Showing posts with label Kubera. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Kubera. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Are The Yaksha In The Hindu Pantheon?


(feminine yakshi) A group of minor deities who are mostly nature spirits and are typically linked with certain locations.

Yakshas are the attendants of the god Kubera, who is revered as the ruler of riches and the protector of the northern direction.

The yakshas are typically seen as good to humans, and because of their ties to nature's reproductive force and Kubera's riches, they are often regarded as giving prosperity and fertility.

Yakshas have a long history of appearing in Indian sectarian literature, where they are depicted as either protective spirits or depraved examples.

The sole comprehensive monograph on yakshas is Ananda Coomaraswamy's Yaksas, published in 1971.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - Who Is Ravana In Hindu Mythology?

 

Ravana is the ten-headed demon ruler of Lanka in the Ramayana, the first of the two major Indian epics.

Vishnu, in his incarnation as Rama, is born to vanquish Ravana.

Ravana is the reincarnation of Vishnu's guardian Jaya, who was cursed by a guru to be reincarnated three times as a demon, each time being destroyed by Vishnu.

Ravana is a rakshasa, a sort of demon with enormous physical strength and a variety of magical abilities.

In Indian culture, rigorous physical asceticism (tapas) is commonly thought to develop spiritual strength and bring boons from the gods, and he uses it to supplement these natural powers.

When the deity Brahma comes and instructs Ravana to pick his boon, Ravana demands that he be able to be slain only by humans.

This effectively makes him immortal, since his abilities are such that no average human will be able to injure, much alone kill him.

Ravana then proceeds to torment the gods, certain that they would be unable to stop him.

He starts with his half-brother Kubera, a lesser god who loses his house and all he has to Ravana.

Ravana's near-invulnerability gets the better of him, and the mighty demon starts to break all moral and ethical conventions.

He has a history of abusing and kidnapping women, which has resulted in a slew of curses from his defenseless victims, many of which prophesy his demise.

Rama's brother Lakshmana mutilates his sister Shurpanakha as a consequence of one of these curses.

Ravana is determined to revenge this insult, and he believes that abducting Rama's wife Sita is the best way to do it.

Ravana steadfastly refuses to listen to his wife Mandodari and brothers, who chastise him for his actions and implore him to return Sita and make peace with Rama.

His inflated pride and desire to revenge his sister's insult deafens him to their advice, and he pays the price for his obstinacy with his life when Rama kills him in combat.

Ravana, like other demons, isn't wholly evil by nature, but he is very strong and imperfect at the same time.

Ravana is said to be a devotee (bhakta) of the deity Shiva, and the Shivatandava Stotra, a hymn to the dancing Shiva, is sometimes credited to him.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.




Hinduism - What Is The Pushpak Viman In Hindu Mythology?

 


Pushpak Viman, ("Flower chariot") is the most renowned of the flying automobiles in Hindu mythology.

Vishvakarma, the celestial architect, designed the Pushpak Viman.

The term essentially describes an inanimate transport air/space craft that could navigate the Earthly and Celestial realms.

Sanjna, Vishvakarma's daughter, has married the Sun, but she is so dazzled by his radiance that she asks her father to dim his radiance so she may be with him.

Vishvakarma does this by removing part of the sun's rays, which are then fashioned into the Pushpak Viman and other divine weapons.

For a while, the minor god Kubera had possessed the Pushpak Viman, which he obtained as a reward for practicing extreme physical austerity (tapas).

It is eventually snatched from Kubera by the demon-king Ravana, who uses it to perpetrate many acts of oppression, culminating in the kidnapping of Rama's wife Sita.

Rama uses the Pushpak Viman to return to Ayodhya after killing Ravana, and then returns the automobile to Kubera.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.




Hinduism - What Is The Meghaduta?

 


 (“Cloud-Messenger”) One of Kalidasa's major literary works (5th century? ), often regarded as the finest classical Sanskrit poet.

The Meghaduta is a one-hundred-verse poem written completely in an exceptionally lengthy meter known as mandakranta, with each quarter stanza having seventeen syllables.

The poem relates the tale of a yaksha (nature sprite) who has been exiled to India's southernmost region.

The yaksha watches a monsoon rain cloud travelling northward in its yearly voyage, separated from his loving wife who is at their home in the Himalayan realm of Kubera.

He begs it to deliver a love message to his sweetheart.

The yaksha is a term used to describe the areas across which the cloud passes.

This depiction paints a detailed picture of Kalidasa's period, including daily life and cultural centers.

Meghasandesha, "The Message [borne by] a Cloud," is the name given to the poem by certain sources.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - Where Is Lanka In The Context Of Hindu Mythology?

 

Lanka is the land of the demon-king Ravana in the Ramayana, the first of the two major Indian epics.

Although the epic's descriptions should be regarded as mythological and narrative tales than than a geographical survey, Lanka is occasionally connected with the present island of Sri Lanka, and southern Indian places such as Rameshvaram have been linked to events in the Ramayana.

Vishvakarma, the heavenly architect, had created Lanka for Kubera, a lesser god, but Kubera had been deposed by Ravana and his siblings.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - Who Are Kimpurusha, Kinnara, Kindama, And Kubera?


Kimpurusha is another name for the fabled Kinnara creatures.

Kindama is a forest-dwelling sage in the Mahabharata, whose curse on King Pandu advances the epic's storyline.

Kindama, who is celibate in his human form, utilizes his magical abilities to convert himself and his wife into animals so that they might have sexual pleasure.

King Pandu kills Kindama and his wife with an arrow when they are in the shape of deer on one occasion.

The sage and his wife return to their human selves in their last moments.

The sage curses Pandu, who is terrified, to die the instant he embraces his bride in a passionate hug.

Pandu abdicates the kingdom in favor of his blind brother Dhrtarashtra and becomes a celibate renunciant since he is childless.

Kunti and Madri, Pandu's wives, finally have offspring by supernatural powers.

The epic's central conflict is the fight for dominance between their offspring and Duryodhana, Dhrtarashtra's son.

"What, Man?" says Kinnara.

Mythical beings depicted as having either a horse's head and a human's body, or a human's head and a horse's body.

The Kinnaras are regarded as Kubera's slaves, a minor god.

Kubera is one of the Guardians of the Directions, an eight-headed deity who is said to control the cardinal and intermediate directions.

He is the monarch of the northern hemisphere and is hence identified as a resident of the Himalayas, where the Kinnaras also reside.

The Kinnaras are sometimes mistaken for the Kimpurushas, a race of legendary animals. 


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - Who Is Kubera Or Kuber In The Hindu Panthen?


In Hindu mythology, a minor god who guards the northern quarter as one of the eight Guardians of the Directions.

Kubera is thought to reside in the Himalayan highlands, surrounded by legendary animals including yakshas, nagas, and kinnaras that serve him.

He is tremendously obese, and he is immensely rich, thanks to the mineral wealth stored in the mountains.

Kubera is the half-brother of Ravana, Lanka's demon king, as well as Kumbhakarna and Vibhishana.

Kubera had a different mother than the other three sons of the deity Vishravas.

Ravana snatches Kubera's aerial chariot, the Pushpak Viman, despite their relationship.

As a result of Ravana's infamous actions, Kubera backs Rama's attempts to defeat Ravana. 


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.