Showing posts with label Jati. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Jati. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Are The Yadava?

 


The tribe from whom the deity Krishna is claimed to have sprung and over which he reigned after establishing his dominion in the city of Dwaraka, according to Hindu legend.

Between the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries in Indian history, the Yadava dynasty ruled the Deccan area in present Maharashtra.

This is the name of a specific jati in northern Indian culture, an endogamous social grouping organized (and whose social position dictated) by the group's hereditary vocation.

The Yadavas had a low social status in previous generations, but they have recently risen to prominence in politics—Mulayam Singh Yadav has twice been elected chief minister of Uttar Pradesh and has also served as India's defense minister; Laloo Prasad Yadav has served as chief minister of Bihar (either directly or indirectly through his wife) throughout the 1990s.


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Hinduism - What Are Marriage Prohibition In Hindu Marriages?

 

Marriage Prohibitions are a set of laws that prohibit people from marrying one other.

Hindus, like other cultures, have well-defined norms and regulations about who one should marry and who one should not marry—marriages should be endogamous, or between members of the same social grouping (in this case, the jati).

Within this broader group, it is widely recognized that the bride and groom should not be from the same gotra or pravara—mythic lineages describing old sage ties.

The marriage of people with whom one had a sapinda relationship—common ancestry—was also prohibited.

The Sapinda connection ends after the seventh generation on the father's side and the fifth generation on the mother's side, according to one well-known code of law, the Mitakshara.

A legitimate marriage may be formed between people who have shared ancestors outside those bounds.

This sapinda formula was often disregarded, especially in portions of southern India, where marrying one's maternal uncle's daughter was not only acceptable, but encouraged.

While some dharma books criticize the practice as an abomination, others point out that it is a tradition unique to the south, where it is only authorized as part of the family's usual practice (kulachara).

Cross cousin marriage has a long history in southern India, and it is still practiced today.

There is also opinion among southern Indian brahmins that their tiny population—roughly 4% of the total—made it hard to locate brahmin wives under the tight criteria.

This ritual was judged less significant due to the conflicting imperatives of marrying other brahmins and adhering to lineage constraints.

Mars is a planet connected with action, conflict, and misfortune in Hindu astrology (jyotisha).

Mars is seen as a powerful but evil planetary force as a result of these links.

The day of the week controlled by Mars, Tuesday, is considered an unlucky day, and people commonly undertake rituals of protection to shield themselves from Mars's negative influence.

From 1901 until 1931, Marshall, Sir John, was Director General of the Archeological Survey of India (ASI).

Marshall obtained his British knighthood for discovering and excavating the towns of the Indus Valley civilization during his stint as director.

He also continued the work of his ASI predecessors, especially Sir Alexander Cunningham, in recording and cataloging India's ancient treasures.


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Hinduism - Who Are The Kapu Or Kapus Among Jatis?


Traditional Indian society was based around a series of endogamous, or intermarried, groupings known as jatis ("birth").

The group's hereditary occupation, over which each group had a monopoly, was how these jatis were structured (and how their social rank was decided).

The Kapus were farmers in traditional civilization.

The Kapus are the largest landholding tribe in most of contemporary Andhra Pradesh, notably in the area bordering modern Tamil Nadu.


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Hinduism - What Is Jati In A Hindu Society?

 

 (“birth”) In Indian culture, a traditional social grouping.

There were hundreds of these groupings, which were deemed exogamous because there were stringent taboos against marrying outside one's jati—people from various jatis were seen as separate "species" of humans.

The traditional occupation of the Jatis, which they and they alone had the right to practice, was frequently used to designate the subgroup.

The jatis were ordered in society in hierarchical order based on the perceived purity or impurity (ashaucha) of their jobs, and this hierarchy provided the foundation for the caste system, a traditional Hindu social structure.

 


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Hinduism - Who Are The Jats Of Northern India?


 One of the hundreds of subgroups of traditional Indian society known as jatis ("birth").

Each jati was linked with — and had a monopoly over — a certain profession, and the social standing of the jati's members was defined by that employment; this structure gave rise to the present caste system.

The Jats are a northern Indian ethnic group whose members live in a number of northern Indian states, including Haryana, Punjab, Uttar Pradesh, and Rajasthan.

The Jats are equally divided between Hindus and Sikhs in Punjab, although the population is mostly Hindu in other locations.

Farming is the Jats' ancestral employment, and they are generally regarded as strong and tenacious peasants; these qualities have also made them outstanding soldiers, both in the service of the British Empire and in independent India.

For a variety of religious and symbolic reasons, ascetics often wear their hair in jatas.

Uncut hair is a sign of renunciation on one level; its untidy, matted appearance shows the ascetic's separation from worldly preoccupation with order and decorum.

On another level, ascetics wear jatas to imitate the deity Shiva, the archetypal ascetic, who is invariably shown with matted locks on his hair.

Although Shiva worshipers (bhakta) are the most prevalent wearers of jatas, certain rigorous renunciants who are devotees of the deity Vishnu also love this hairdo.

Finally, jatas are just a low-maintenance haircut from a non-religious standpoint.

They're generally rubbed with wood ash to keep them tidy; when the hair gets longer, the jatas simply become longer, and in many instances, they may be twisted into a crown, or jatamakuta, on top of the head.



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Hinduism - What Is The Prevalence Of Endogamy In Hindu Societies?


In anthropology, a marriage pattern in which members of a certain social group marry exclusively other members of that group. 

Traditional marriages in northern India are endogamous when it comes to the jati (hereditary occupational group) and exogamous when it comes to the village community and the gotra (mythic family lineage). 



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Hinduism - What Is The Ancestral Vocation Of Doms Jati?



Traditional Indian society was built around a collection of endogamous groupings called jatis ("birth"). 

The group's hereditary occupation, over which each group has a monopoly, was used to organize (and determine their social status) these jatis. 

The Doms are a jati whose hereditary occupation was cremating corpses in traditional northern Indian society. 

They have a low social status due to their frequent contact with dead bodies, which are considered the most violently impure of all objects. 

Despite their low rank, some Doms are quite rich, notably those who oversee the cremation ghats in Benares, since a corpse cannot be burnt without their participation. Any flat region on a river's bank is referred to as a ghat. 



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Hinduism - What Is The Deshastha Brahmin Jati?


Traditional Indian society was built around a collection of endogamous subgroups called jatis ("birth"). 

The group's hereditary occupation, over which each group held a monopoly, was how these jatis were structured (and how their social rank was decided). 

Even brahmins, whose function has been to serve as priests, scholars, and instructors, were differentiated in this way. 

The Deshastha brahmin jati is a subdivision of the Maharashtri brahmins, who were one of the five brahmin groups in the south (Pancha Dravida). 

The Deshastha brahmins' primary location is Maharashtra's Deccan region, while the other major subcommunity, the Chitpavan or Konkanastha, lives on the coast. 



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