Showing posts with label Hindu Astrology. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Hindu Astrology. Show all posts

Hinduism - How Does The Zodiac In Hindu Astrology Compare With Western Astrology?

 


The signs of the zodiac in Indian astrology (jyotisha) are almost similar to those in Western astrology, and it is widely assumed that the Greek zodiac was carried to India through Greek kingdoms in modern Afghanistan in the first to third centuries.

The Indian zodiac uses Dhanus ("bow") instead of Sagittarius, Makara (a sea monster that is commonly mistaken for a crocodile) instead of Capricorn, and Kumbha ("[water] pot") instead of Aquarius.

Each of the twelve signs, like Western astrology, has its own set of qualities that those born under them are infused with.

Although both begin with the sign of Aries, the two systems vary significantly in how they calculate the yearly beginning point.

The Western astrological zodiac starts on the spring equinox, with the sign of Aries being the first sign.

According to Indian legend, the zodiac begins when the sun touches the midway of a group of stars known as Ashvini.

It is therefore based on the sun's position in relation to the fixed stars, while the Western zodiac is based on the sun's position in relation to the earth—that is, when it meets the equator—and hence is independent of the fixed stars.

These disparities have resulted in a discrepancy between the two systems, which is now more than three weeks apart—Aries begins on March 21 in the Western zodiac, but not until around April 14 in the Indian zodiac.

This inconsistency may also be found in the accounts of Makara Sankranti and Karka Sankranti, which are considered the winter and summer solstices yet fall in the second weeks of January and July, respectively.

Given the three-week time gap, it's not surprising that the astrological calculations between these two systems diverge significantly.


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Hinduism - What Is A Yantra? What Does Yantra Mean?

 

 

Yantra is a Sanskrit word that means "circle of life" or (“instrument”).

The term yantra most usually refers to a symbolic design, generally thought to impart magic or spiritual power on those who know how to employ it in astrology (jyotisha) and tantra, a secret, ritually based religious practice.

In other circumstances, such yantras are seen to represent an aniconic form of a deity, like in the example of the Shriyantra or Shrichakra, which is employed in rituals to worship the goddess Tripura Sundari.

In an astrological context, the yantras of the different planets are utilized in rituals to modify their effects, mainly to control or lessen the power of planets thought to be malefic or inauspicious.


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Hinduism - What Is Sunday Called In Sanskrit? How Are Sundays Perceived In Hindu Astrology Or Jyotisha?

 

 (Ravivar) The first day of the Hindu week, with the sun as its ruling planet (and god) (ravi).

Sunday is considered generally auspicious but not exceptionally strong as a day, owing to the fact that although the sun is recognized as a god, it is not usually worshiped as a principal deity.


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Hinduism - What Are The Attributes Of The Sun In Hindu Astrology Or Jyotisha?

 

A planet linked with strength and vigor in Hindu astrology (jyotisha), however it may also be evil, probably representing the unrelenting destructive force of the Indian sun.

The sun's energy makes it a powerful planet, and the sun's location in the zodiac, as in Western astrology, plays an important part in determining a person's natal horoscope (janampatrika).

Sunday is ruled by the sun, a day of the week that isn't particularly auspicious or inauspicious.



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Hinduism - Who Is Rahu In The Hindu Pantheon, Astrology, And Mythology?

 

In Hindu astrology (jyotisha), a wicked "planet" that has no analogue in Western astrology and was formerly the head of a demon.

According to legend, when the gods are drinking the nectar of immortality that they had churned from the ocean of milk, the demon Sainhikeya disguises himself and enters their midst.

The sun and moon alert Vishnu, who uses his discus to chop off the demon's head as the monster starts to drink.

However, after coming into touch with the nectar, Sainhikeya's two parts become eternal.

Rahu is born from the severed head, while Ketu is born from the beheaded body.

Rahu is the ascending node of the moon, rather than an actual planet.

This is the point in the sky when the moon's northward route crosses with the sun's path, resulting in an eclipse.

Rahu has a special dislike for the sun and moon, whom he blames for his death, and wants to devour them anytime he sees them in the sky.

He always succeeds, but they escape unhurt through Rahu's severed neck since he no longer has a body to digest them.

The traditional reason for solar and lunar eclipses is that they are associated with the wicked Rahu, which has led to eclipses being regarded as particularly unfavorable events.

Also see Tortoise avatar.


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Hinduism - What Are The Indications Of The Moon In Jyotisha Or Hindu Astrology?


 A planet connected with fecundity (fertility) in Hindu astrology (jyotisha), albeit its aspect may be either beneficent or malicious—benevolent with the waxing moon, and malevolent with the declining moon.

The full moon is regarded the most fortunate moment of the lunar month.

The new moon, on the other hand, is seen as a ritually uncertain and hence potentially deadly moment.

During the week, the moon rules over Monday, which is widely seen as a lucky day and one that Shiva honors as Somnath, the Lord of the Moon.


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Hinduism - What Are Benefic And Malefic Effects Of Planet Mercury In Hindu Astrology?

 

Based on its brief orbit around the sun, a planet connected with mental speed, memory, and education in Hindu astrology (jyotisha).

Despite these usually beneficial characteristics, Mercury is seen as a weak planet, readily swayed by other planets or its location in the natal horoscope toward kindness or malevolence (janampatrika).

Mercury's connection to the mind shows that the mind's abilities may be used for good or evil.

Mercury is supposed to dominate Wednesday throughout the week; this day is neither particularly auspicious or inauspicious, reflecting the planet's light abilities.


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Hinduism - How Are Gemstones Used In Hindu Astrology?


Gemstones are employed in Hindu astrology to increase, neutralize, or oppose the celestial effect of certain planets.

The sun (ruby), moon (pearl), Mars (coral), Mercury (emerald), Jupiter (topaz), Venus (diamond), Saturn (sapphire), Rahu (agate), and Ketu (agate) are the nine planets in Hindu astrology, each of which is associated with a different gemstone: the sun (ruby), moon (pearl), Mars (coral), Mercury (emerald), Jupiter (topaz), Venus (dia (turquoise).

Each of these nine planets is regarded as a minor god with its own personality and qualities.

When choosing which gemstones to wear, certain astrological elements must be taken into account, particularly the position of the planets in one's natal horoscope (janampatrika), which is said to show each planet's influence.

To give the gemstones their effectiveness over their planetary equivalents, they are worn in rings with the base of the stone in touch with the skin.



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