamitra attempts to purchase the Kamadhenu first, then tries to seize it by force, but Vasishtha's tapas defeats his henchmen (ascetic practices).

Vishvamitra acknowledges defeat and undertakes ascetic activities in order to generate his own strength.

Two of their most famous fights are over King Trishanku and his son, Harishchandra; in both cases, the actual problem is the sages' mutual hatred.

Marriage bans may also be referred to in this context.


Kiran Atma


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Hinduism - What Is A Gotra?

 

Exogamous lineages are referred to as Gotra.

Although the prestige associated with certain lineages has inspired other twice-born tribes to adopt them, lineages are especially emphasized among brahmins.

The name literally means "cow pen," and the family is therefore linked to a certain herd of cattle.

Brahmins were said to be derived from the seven sages Kashyapa, Vasishtha, Bhrgu, Gautama, Atri, Bharadvaja, and Vishvamitra, with each family adopting the name of the guru who was thought to be their progenitor as their gotra.

Marriages were the only time it was actually significant, since marriage inside the gotra was forbidden.

A lady would take her husband's gotra as part of her new identity after marriage.

Because brahmins were aware of this technique, possessing a gotra became a prestige symbol.

This prompted other twice-born peoples to follow in the footsteps of the brahmins and embrace gotras as well. 


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.