Showing posts with label Hiranyakashipu. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Hiranyakashipu. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Is Vijaya In Hindu Mythology?



In Hindu mythology, Vijaya is one of Vaikuntha's gate guards, who, along with his brother Jaya, is cursed by the sage Sanaka to be born three times as an asura (demon) and destroyed by Vishnu each time.




Jaya and Vijaya incarnate as Hiranyaksha and Hiranyakashipu in their first births, respectively, and are murdered by the Boar avatar and the Man-Lion avatar.








They have a second Earthly incarnation, Ravana, and Kumbhakarna, who are murdered by Lord Vishnu incarnate as Rama.



Next, they take on the forms of Shishupala and Dantavaktra, who are murdered by Lord Krishna, this being their last birth for now.



They resume their responsibilities as Vishnu's guardians after their last slaying at the Lord's hands. It is believed they are yet to fully atone and extinguish the energy of the sage's curse. As a result, they will take birth yet again, only to suffer and be slaughtered by Lord Kalki for the final time. 


~Kiran Atma


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Hinduism - What Is The Man-Lion Or Nara-Simha Avatar Of Lord Vishnu?

 


Avatar of the Man-Lion. - The deity Vishnu's fourth avatar or incarnation; the man-form lion's is commonly shown as a lion's head and shoulders with a man's torso and legs.

The Man Lion avatar, like all of Vishnu's avatars, arrives to restore cosmic balance that has been thrown out of whack by some individual's inordinate strength.

The cause of problems in this situation is the demon-king Hiranyakashipu, who gets three boons from the gods thanks to his asceticism (tapas): he cannot be destroyed by man or beast, by day or night, inside or outside.

These boons make Hiranyakashipu almost invulnerable, and he goes on to conquer the world and expel the gods from heaven.

He oppresses his son Prahlada, who stays a true devotee (bhakta) of Vishnu despite his father's dominance.

The more devotion Prahlada exhibits to Vishnu, the more abuse he receives from his father, until Hiranyakashipu becomes enraged at the prospect of someone refusing to worship him and kills Prahlada.

Prahlada appeals to Vishnu for assistance, and the Man-Lion emerges from a pillar in the palace, neither man nor beast.

The Man-Lion captures Hiranyakashipu at the palace entryway, which is neither inside nor outside, and uses his keen claws to rip out the demon's innards, killing him.

Vishnu appoints the saintly Prahlada as monarch of the kingdom after Hiranyakashipu is murdered.

This behavior illustrates a crucial fact about Hindu reality perception.

Despite the fact that Prahlada is a "devil" (asura), he is neither intrinsically malevolent or a creature to be eradicated.

In the Hindu world, all sorts of entities have their due place; the difficulty arises when they acquire excessive power and utilize it for their own objectives.


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Hinduism - Who Is Jaya?

 


Vaikuntha, one of the gatekeepers of the deity Vishnu's celestial home, is cursed, along with his brother Vijaya, to be born three times as a demon (asura) and destroyed by Vishnu each time.

When they prevent Sanaka from seeing Vishnu, he bestows this curse on them.

The two are born as Hiranyaksha and Hiranyakashipu, who are slaughtered by the Boar avatar and the Man-Lion avatar, respectively, in their first incarnation.

Ravana and Kumbhakarna are their second incarnations, and both are destroyed by Vishnu's Rama avatar.

They reincarnate as Shisupala and Dantavaktra in their last incarnation and are murdered by Vishnu's Krishna avatar.

They return to their responsibilities as Vishnu's guardians after the curse's criteria have been met.

 


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Hinduism - Who Is Holika In Hindu Mythology?


In Hindu mythology, the demon-king Hiranyakashipu's evil sister.

Holika assists Hiranyakashipu in his attempt to assassinate his son Prahlada, who is a devout follower of the deity Vishnu (bhakta).

She can't be hurt by fire because of a heavenly ability.

Prahlada is tricked into sitting on her lap in a bonfire, expecting her to be unharmed while he dies.

Fortunately, Vishnu transfers Holika's power to Prahlada, and she is consumed by the fire while he remains unharmed.

The myth of Holika's burning serves as inspiration for the Holi festival's bonfires.

On a mythic level, the bonfire represents the triumph of good over evil; on a practical level, because the materials in the fire are supposed to be old and broken, the bonfire represents letting go of the previous year's baggage and beginning anew.


 

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Hinduism - What Is The Narrative And Moral Lesson In The Mythos Of Hiranyakashipu?


Hiranyakashipu is a demon king who is murdered by the deity Vishnu in his incarnation as a Man-Lion in Hindu mythology.

Hiranyakashipu develops a number of divine abilities as a consequence of his strict physical asceticism, rendering him almost invulnerable: one of these powers is that he cannot be slain by man or beast, at any time of day or night, inside or outside.

Hiranyakashipu, aided by these abilities, conquers the whole world before driving the gods from heaven, getting prouder and more repressive as his power grows.

He especially oppresses his son Prahlada, who, despite his father's authority, remains a devout Vishnu follower (bhakta).

Hiranyakashipu, enraged at the prospect of someone refusing to worship him, eventually offers Prahlada the choice of worshiping him or dying.

Prahlada asks Vishnu for assistance, and Vishnu comes as a Man-Lion, a man from the chest down with the head and shoulders of a lion, who is neither man nor beast.

At twilight, which is neither day nor night, the Man-Lion captures Hiranyakashipu at the palace entryway, which is neither inside nor out, and uses his keen claws to rip out the demon's innards, killing him.

The narrative of Hiranyakashipu is supposed to convey the dangers of pride, as well as the legendary fact that no power, no matter how great, can protect one from the repercussions of one's terrible conduct. 


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