Showing posts with label Jyotisha. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Jyotisha. Show all posts

Hinduism - How Does The Zodiac In Hindu Astrology Compare With Western Astrology?

 


The signs of the zodiac in Indian astrology (jyotisha) are almost similar to those in Western astrology, and it is widely assumed that the Greek zodiac was carried to India through Greek kingdoms in modern Afghanistan in the first to third centuries.

The Indian zodiac uses Dhanus ("bow") instead of Sagittarius, Makara (a sea monster that is commonly mistaken for a crocodile) instead of Capricorn, and Kumbha ("[water] pot") instead of Aquarius.

Each of the twelve signs, like Western astrology, has its own set of qualities that those born under them are infused with.

Although both begin with the sign of Aries, the two systems vary significantly in how they calculate the yearly beginning point.

The Western astrological zodiac starts on the spring equinox, with the sign of Aries being the first sign.

According to Indian legend, the zodiac begins when the sun touches the midway of a group of stars known as Ashvini.

It is therefore based on the sun's position in relation to the fixed stars, while the Western zodiac is based on the sun's position in relation to the earth—that is, when it meets the equator—and hence is independent of the fixed stars.

These disparities have resulted in a discrepancy between the two systems, which is now more than three weeks apart—Aries begins on March 21 in the Western zodiac, but not until around April 14 in the Indian zodiac.

This inconsistency may also be found in the accounts of Makara Sankranti and Karka Sankranti, which are considered the winter and summer solstices yet fall in the second weeks of January and July, respectively.

Given the three-week time gap, it's not surprising that the astrological calculations between these two systems diverge significantly.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.




Hinduism - What Is A Yantra? What Does Yantra Mean?

 

 

Yantra is a Sanskrit word that means "circle of life" or (“instrument”).

The term yantra most usually refers to a symbolic design, generally thought to impart magic or spiritual power on those who know how to employ it in astrology (jyotisha) and tantra, a secret, ritually based religious practice.

In other circumstances, such yantras are seen to represent an aniconic form of a deity, like in the example of the Shriyantra or Shrichakra, which is employed in rituals to worship the goddess Tripura Sundari.

In an astrological context, the yantras of the different planets are utilized in rituals to modify their effects, mainly to control or lessen the power of planets thought to be malefic or inauspicious.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.




Hinduism - What Is Vyakarana Or Vyaka Vedangas?

 


Vyaka (“analysis”) Vedangas is one of the six Vedangas.

The Vedangas were auxiliary fields of knowledge related with the Vedas, the earliest Hindu sacred books, and all of the Vedangas were linked to the Vedas' usage.

Vyakarana is, at its core, the study of Sanskrit grammar, which was plainly necessary for reading the Vedic writings.

Grammar is the queen of the ancient learned disciplines, and it is what is understood by the word vidya ("knowledge") in many situations, thanks to Vyakarana's status as the gatekeeper of the Sanskrit language.

Other Vedangas include shiksha (proper pronunciation), chandas (Sanskrit prosody), kalpa (ritual instructions), nirukta (etymology), and jyotisha (astrology).


Kiran Atma


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.




Hinduism - What Are The Attributes Of Venus Or Shukra Hindu Astrology?

 



Venus Or Shukra is a planet connected with love and pleasure in Hindu astrology (jyotisha).

It is regarded as a powerful planet with obvious beneficent tendencies, yet, like with all other planets, its abilities change depending on the circumstances.

Friday is presided over by Venus, whose good qualities make it a lucky day.


~Kiran Atma


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.




Hinduism - What Are The Vedanga?

 


("A Vedic [subsidiary] member") Six types of writings considered supplementary to the Vedas since they were created to make their usage easier.

These six were shiksha (correct articulation and pronunciation), metrical forms (chandas), Sanskrit grammar (vyakarana), etymological explanations of archaic terms (nirukta), establishing astrologically acceptable sacrificial periods (jyotisha), and ritual and ceremonial guidelines (kalpa).


~Kiran Atma


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.




Hinduism - What Is Sunday Called In Sanskrit? How Are Sundays Perceived In Hindu Astrology Or Jyotisha?

 

 (Ravivar) The first day of the Hindu week, with the sun as its ruling planet (and god) (ravi).

Sunday is considered generally auspicious but not exceptionally strong as a day, owing to the fact that although the sun is recognized as a god, it is not usually worshiped as a principal deity.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - What Are The Attributes Of The Sun In Hindu Astrology Or Jyotisha?

 

A planet linked with strength and vigor in Hindu astrology (jyotisha), however it may also be evil, probably representing the unrelenting destructive force of the Indian sun.

The sun's energy makes it a powerful planet, and the sun's location in the zodiac, as in Western astrology, plays an important part in determining a person's natal horoscope (janampatrika).

Sunday is ruled by the sun, a day of the week that isn't particularly auspicious or inauspicious.



You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.


 

Hinduism - Who Is Rahu In The Hindu Pantheon, Astrology, And Mythology?

