Showing posts with label Hindu Calendar. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Hindu Calendar. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is Yogini Ekadashi? When Is It Observed In The Hindu Calendar?

 


The eleventh day (ekadashi) of the dark (waning) half of the lunar month of Ashadh (June–July) is a religious celebration.

This, like other eleventh-day celebrations, is devoted to the worship of Vishnu, especially in his avatar as Narayana.

Most Hindu holidays have mandated ceremonies, which generally include fasting (upavasa) and devotion, and frequently promise particular rewards if performed faithfully.

Giving presents to needy brahmins is the recommended activity on this day; following the festival sincerely takes away the sin of chopping down a pipal tree (ashvattha) and also brings one birth in heaven.


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Hinduism - What Is A Hindu Year In The Hindu Lunar Calendar?

 


Both the solar and lunar calendars are used to establish the Hindu ritual year.

There are two indigenous Hindu solar year estimates, both of which feature twelve solar months, in addition to the Gregorian calendar and the common era.

These months correlate to the twelve zodiac signs in northern India, and they vary as the sun goes through them.

The year starts when the sun enters Aries, as it does in the Western zodiac, albeit in Indian astrology, this shift occurs around April 14, rather than March 21, as it does in Euro-American astrology.

A similar solar calendar exists in southern India, with names derived from the names of certain nakshatras or lunar asterisms.

Apart from the solar months, the solar year is split into two parts depending on the sun's movement: the Uttarayana for when the sun is travelling north and the Dakshinayana for when the sun is going south.

On Makara Sankranti, January 14, the sun starts its northward trip, which is considered the more auspicious period; six months later, on Karka Sankranti, July 14, the sun begins its southbound journey, which is considered the less auspicious time.


The lunar calendar, which has twelve lunar months, is far more important for religious purposes:


  1. Chaitra (March–April), 
  2. Baisakh (April–May), 
  3. Jyeshth (May–June), 
  4. Ashadh (June–July), 
  5. Shravan (July–August), 
  6. Bhadrapada (August–September), 
  7. Ashvin (September–October), 
  8. Kartik (October–November), 
  9. Margashirsha (November–December), 
  10. Paush (December–January), 
  11. Magh (January–February), 


The calendar in northern India normally starts on the first day of the brilliant half of Chaitra, and ends on the first day of the dark half of the same month.

The festivals designated by this lunar calendar happen at various times each year in relation to the solar calendar since these lunar months are based on the phases of the moon (ending with the full moon in northern India and the new moon in southern India).

Because the twelve lunar months take around 354 solar days to complete, each lunar year starts eleven days sooner than the previous one.

This mismatch is remedied every 212 years by the insertion of an additional lunar month, known as the intercalary month, which brings the solar and lunar calendars into broad agreement.

The intercalary month is added to each lunar month during which the sun does not enter a new zodiac sign, allowing it to fall in any month of the year.

Although the solar calendar is less significant in daily life, it aids in maintaining the basic correlation between the lunar calendar and the periodic festivals linked with it.

The three primary seasons (hot, monsoon, and cool) have strong linkages with the festival calendar, at least in northern India.

The chilly season, from October and February, is the most ritually busy period; in many locations, this is also the time after the harvest, when many people have more time and money to devote to religious observances.

Many ceremonies are related with heat in the hot season, but the rainy season, as a period of hazard, is often associated with rites of protection.


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Hinduism - What Is A Hindu Week In The Hindu Calendar?

 


The Hindu week, like the European calendar, has seven days.

Each day has a governing planet, is associated with one or more presiding deities, and is seen as more or less auspicious (in line with the overall Indian attitude toward time).

Tuesday and Saturday are the unluckiest days, since they are associated with the planets Mars and Saturn, respectively.

Monday (moon), Thursday (Jupiter), and Friday (Venus) are considered fortunate days since these planets are considered compassionate and strong.

Sunday (the sun) and Wednesday (Mercury) have no significant connections since, although benign, these bodies are nevertheless seen as having a limited impact.


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Hinduism - What Is Vijaya Ekadashi?

 



The eleventh day (ekadashi) of the dark (waning) half of the lunar month of Phalgun (February–March) is a religious celebration.

This is the eleventh-day observance devoted to the worship of Vishnu, as is the case with all eleventh-day observances.

Most Hindu holidays have pre-determined ceremonies, which generally include fasting (upavasa) and devotion, and frequently offer particular rewards for loyal participation.

Those taking this vow should fill an earthen pot with the seven varieties of grain, place an image of Vishnu on top of the pot, and recite the names of Vishnu for twenty-four hours.

