Showing posts with label Hindu Festival Calendar. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Hindu Festival Calendar. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is Vijaya Dashami?

 

Vijaya Dashami is a Hindu festival commemorating the Lord's Victory Or Vijaya.("tenth victory")

Vijayadashami marks the culmination of Durga Puja in India's southern, eastern, northeastern, and some northern areas, commemorating goddess Durga's triumph over the buffalo monster Mahishasura to restore and defend dharma.

Lord Rama, Lord Vishnu's eighth avatar, is said to have vanquished the ten-headed monster Ravana in this famed Hindu festival. 

Lord Rama traveled to Ravana's realm with his brother Larkshman and devotee Hanuman to battle him and bring back Sita, Rama's wife.

 The holiday of Dussehra, which occurs on the tenth day of the lunar month, is known by another name.

According to Hindu mythology, Dussehra is celebrated after Navratri because Lord Ram is said to have worshipped Goddess Durga before embarking on his quest to slay Ravana, as advised by Lord Vishnu. 

The event commemorates Lord Ram's triumph over Lankan ruler Ravana (the 10-headed demon).

The festival has two mythological charters, one with the god Rama and the other with the Goddess, and both myths lead to this day as the day when the deity achieves ultimate triumph.


~Kiran Atma


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Hinduism - What Is The Hindu Festival Calendar?

 

Because just a few Hindu holidays are observed by all Hindus, maintaining an unified festival calendar is difficult. 

The same opposing forces that drive Hindu life also influence festival celebrations. 


  • On the one hand, there are substantial geographical disparities in festival celebrations, and on the other hand, there are huge sectarian distinctions. 
  • Some sectarian holidays are observed only in specific localities, while others are observed across the country. 
  • While most people are aware of most festivals because they are public holidays or are recorded on the calendar, significantly fewer individuals celebrate them as religious holidays. 
  • Finally, certain holidays are so important that they are observed by practically everyone, albeit some people will observe them with significantly more vigor. 
  • Although the Goddess festival known as Navaratri in the autumn is observed throughout the nation, it is observed with special zeal in Bengal, where the religion of the Mother Goddess is greatly revered. 


With these factors in mind, the lunar year's festival calendar is shown below, with the holidays listed in chronological sequence throughout the lunar months. 



The goal of this item is just to set out the calendar of these festivals throughout the year; separate entries for the lunar months and each festival provide more information. 



• Spring Navaratri, Ram Navami, Kamada Ekadashi, Hanuman Jayanti, Chittirai. 

• Chaitra (March–April) Papamochani Ekadashi, Spring Navaratri, Ram Navami, Kamada Ekadashi, Hanuman Jayanti, Chittirai. 

• Shitalashtami, Baruthani Ekadashi, Akshaya Trtiya, Parashuram Jayanti, Narsingh Jayanti, Baisakhi, Mohini Ekadashi, Buddha Purnima (April–May) Shitalashtami, Baruthani Ekadashi, Akshaya Trtiya, Parashuram Jayanti, Narsingh Jayanti, Baisakhi, Mohini Ekad

 • Achala Ekadashi, Savitri Puja, Ganga Dashahara, Nirjala Ekadashi (May–June) 

 • Yogini Ekadashi, Rath Yatra, Devshayani Ekadashi, Guru Purnima, Chaturmas Vrat (June–July)

 • Nag Panchami, Kamika Ekadashi, Tulsidas Jayanti, Putrada Ekadashi, Raksha Bandhan, Shravan Vrat (July–August) Nag Panchami, Kamika Ekadashi, Tulsidas Jayanti, Putrada Ekadashi, Raksha Bandhan, Shravan Vrat (July–August)

 • Kajari Teej (Teej), Bahula Chauth, Janmashtami, Radhashtami, Aja Ekadashi, Hartalika Teej (Teej), Ganesh Chaturthi, Rishi Panchami, Onam, Parivartini Ekadashi, Anant Chaturdashi (August–September) • Pitrpaksha, Indira Ekadashi, Fall Navaratri, Dussehra (Vijaya Dashami), Papankusha Ekadashi, Valmiki Jayanti (September–October)

 • Kartik Purnima (October–November) Karva Chauth, Rambha Ekadashi, Narak Chaturdashi, Diwali, Govardhan Puja (Annakut), Devotthayan Ekadashi, Tulsi Vivah, Govardhan Puja (Annakut), Devotthayan Ekadashi, Tulsi Vivah, Kartik Purnima

 • Bhairava Jayanti, Utpanna Ekadashi, Mokshada Ekadashi (November–December). 

 • Saphala Ekadashi, Putrada Ekadashi (December–January). 

Sakata Chauth, Shattila Ekadashi, Mauni Amavasya, Vasant Panchami, Bhishma Ashtami, Jaya Ekadashi, Ravidas Jayanti, Pongal, Magh Mela, Float Festival 

 • Magh (January–February) Sakata Chauth, Shattila Ekadashi, Mauni Amavasya, Vasant Panchami, Bhishma Ashtami, Jaya Ekadashi 

 • Janaki Navami, Vijaya Ekadashi, Shivaratri, Amalaki Ekadashi, Holi (February–March) The fact that the lunar year starts on the first day of the bright (waxing) half of the lunar month of Chaitra complicates the festival calendar even further. 


 

This presents an odd scenario since lunar months, at least in northern India, conclude on the full moon, making the declining moon's two weeks the first half of the lunar month. 

In Chaitra, the waning fortnight occurs at the end of the lunar year, followed by the waxing fortnight, which occurs in the first fortnight of the next year. 

As a result, Chaitra is both the beginning and final month of the lunar calendar. 



You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.