 

In Hindu astrology (jyotisha), a wicked "planet" that has no analogue in Western astrology and was formerly the head of a demon.

According to legend, when the gods are drinking the nectar of immortality that they had churned from the ocean of milk, the demon Sainhikeya disguises himself and enters their midst.

The sun and moon alert Vishnu, who uses his discus to chop off the demon's head as the monster starts to drink.

However, after coming into touch with the nectar, Sainhikeya's two parts become eternal.

Rahu is born from the severed head, while Ketu is born from the beheaded body.

Rahu is the ascending node of the moon, rather than an actual planet.

This is the point in the sky when the moon's northward route crosses with the sun's path, resulting in an eclipse.

Rahu has a special dislike for the sun and moon, whom he blames for his death, and wants to devour them anytime he sees them in the sky.

He always succeeds, but they escape unhurt through Rahu's severed neck since he no longer has a body to digest them.

The traditional reason for solar and lunar eclipses is that they are associated with the wicked Rahu, which has led to eclipses being regarded as particularly unfavorable events.

Also see Tortoise avatar.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - What Is Nirukta In Hindu Philosophy?


 (“explanation”) These were the ancillary disciplines of knowledge related to the Vedas, the earliest Hindu holy writings.

Nirukta is interested in the origins of archaic terms and their etymological interpretations.

This seemed to be a severe issue, since about a fourth of the Vedic terms appear just once, and their pre cise meanings became either obscure or unknown over time.

Yaska the grammarian wrote the most renowned nirukta manuscript, known simply as the Nirukta, in the fifth century B.C.E.

His work was very useful to subsequent readers, but it is apparent that the meanings of many of these phrases had grown dubious and ambiguous even in Yaska's day.

Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar), chandas (Sanskrit prosody), kalpa (ritual instructions), shiksha (correct pronunciation), and jyotisha are the other Vedangas (auspicious times for sacrifices).


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - What Is A Hindu Natal Horoscope?

 

In Indian tradition, a person's natal horoscope, also known as janampatrika ("birth-paper"), is thought to disclose a lot about them.

The moment one is born is said to be determined by one's prior karma.

As a result, a natal horoscope serves as a karmic "itinerary," detailing where one has gone and what one might anticipate in the future.

Natal horoscopes continue to have a role in decision-making, particularly when it comes to marital arrangements.

Before committing to an engagement, the couple's compatibility is determined by exchanging natal horoscopes.

This occurs sometimes simply because the notion that the horoscopes are incompatible might be used as an excuse to reject an improper or unsatisfactory match.

Natal horoscopes are said to give vital information about a person's destiny.

If a person's horoscope predicts early death—or the early death of a spouse—marriage may be problematic unless specific rituals are performed to alleviate these issues.

~Kiran Atma


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.

Hinduism - What Are The Astrological Influences OF Monday Or Moon-Day Or Somavar In Jyotisha?


(Somavar) The second day of the Hindu week, with the moon as the ruling planet.

Coolness, healing power, and the Vedic god Soma are all connected with the moon.

Somnath, the Lord of the Moon, is a manifestation of the Hindu deity Shiva.

Monday is regarded as one of the week's most powerful and fortunate days.

Worship on particular Mondays, such as a Somavati Amavasya (a new moon occurring on a Monday) and Mondays in Shravan, is said to provide even higher religious blessings (a lunar month specially dedicated to Shiva).

On sixteen consecutive Mondays, the Sixteen Mondays Vow (Solah Somvar Vrat) is performed.

The Solah Somvar Vrat, like other similar vows, requires reciting the vow's charter myth in a ceremonial setting, as well as devotion and a strict diet.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - What Are The Indications Of The Moon In Jyotisha Or Hindu Astrology?


 A planet connected with fecundity (fertility) in Hindu astrology (jyotisha), albeit its aspect may be either beneficent or malicious—benevolent with the waxing moon, and malevolent with the declining moon.

The full moon is regarded the most fortunate moment of the lunar month.

The new moon, on the other hand, is seen as a ritually uncertain and hence potentially deadly moment.

During the week, the moon rules over Monday, which is widely seen as a lucky day and one that Shiva honors as Somnath, the Lord of the Moon.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - What Are Benefic And Malefic Effects Of Planet Mercury In Hindu Astrology?

 

Based on its brief orbit around the sun, a planet connected with mental speed, memory, and education in Hindu astrology (jyotisha).

Despite these usually beneficial characteristics, Mercury is seen as a weak planet, readily swayed by other planets or its location in the natal horoscope toward kindness or malevolence (janampatrika).

Mercury's connection to the mind shows that the mind's abilities may be used for good or evil.

Mercury is supposed to dominate Wednesday throughout the week; this day is neither particularly auspicious or inauspicious, reflecting the planet's light abilities.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - What Are The Indications Of Mercury In Hindu Astrology And Alchemy?

 


Mercury is a planet in the zodiac. 

In Indian alchemy, elemental mercury plays a crucial role.

The universe is seen in Hindu alchemy as a succession of bipolar opposites in conflict with one another.

