Showing posts with label Kamakhya. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Kamakhya. Show all posts

Hinduism - Where Is The Nilachal Hill In India?

 

Nilachal Hill is a sacred location (tirtha) overlooking the Brahmaputra River, some six miles outside Guwahati in the contemporary state of Assam.

Nilachal Hill is famous for its temple dedicated to the goddess Kamakhya, one of India's most powerful goddesses.

This is one of the Shakti Pithas, a network of Goddess-sanctuary places that stretches throughout the Indian subcontinent.

Each Shakti Pitha commemorates the location where a piece of the goddess Sati's severed body fell to earth and took on the shape of a new goddess.

Sati's vulva is reported to have fallen to earth at the Kamakhya temple; the goddess's image is a natural gap in the rock around which the temple has been erected.

Kamakhya is particularly powerful since it comes from the most sexually stimulated portion of the female anatomy.


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Hinduism - What Is The Kalimath?

 

Kalimath - (“Kali's Residence”) In Uttar Pradesh's Himalayan mountains, there is a village and a holy spot (tirtha).

Kalimath lies roughly ten kilometers from Guptakashi on a minor tributary of the Mandakini River; the Mandakini is one of the Himalayan tributaries that merge to form the Ganges.

Kalimath is one of the Shakti Pithas, a network of holy locations dedicated to the Goddess, according to local legend.

Each Shakti Pitha commemorates the location where a piece of the goddess Sati's severed body fell to earth and took on the shape of a new goddess.

According to local legend, Kalimath is the location where Sati's vulva landed.

It assumed the shape of the goddess Kali there, thereby linking a highly charged female bodily part with a strong and sometimes deadly Goddess form.

The Goddess image at the temple is a metal plate a little more than a foot square with a little triangle carved out in the middle, an aniconic emblem of the Goddess.

This plate is said to cover a pit—a clear sign of the portion of Sati's corpse that is said to have fallen there—but the region underneath it is considered so holy that peering beneath it is banned.

The notion that Kalimath is where Sati's vulva descended to ground exemplifies the Indian holy landscape's flexibility.

A far more commonly acknowledged tradition connects this specific body part to the Kamakhya temple in Assam.

Competing claims are widespread in the Indian holy landscape, since individuals typically create them to increase the holiness and status of their particular spot.

Many Hindus seem unconcerned by such apparent inconsistencies, presumably because they believe that a single Goddess is responsible for all of her many manifestations.




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Hinduism - Who Is Kamakhya? What Does Kamakhya Mean? Where Is The Kamakhya Temple?


 ("desiring eyes") is a phrase used to describe someone who is looking for something A specific manifestation of the Mother Goddess, whose temple atop Nilachal Hill, just outside Guwahati, Assam, overlooks the Brahmaputra River.

This temple is part of the Shakti Pithas, a network of holy places that stretches throughout the Indian subcontinent.

Each Shakti Pitha commemorates the location where a piece of the goddess Sati's severed body fell to earth and took on the shape of a new goddess.

The Kamakhya temple is where Sati's vulva hit the ground.

The goddess's figure is carved out of a natural gap in the rock, which the temple is erected around.

Kamakhya is thought to be immensely strong since she sprang from the most sexually charged region of the female anatomy.

Like many great goddesses, her production potential must be constantly replenished by accepting sacrifices, particularly the blood of living creatures.

In current times, the most common sacrifice is a goat, however human sacrifices have been reported in the past.

When her current temple was established in 1565, Kamakhya was reputedly promised 140 men.

This practice persisted until 1832, when the British put an end to it.

The men who were given as human sacrifices were said to be volunteers who thought they had been summoned by her.

They were revered as virtual divinities between proclaiming their desire to be sacrificed and their deaths since they were thought to have been devoted to the goddess.

More information may be found in George Weston Briggs' Gorakhnath and the Kanphata Yogis, published in 1973. 


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Hinduism - How Prevalent Was Human Sacrifice In Hinduism? What Are The Instances Of Human Sacrifice In Hindu Mythology?


Human Sacrifice is a term used to describe the ritual act of sacrificing a human being.

Human sacrifice was not common in Hindu religious life in the past, but it was not unknown.

One of the common mythic motifs in the worship of certain fierce and powerful deities is for devotees (bhakta) to offer their own heads to the Goddess as the ultimate sacrifice and act of devotion, but experts aren't sure how often this was done.

The demon king Ravana, for example, is said to have cut off nine of his ten heads before the god Shiva granted him divine power.

The Bengali saint Ramakrishna is also credited with the determination to carry out this act, though the goddess Kali intervened before he could do so.

The temple of the goddess Kamakhya in Assam was the one place where human sacrifice was unquestionably a regular practice.

This temple is part of the Shakti Pithas, a network of Goddess-sanctuary sites that stretches across the Indian subcontinent.

Each Shakti Pitha commemorates the location where a piece of the dismembered goddess Sati fell to earth and took on the form of a new goddess.

The body part in this case was Sati's vulva, and Kamakhya became a very powerful goddess due to the presence of such a highly charged part of the female body.

She was reportedly offered the heads of 140 men when the new temple was dedicated in 1565, and this practice continued until the British put an end to it in 1832.

The men who were offered as human sacrifices were said to be volunteers who believed they had been summoned by the goddess to do so; in the time between announcing their intention to be sacrificed and their deaths, they were treated as virtual divinities, having been consecrated to the goddess.

For more information, see E. A. Gait's 1963 book, A History of Assam.

 


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