Showing posts with label Kamakhya Temple. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Kamakhya Temple. Show all posts

Hinduism - Where Is The Nilachal Hill In India?

 

Nilachal Hill is a sacred location (tirtha) overlooking the Brahmaputra River, some six miles outside Guwahati in the contemporary state of Assam.

Nilachal Hill is famous for its temple dedicated to the goddess Kamakhya, one of India's most powerful goddesses.

This is one of the Shakti Pithas, a network of Goddess-sanctuary places that stretches throughout the Indian subcontinent.

Each Shakti Pitha commemorates the location where a piece of the goddess Sati's severed body fell to earth and took on the shape of a new goddess.

Sati's vulva is reported to have fallen to earth at the Kamakhya temple; the goddess's image is a natural gap in the rock around which the temple has been erected.

Kamakhya is particularly powerful since it comes from the most sexually stimulated portion of the female anatomy.


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Hinduism - Who Is Kamakhya? What Does Kamakhya Mean? Where Is The Kamakhya Temple?


 ("desiring eyes") is a phrase used to describe someone who is looking for something A specific manifestation of the Mother Goddess, whose temple atop Nilachal Hill, just outside Guwahati, Assam, overlooks the Brahmaputra River.

This temple is part of the Shakti Pithas, a network of holy places that stretches throughout the Indian subcontinent.

Each Shakti Pitha commemorates the location where a piece of the goddess Sati's severed body fell to earth and took on the shape of a new goddess.

The Kamakhya temple is where Sati's vulva hit the ground.

The goddess's figure is carved out of a natural gap in the rock, which the temple is erected around.

Kamakhya is thought to be immensely strong since she sprang from the most sexually charged region of the female anatomy.

Like many great goddesses, her production potential must be constantly replenished by accepting sacrifices, particularly the blood of living creatures.

In current times, the most common sacrifice is a goat, however human sacrifices have been reported in the past.

When her current temple was established in 1565, Kamakhya was reputedly promised 140 men.

This practice persisted until 1832, when the British put an end to it.

The men who were given as human sacrifices were said to be volunteers who thought they had been summoned by her.

They were revered as virtual divinities between proclaiming their desire to be sacrificed and their deaths since they were thought to have been devoted to the goddess.

More information may be found in George Weston Briggs' Gorakhnath and the Kanphata Yogis, published in 1973. 


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.