Showing posts with label Hindu Diaspora. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Hindu Diaspora. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is The Status Of The Caribbean Hindu Diaspora?


The West Indies are a group of Caribbean islands having a sizable Hindu diaspora community.

They were sent to the West Indies as indentured agricultural workers, primarily on sugar plantations, as in many other instances, but have now stayed there long enough to become part of the local population.

Hindus have built temples and erected holy places (tirthas) on several of the islands, notably Trinidad, to connect their religious life to their local surroundings.


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Hinduism - What Is The State Of The Hindu Diaspora In Fiji?


Fiji is one of the nations having a considerable Hindu diaspora. 

Indentured workers from India were initially introduced to Fiji in 1879 to work in the sugarcane plantations. 

Indians made up around 45 percent of Fiji's population in the 1990s. 

Despite their near-parity in population, Indians in Fiji have been constitutionally consigned to a minority position and are prohibited from owning property for the most part. 

In 1987, a military revolution deposed an Indian-dominated Parliament and reinstated a native Fijian as Prime Minister, revealing the divide between the Indian and Fijian communities. 

Many Indians continue to work as tenant farmers for Fijian landowners as a result of these limitations, but they also play an important role as retailers and professionals. 



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Hinduism - What Are The Populations From The Hindu Diaspora?




Although the great majority of Hindus reside in their traditional homeland of South Asia, mainly India and Nepal, Hindus have long settled in other countries. 

Hindu merchants had disseminated Indian influence across Southeast Asia by the fourth century C.E., as shown by the structures at the Angkor temple complex and the culture of Bali. 

Poverty and congestion in many regions of India (particularly Bihar) drove many of these merchants to work as agricultural contract workers in Fiji, South Africa, East Africa, the West Indies, Mauritius, and even Sri Lanka in the previous century. 

Despite the fact that their local status varies, all of these towns have significant Hindu populations. 

In some of these countries, Indians are treated equally to indigenous peoples, whereas in others, such as Fiji, they face legal challenges. 

Apart from agricultural work, serving in the British army or civil service in other regions of the British Empire, such as Singapore or Hong Kong, provided another opportunity for mobility and promotion. 

Finally, following the conclusion of World War II, immigration and nationalization regulations have been liberalized, resulting in the formation of a sizable Hindu community in North America, both in Canada and the United States.



You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.