The unification of these competing forces leads to spiritual advancement and the termination of reincarnation (samsara).

Hindu tantra, a hidden, ritual-based religious discipline, shares this paradigm of combining or transcending antagonistic energies.

Hatha yoga, which is centered on a sequence of physical exercises that are also said to alter the subtle body, has a similar idea.

The merger of the sun and the moon is the dominating metaphor for this clash of opposites.

The sun and the moon are linked to other opposing principles through a complex network of relationships.

Mercury is conceived as the semen of the god Shiva, and thus full of healing power, in accordance with this bipolar symbolism.

It's also associated with the moon (possibly due to its bright silvery hue), healing and restorative properties, and the nectar of immortality.

The goddess Shakti's uterine blood is associated with the element sulfur.

The aspirant's body is purified and refined when mercury and sulfur are mixed and consumed, eventually making it immortal.

Modern descriptions of this practice caution that it should only be done under the supervision of one's guru (spiritual teacher); otherwise, these combinations will be harmful, as mercury is a poison in and of itself.

Obscure Religious Cults, by Shashibhushan B. Dasgupta, was published in 1962, and The Alchemical Body, by David Gordon White, was published in 1996.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - What Is The Hindu Festival Of Makara Sankranti?

 

Makara Sankranti is the Hindu New Year.

A religious celebration that occurs on the day the sun enters the zodiac sign of Capricorn (sankranti) (makara).

This happens around December 20 according to Western astrology, but January 14 according to Indian astrology (jyotisha).

This is one of the rare times throughout the festival year when the solar calendar is used rather than the lunar calendar.

The sun is said to be starting its "northward trek" on Makara Sankranti (uttarayana).

This will last for six months, until Karka Sankranti, when the sun enters Cancer and starts its "southward journey" (dakshinayana).

Because the uttarayana is seen to be more fortunate than its counterpart, the day of its transition is considered especially auspicious.

Makara Sankranti is predominantly a bathing (snana) celebration, with large crowds flocking to rivers, particularly the Ganges, on that day.

The greatest bathing festival on the Ganges is held on Sagar Island (also known as Ganga Sagar) in West Bengal, where the Ganges empties into the sea in the Bay of Bengal.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.




Hinduism - Who Is Ketu In The Hindu Pantheon?


In Hindu astrology (jyotisha), a wicked "planet" that was once the body of a demon.

The gods and demons join forces to churn the ocean of milk in order to gain the nectar of immortality, according to legend.

The gods are successful in defrauding the demons of their part.

While the gods sip the nectar, the demon Sainhikeya disguises himself and enters their midst.

The sun and moon alert Vishnu, who uses his discus to chop off the demon's head as the monster starts to drink.

Since coming into touch with the nectar, Sainhikeya's two parts have become eternal.

The dismembered body transforms into Ketu, while the severed head transforms into Rahu, another terrible planet.

Ketu is not an actual planet, but rather the moon's descending node, or the point where it meets the ecliptic as it moves southward.

Ketu is also linked to comets and blazing meteors, both of which are seen to be bad omens.

Avatar of the Tortoise may be found here.

 


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - What Is Jyotisha?


The term jyotisha refers to astrology in its broadest sense.

The term is derived from jyotis ("light," and by extension, heavenly bodies), and it refers to the movement of celestial bodies, their many configurations, and the temporal divisions that result from them.

Jyotisha is one of the six Vedangas, or auxiliary fields of knowledge related to the ancient books known as the Vedas, and it is one of the oldest cultural concerns.

Jyotisha, as one of the Vedangas, was concerned with determining the best days and times to conduct Vedic sacrifices.

Many traditional Hindus, even in contemporary times, take astrology extremely seriously, based on the belief that one's prior karma causes one to be born at a certain period.

The alignment of the celestial bodies at the moment of birth, or one's natal horoscope, therefore gives a karmic "itinerary" indicating where one has gone and what one might anticipate in the future.

People often consult astrology when making major choices, notably when planning weddings—to establish the couple's compatibility, to see if any problem is on the horizon, and to schedule the event at an auspicious or fortunate period.

Similarly, some Hindus may contact an astrologer before embarking on any major project to ensure that it will begin at an auspicious time and so be more likely to succeed.

Indian astrology's fundamental concepts are remarkably similar to those of Western astrology.

The signs of the zodiac are substantially similar.

However, the two systems use different methods to determine the beginning point of each sign, resulting in some differences.

In Indian astrology, in addition to the sun, moon, and five visible planets, there are two more planets, Rahu and Ketu, which are both considered inauspicious and malicious.

In addition to the twelve signs of the solar zodiac, Indian astrology features a lunar zodiac with twenty-seven "lunar mansions" (nakshatras) each with its own set of characteristics.

Although astrological reckoning is quite straightforward at its most basic level, it may soon become extremely complicated, therefore it is usually left to experienced astrologers.

In most of India, this is still a viable career, since the widely held idea that some times are auspicious and others are unfavorable means that ordinary people would engage professionals to keep them informed about certain periods.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.