Showing posts with label Kauravas. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Kauravas. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Are The Kauravas In Hindu Mythology?


The Kauravas are the hundred sons of King Dhrtarashtra in the Mahabharata, the later of the two major Hindu epics, and the epic's enemies to the Pandava heroes.

As descendants of Kuru, King Shantanu's ancestor, the Kauravas get their name.

The Kaurava boys are born in an unconventional way, as is common in Hindu mythology.

Gandhari, their mother, obtains the sage Vyasa's benediction (ashirvad) that she would have one hundred boys.

Her pregnancy is more than two years long.

She gives birth to a large lump of meat when she becomes impatient and attempts to accelerate the delivery.

Gandhari should split the lump and set each piece in a saucepan of clarified butter, according to Vyasa (ghee).

Each of the 101 pots eventually breaks open, revealing a hundred lovely lads and a solitary girl, Dussala.

The two oldest sons, Duryodhana and Duhshasana, are the most significant of the hundred sons. 


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Hinduism - Who Is Jayadratha?


Jayadratha was a monarch who is married to the princess Dussala in the Mahabharata, the second of the two major Hindu epics.

Dussala is the sole sister of the Kauravas, the epic's villains, a group of one hundred brothers.

Jayadratha previously coveted the hand of Draupadi, but after losing her to the warrior Arjuna, he spends the rest of his life fighting Arjuna and his brothers, the Pandavas.

Jayadratha joins the side of the Kauravas during the Mahabharata conflict between the Pandavas and the Kauravas, and is finally murdered by Arjuna.

A heavenly voice foretold during Jayadratha's birth that whomever causes Jayadratha's head to fall to earth will have his head split into a hundred pieces.

Arjuna, a peerless archer, is aware of this and chops off Jayadratha's head with an arrow that rests in the lap of Jayadratha's father, Brhatkaya.

Brhatkaya is frightened to the point that he lets the head fall from his lap to the ground, shattering into a hundred pieces.

 


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Hinduism - Where Is The Ancient City Of Indraprastha?

 

Indraprastha was the name given to the first of the towns erected on the current location of contemporary Delhi, on the banks of the Yamuna River in the southeastern section of the city.

Indraprastha is known as the capital of the Pandavas, the five brothers who are the protagonists of the Mahabharata, the later of the two major Hindu epics.

The city is established when their uncle, King Dhrtarashtra, divides his realm between the Pandavas and his own sons, the Kauravas, according to the epic.

Despite the fact that the epic contains several descriptions of Indraprastha, there is little evidence of a direct link between the archeological site and the events depicted in the epic.



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Hinduism - Where Is The Ancient City Of Hastinapur In India?

 

About sixty miles northeast of Delhi, there is an archeological site.

Pottery and other items from this site are thought to date from the ninth to sixth centuries B.C.E., making them contemporaneous with the latter portions of the Vedas, the oldest Hindu holy books.

Hastinapur is the capital of the Kauravas, a group of one hundred brothers who are the adversaries of the Mahabharata, the later of the two major Hindu epics.

Despite the fact that the site's name and the location mentioned in the epic are identical, nothing has been discovered to link the two.

 

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Hinduism - Who Was Duhshasana, And The Kauravas?


 Duhshasana is one of Dhrtarashtra's hundred sons, known collectively as the Kauravas, in the Mahabharata, the later of the two major Hindu epics. 

The fight for dominance between the Kauravas and their cousins, the Pandavas, is at the core of the Mahabharata, and the Pandavas are the epic's heroes. 

After the oldest Pandava, Yudhishthira, loses everything—including Draupadi—in a game of dice, Duhshasana becomes renowned for his disobedience against the Pandavas' common wife Draupadi. 

Duhshasana takes Draupadi into the gaming hall by her hair and her clothing, which are soiled by her monthly blood; he also tries to disrobe Draupadi by ripping off her sari, but is thwarted by the deity Krishna, who magically extends Draupadi's sari indefinitely. 

Duhshasana's actions in this incident only serve to exacerbate the animosity between the two families. 

Bhima, Draupadi's husband and a Pandava brother known for his physical prowess, pledges to revenge the insult by tearing open Duhshasana's chest and consuming his blood, while Draupadi vows to keep her hair unbound until she may bathe it in Duhshasana's blood. 

During the Mahabharata battle, Duhshasana fights his brother Duryodhana and is finally murdered by Bhima, who thus fulfills both Bhima and Draupadi's awful promises. 

Before murdering Duhshasana, Bhima cuts off the hand that had been holding Draupadi's hair and beats Duhshasana with his own severed limb as an added measure of vengeance. 



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