The pot of grain should be handed to a brahmin on the twelfth.

In terms of outcomes, it is stated that diligently honoring this festival would provide vijaya (victory) over poverty and sadness.


~Kiran Atma


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Hinduism - What Is Sunday Called In Sanskrit? How Are Sundays Perceived In Hindu Astrology Or Jyotisha?

 

 (Ravivar) The first day of the Hindu week, with the sun as its ruling planet (and god) (ravi).

Sunday is considered generally auspicious but not exceptionally strong as a day, owing to the fact that although the sun is recognized as a god, it is not usually worshiped as a principal deity.


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Hinduism - What Is Rishi Panchami In The Hindu Calendar?

 


Rishi Panchami  is a Hindu festival. The fifth day (panchami) of the light (waxing) half of the lunar month of Bhadrapada (August–September) is celebrated as a festival.

Bhrgu, Pulastya, Kratu, Pulaha, Marichi, Atri, and Vasishtha are the Seven Sages (rishis) born by Brahma, and this festival is devoted to them.

On this day, it is stated that worshiping these seven sages would bring wealth and pleasure.


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Hinduism - What Is Radhashtami In The Hindu Calendar?

 


Radhashtami  ("Radha's eighth") is a Hindu festival.

The festival takes place on the eighth day of the bright (waxing) half of the lunar month of Bhadrapada (August–September); this day is commemorated as Krishna's consort Radha's birthday.

Radha is seen differently by different Vaishnava religious communities: for some, she is a human woman who represents the ideal devotee (bhakta) who sacrifices everything to be with her beloved, while for others, she is the queen of heaven and an equal to Krishna himself.

In any instance, her proximity to him is shown by the fact that she was born in the same month and lunar day as Krishna, albeit on the opposite side of the month.

The Radhashtami celebration is especially popular in Barsana, the Braj area hamlet where Radha is claimed to have been born.


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Hinduism - When Is Purushottama Observed? Who IS Revered As Purushottama?

 


When the intercalary month falls within the lunar month of Ashadh, it is observed as a religious observance.

The intercalary month is a lunar month that is placed into the calendar every thirty months or so to keep the solar and lunar calendars in sync.

It starts after any "normal" lunar month in which the sun has not yet shifted into the next zodiac sign, and adopts the name of the previous month.

The intercalary month is regarded unlucky since it has an atypical phenomenon, and the most popular vernacular word for it is malamasa, which means "impure month." When the additional month happens in the lunar month of Ashadh, however, worshippers of the deity Vishnu (bhakta) see it as an extremely sacred period devoted to Vishnu in his avatar as Purushottama ("best of men"), and treat it as such.

This month, Vaishnavas study holy scriptures, sing Vishnu's glorious names, and engage in various forms of devotion.

The month of Ashadh, as well as its intercalary month, are particularly significant for the Jagannath temple in Puri, whose presiding god, Jagannath, is regarded a form of Krishna, and hence a manifestation of Vishnu.

Every year, the Rath Yatra event is held in Puri during the month of Ashadh, and in years when the intercalary month occurs in Ashadh, fresh representations of Jagannath and his siblings are produced.


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Hinduism - When Is The Mauni Amavasya In The Hindu Calendar?

 

Mauni Amavasya takes place on the new moon day (amavasya) in the lunar month of Magh (January–February).

The day is spent in quiet by those who observe this holiday.

Silence is viewed as one of the religious disciplines that helps to improve spiritual awareness.

The term mauni (speech less) is derived from the word muni (sage).

Bathing (snana) in the Ganges (or another holy river) is considered meritorious throughout the full month of Magh.

Bathing on the new moon's day has a higher level of holiness.

The city of Allahabad, at the confluence of the Ganges and the Yamuna Rivers, is a well-known location for this ritual.



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Hinduism - When Is The Month Of Magh In The Hindu Calendar?

 

Magh is the eleventh month of the lunar year, generally occurring between January and February, according to the lunar calendar, which is used to calculate most Hindu religious events.

The Magh Mela, a month-long bathing (snana) celebration held at the confluence of the Ganges and Yamuna rivers in Allahabad, takes place throughout the month of Magh.

Sakata Chauth, Shattila Ekadashi, Mauni Amavasya, Vasant Panchami, Bhishma Ashtami, Jaya Ekadashi, Ravidas Jayanti, and Makara Sankranti are the other prominent festivals in Magh.

During Magh, southern India celebrates Pongal and the Float Festival.


