Showing posts with label Hanuman Chalisa. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Hanuman Chalisa. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is Hanuman Jayanti?


Hanuman Jayanti is a Hindu festival commemorating the birth of Lord Hanuman.

Hanuman's birthday is celebrated with a festival.

This is celebrated on the full moon in the lunar month of Chaitra (March–April) in southern India, and on the fourteenth day of the dark (waning) half of the lunar month of Kartik (October–November) in northern India.

The latter date corresponds to Shivaratri, Shiva's most significant festival, which takes place on the fourteenth day of the waning half-month Phalgun (usually in February).

Because Hanuman is often seen as an avatar or "incarnation" of Shiva, who has come to earth to serve the god-king Rama, the two celebrations are linked.

Hanuman is a highly important god in ordinary religious life, with a large following, despite his mythic status as a devoted and powerful servant of Rama.

Although there are no official ceremonies for his birthday, his followers (bhakta) sometimes observe it with worship, celebratory procession, and devotional reading of religious books, notably the Hanuman Chalisa and the Ramayana. 


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Hinduism - What Is The Hanuman Chalisa?


Hanuman Chalisa (literally, "Hanuman's Forty").

In Hindi, forty poetry stanzas in honor of the deity Hanuman.

Tulsidas (1532–1623), well known as the composer of the Ramcharitmanas, a vernacular translation of the epic Ramayana, is credited with writing it, according to a signature line (bhanita) at the conclusion of the work.

Short poems like the Hanuman Chalisa are often sung as a devotional act or as an established element of worship, and many individuals can memorize the text off the top of their heads.

The passage is written in the chaupai meter, which is the Ramcharitmanas' most common meter.

Hanuman's physical characteristics are described first, followed by his devotion to Rama and his heroic acts in the Ramayana.

The last words reaffirm Hanuman's potency, promise advantages if the verses are spoken, and reclaim Tulsidas' longing for Hanuman to stay in his heart.

 

You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.