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Hinduism - What Is The Structure Of The Lunar Month In The Hindu Calendar?

 

Hindu festivals are defined by a lunar calendar, which divides the year into twelve lunar months.

The lunar month is split into two half with fifteen days each.

The lunar month in northern India starts with the dark (krishna) half of the moon, when it is declining.

The new moon marks the conclusion of this phase, which lasts fifteen days.

The bright (shukla) part of the month, while the moon is waxing, follows.

The full moon marks the conclusion of this phase, which lasts fifteen days.

The first day of the following lunar month is the day after the full moon, and so on.

The name of the month, the half (light or dark), and the lunar day are all used to identify any specific lunar day (1 to 15).

The sequence is inverted in southern India, with the lunar month beginning with the light half and ending with the new moon.

The lunar month, like many Hindu concepts of time, depicts changing moments of auspiciousness and inauspiciousness, with peaks and valleys denoting more or less auspicious times.

With its symbolism of fullness, richness, and light, the full moon is usually fortunate.

It is said that religious ceremonies conducted on this day have the same amount of virtue as those performed over the course of a month.

The new moon is a more confusing moment, with its connotations of darkness and nothingness.

The new moon may be very fortunate at times, such as on the occasion of a Somavati Amavasya (new moon falling on Monday).

The new moon coincides with many significant holidays (such as Diwali).

Regardless, the new moon is less fortunate than the full moon.

Various days are identified with distinct deities within each fort night, and their devotees (bhakta) frequently perform specific ceremonies on those days: The deity Vishnu is honored on the eleventh day (ekadashi), the Goddess on the eighth day (ashtami), the god Shiva on the thirteenth and fourteenth days (trayo dashi) and the god Ganesh on the fourth day (chaturthi).

As previously stated, practically all Hindu celebrations are based on the lunar calendar.

An intercalary month is introduced every 212 years to rectify the disparity between the lunar and solar years (approximately eleven days), and so retain these festivals at around the same time every year.

Although the additional month preserves the calendar in balance, it is thought to be exceedingly inauspicious, maybe due to its rarity.

People take usual measures to protect themselves during unfavorable periods throughout this month, such as deferring new activities until the end of the month and praying to protective deities until the end of the month.


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Hinduism - What Is The Karka Sankranti Festival?

 


Karka Sankranti is the Hindu New Year.

The beginning of the dakshinayana, the six-month period during which the sun travels toward the south, is marked on the Indian calendar by the sun's passage into the zodiac sign of Cancer.

This occurs at the summer solstice (about June 21) in Western astrology, but around July 14 in Indian counting.

The disparity occurs because the two systems commemorate the start of the astrological year in different ways.

The beginning of the year in Western astrology is determined by the sun's position in respect to the earth, which happens on the spring equinox (around March 21).

The beginning of the zodiac in Indian counting occurs when the sun contacts the middle of a group of stars known as Ashvini, and is based on the sun's location in relation to fixed stars.

Unlike Makara Sankranti, which happens six months earlier and marks the start of the sun's northward journey, Karka Sankranti is not observed by notable observances (uttarayana).

The deity Yama, who is death personified, is connected with the southern direction.

As a result, this southerly trend is seen as less favorable than its northern equivalent. 

 

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Hinduism - When Is The Month Of Jyeshth In The Hindu Calendar?


Jyeshth is the third month of the lunar year, generally occurring in May–June, according to the lunar calendar, which is used to calculate most Hindu religious events.

This month is considered the start of the hot season: This month's weather is blistering hot and bone dry.

Achala Ekadashi, Savitri Puja, Ganga Dashahara, and Nirjala Ekadashi are the most important festivals of Jyeshth.



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Hinduism - When Is Janaki Navami In The Hindu Calendar?


The ninth day (navami) of the dark (waning) half of the lunar month of Phalgun (February–March) is the festival.

This event commemorates the birth of Sita, the goddess Rama's bride and the protagonist of the epic Ramayana.

Sita is not born in the traditional way, but rather in a furrow when King Janaka ploughs a field (hence the name Janaki, a female form of Janaka).

Sita is said to be a form of Lakshmi, Vishnu's wife, since she is the wife of Rama, who is an avatar or incarnation of the deity Vishnu.

Sita is regarded as a role model for Indian women because of her complete devotion to her husband; women who execute the appropriate religious procedures for this day are guaranteed children and wealth.

 


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Hinduism - What Is The Significance Of The Full Moon In The Hindu Calendar?

 

Full Moon is described using the terms Purnimasa or Purnima. The full moon is the last day of the lunar month in northern India, although it is frequently regarded the midpoint in southern India. 

In any case, the full moon connotes fullness, completeness, and plenty, and it is always a sign of impending doom. 

The widely held idea that religious merit produced by rituals conducted on the day of a full moon is comparable to that created by rites performed for a whole month is one evidence of its auspiciousness. 


Each lunar month has its own set of festivals, but the most significant are those in:


  • Baisakh (Buddha Purnima), 
  • Ashadh (Guru Purnima), 
  • Shravan (Raksha Bandhan), 
  • Kartik (Kartik Purnima), 
  • and Phalgun (Phalgun Purnima) (Holi).



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Hinduism - What Is The Hindu Festival Calendar?

 

Because just a few Hindu holidays are observed by all Hindus, maintaining an unified festival calendar is difficult. 

The same opposing forces that drive Hindu life also influence festival celebrations. 


  • On the one hand, there are substantial geographical disparities in festival celebrations, and on the other hand, there are huge sectarian distinctions. 
  • Some sectarian holidays are observed only in specific localities, while others are observed across the country. 
  • While most people are aware of most festivals because they are public holidays or are recorded on the calendar, significantly fewer individuals celebrate them as religious holidays. 
  • Finally, certain holidays are so important that they are observed by practically everyone, albeit some people will observe them with significantly more vigor. 
  • Although the Goddess festival known as Navaratri in the autumn is observed throughout the nation, it is observed with special zeal in Bengal, where the religion of the Mother Goddess is greatly revered. 


With these factors in mind, the lunar year's festival calendar is shown below, with the holidays listed in chronological sequence throughout the lunar months. 



The goal of this item is just to set out the calendar of these festivals throughout the year; separate entries for the lunar months and each festival provide more information. 



• Spring Navaratri, Ram Navami, Kamada Ekadashi, Hanuman Jayanti, Chittirai. 

• Chaitra (March–April) Papamochani Ekadashi, Spring Navaratri, Ram Navami, Kamada Ekadashi, Hanuman Jayanti, Chittirai. 

• Shitalashtami, Baruthani Ekadashi, Akshaya Trtiya, Parashuram Jayanti, Narsingh Jayanti, Baisakhi, Mohini Ekadashi, Buddha Purnima (April–May) Shitalashtami, Baruthani Ekadashi, Akshaya Trtiya, Parashuram Jayanti, Narsingh Jayanti, Baisakhi, Mohini Ekad

 • Achala Ekadashi, Savitri Puja, Ganga Dashahara, Nirjala Ekadashi (May–June) 

 • Yogini Ekadashi, Rath Yatra, Devshayani Ekadashi, Guru Purnima, Chaturmas Vrat (June–July)

 • Nag Panchami, Kamika Ekadashi, Tulsidas Jayanti, Putrada Ekadashi, Raksha Bandhan, Shravan Vrat (July–August) Nag Panchami, Kamika Ekadashi, Tulsidas Jayanti, Putrada Ekadashi, Raksha Bandhan, Shravan Vrat (July–August)

 • Kajari Teej (Teej), Bahula Chauth, Janmashtami, Radhashtami, Aja Ekadashi, Hartalika Teej (Teej), Ganesh Chaturthi, Rishi Panchami, Onam, Parivartini Ekadashi, Anant Chaturdashi (August–September) • Pitrpaksha, Indira Ekadashi, Fall Navaratri, Dussehra (Vijaya Dashami), Papankusha Ekadashi, Valmiki Jayanti (September–October)

 • Kartik Purnima (October–November) Karva Chauth, Rambha Ekadashi, Narak Chaturdashi, Diwali, Govardhan Puja (Annakut), Devotthayan Ekadashi, Tulsi Vivah, Govardhan Puja (Annakut), Devotthayan Ekadashi, Tulsi Vivah, Kartik Purnima

 • Bhairava Jayanti, Utpanna Ekadashi, Mokshada Ekadashi (November–December). 

 • Saphala Ekadashi, Putrada Ekadashi (December–January). 

Sakata Chauth, Shattila Ekadashi, Mauni Amavasya, Vasant Panchami, Bhishma Ashtami, Jaya Ekadashi, Ravidas Jayanti, Pongal, Magh Mela, Float Festival 

 • Magh (January–February) Sakata Chauth, Shattila Ekadashi, Mauni Amavasya, Vasant Panchami, Bhishma Ashtami, Jaya Ekadashi 

 • Janaki Navami, Vijaya Ekadashi, Shivaratri, Amalaki Ekadashi, Holi (February–March) The fact that the lunar year starts on the first day of the bright (waxing) half of the lunar month of Chaitra complicates the festival calendar even further. 


 

This presents an odd scenario since lunar months, at least in northern India, conclude on the full moon, making the declining moon's two weeks the first half of the lunar month. 

In Chaitra, the waning fortnight occurs at the end of the lunar year, followed by the waxing fortnight, which occurs in the first fortnight of the next year. 

As a result, Chaitra is both the beginning and final month of the lunar calendar. 



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Hinduism - The Hindu Calendar









The Hindu religious concept that various eras have distinct characteristics is one of the most basic Hindu religious beliefs. 



Some periods are believed to be more auspicious and favorable, while others are thought to be more inauspicious and hazardous. 

These judgements may be used to define the overall characteristics of certain periods or to identify the best time to do specific tasks. 

As a result, Hindus place a high value on time management and foreseeing auspicious events. 




Many contemporary Hindus utilize several calendars at the same time, but they may use them for distinct reasons. 



To begin, the Gregorian calendar of the common period is used for daily timekeeping, which may represent the impact of the British empire or, more simply, the effect of contemporary business and communications. 

It's worth noting that the only holidays observed on this calendar are national holidays like Independence Day, Gandhi Jayanti, and Republic Day, which are all set dates. 




There are a variety of different ways to measure time, some of which overlap with each other and others of which are only found in certain parts of the nation. 



  • The movement of the sun is used in many of these systems. 
  • The solar day, of course, is the most fundamental unit, which typically starts and finishes with the rising of the sun rather than the clock. 
  • There are seven solar days in a week. 
  • The year is divided in half by the sun's movement, with the uttarayana phase happening when the sun moves northward and the dakshinayana period occurring when the sun moves southward. 

In addition, there are two different variants of the solar year, each with twelve solar months. 

These months in northern India correlate to the twelve zodiac signs and record the passage of the sun through them. 




The Tamil solar year is an identical calendar found in southern India, in which the names of the months are derived from the names of specific nakshatras, or lunar zodiac signs. 



The lunar calendar is essential for religious life, while the solar calendar is generally utilized for astrological reasons. 

The Vikram era (fifty-six or fifty-seven years later than the common era) and the Shaka era (fifty-six or fifty-seven years later than the common era) are still used to date history using the lunar calendar (seventy-eight years earlier than the common era). 

Each lunar month has thirty days, making the lunar year twelve months long. 

A lunar day is somewhat shorter than a solar day since the moon's cycle is only approximately twenty-eight solar days long. 

The lunar month is split into two parts, each lasting fifteen days: the "dark" (krishna paksha) half, which occurs when the moon is waning and ends with the new moon, and the "bright" (shukla paksha), which occurs when the moon is waxing and concludes with the full moon. 




In northern India, the lunar month starts with the dark half of the moon and finishes with the full moon, while in the south, it is frequently the other way around. 



Because the solar year has about 365 days and the lunar year has approximately 354, each lunar year would begin eleven solar days sooner than the previous one if allowed unchecked. 

Every two and a half years, an intercalary month is added to rectify the difference. 

Although the celebration of a specific festival may vary by several weeks from one year to the next, this helps to maintain the lunar months falling around the same time every year. 

The lunar calendar is used to commemorate almost all Hindu festivals. 



The festivities of certain festivals are linked to specific lunar days, and therefore occur twenty-four times in a twelve-month lunar year: 


  • The god Vishnu is honored on the eleventh day (ekadashi) of each lunar month; 
  • the Goddess, especially in her form as Durga, is honored on the eighth day (ashtami); 
  • the god Shiva is honored on the thirteenth day (trayodashi) and the fourteenth day (chaturdashi); 
  • and the god Ganesh is honored on the fourth day (chaturthi). 




The lunar month, half of the moon, and specific lunar day are used to determine when yearly religious festivals are held. 



For example, Bhadrapada Krishna eight, the eighth day of the dark (waning) half of the lunar month of Bhadrapada, is dedicated to the deity Krishna. 

The lunar calendar is also used to commemorate the birthdays of many significant historical religious leaders, including Guru Nanak, the founder of the Sikh faith, the Buddha, and devotional poet-saints. 

Because of the overlapping calendars, any one day may be identified by multiple distinct markers: the day of the week and the day in the common period (as in many cultures), the day on the conventional solar calendar, and the day on the lunar calendar. 


Depending on the situation—business, astrology, or a festival—any of these may be chosen.