Showing posts with label Lakshmana. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Lakshmana. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Is Sumati And Sumitra In Hindu Mythology?

 

One of King Sagar's wives in Hindu legend.

Sumati and her co-wife Keshini are given a choice in the number of children they will have: one will bear a single son through whom the lineage will continue, while the other will bear sixty thousand boys who will all die before they have any progeny, according to a sage's blessing.

Sumati selects the latter, and when her sixty thousand lovely sons go out to find their father's sacrifice horse, they are consumed by the sage Kapila's wrath.

Despite the fact that these boys die without trouble, they have a significant impact on the planet because Keshini's descendants bring the Ganges to earth to provide peace to their spirits.

Sumitra is one of King Dasharatha's three wives and the mother of Rama's half-brothers, the twins Lakshmana and Shatrughna, in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics.

Her sons are essential characters in the epic because of their dedication and service to Rama, while Sumitra is only relevant because she bears them.


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Hinduism - Who IS Rishyashringa In Hindu Mythology?

 


Rishyashringa  is a sage from the Ramayana, the first of India's two major epics.

Rishyashringa is tasked by King Dasharatha to make a significant sacrifice in order for the king's women to conceive.

A radiant figure comes from the sacrificial fire at the conclusion of Rishyashringa's sacrifice, lays a pot of milk-rice in front of Dasharatha, and tells him to give it to his wives.

Dasharatha distributes the contents amongst his three wives, Kausalya, Kaikeyi, and Sumitra, and they all have sons in due time.

Kausalya is Rama's daughter and the protagonist of the Ramayana.

Bharata's mother is Kaikeyi, while Lakshmana and Shatrughna's mother is Sumitra.


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Hinduism - Who Is Lakshmana In Hindu Mythology?


Lakshmana is one of King Dasharatha's sons with his wife Sumitra, and the younger half-brother of Rama, the epic's protagonist, in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics.

Lakshmana is the ideal younger brother throughout the Ramayana, living only to serve and assist Rama.

When Rama is exiled to the forest for fourteen years, Lakshmana follows him like a shadow the whole time, first as a forest ascetic, looking for Rama's stolen wife Sita, then fighting heroically in the battle with Ravana's army, and ultimately returning to serve Rama at his court in Ayodhya.

Many of the Ramayana's characters are archetypes for Indian cultural beliefs.

As with his brother Bharata, Lakshmana represents the perfect younger brother.

Brothers are the center of the joint family in northern India.

Sisters, on the other hand, stay at home after marriage and live with their married families.

Every generation's oldest brother ultimately ascends to the position of joint family leader.

The oldest brother, who has main authority and responsibility for the whole family, cannot thrive without the participation of his younger brothers, who must respect and support his authority.

Lakshmana is a devoted younger brother in his devotion to Rama and his full disregard for his own wants.

Lakshmana is far from faultless, despite his courage, heroism, and complete devotion to Rama.

He lacks Rama's tolerance and discernment, and he acts before he thinks.

When Bharata pursues the two brothers after they have gone into exile, Lakshmana assumes that Bharata is taking advantage of the chance to murder them in order to smooth his path to the throne.

Lakshmana plots to assassinate Bharata, but Rama's logic prevents a disaster.

Shurpanakha, a demon princess and sister of Ravana, Lanka's demon-king, is Lakshmana's most grievous blunder in judgment.

When she makes sexual approaches toward Lakshmana, he mocks her before mutilating her.

Ravana kidnaps Rama's wife, Sita, in order to exact vengeance on the brothers.

Lakshmana, like all the characters in the Ramayana, is neither good nor bad; he has many qualities as well as some serious defects. 


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Hinduism - Who Is Kabandha In Hindu Mythology?

 


 ("trunk with no head") In the Ramayana (the older of the two major Hindu epics), a demon confronts the epic's protagonist, god-king Rama, and Rama's brother Lakshmana.

Kabandha was a monarch of the gandharvas, or heavenly musicians, in a previous incarnation, but his head was thrust down into his body after a fight with the god Indra.

When Kabandha asks for a way to eat, Indra inserts a mouth into Kabandha's stomach.

When Rama and Lakshmana chop off his arms, Indra promises him that the curse will be broken.

As Rama and Lakshmana seek a jungle for Rama's abducted wife Sita, Kabandha approaches them and grips each of them in one of his extended arms.

When they realize they can't get away, Rama and Lakshmana each slice off one of his arms, and Kabandha requests the brothels to burn his corpse with his dying breaths.

The gandharva king emerges from the flames in his former form and instructs the brothers to seek aid from the monkey-king Sugriva while the corpse burns.

 

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Hinduism - Who Is Indrajit In Hindu Mythology? What Does Indrajit Mean?

 


 ("Indra's Conqueror") Indrajit is the son of the demon-king Ravana and his wife Mandodari in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics.

He is presented as the son of the deity Shiva himself in some later versions of the Ramayana, having been born after his mother had married Ravana.

Indrajit, like his father, is a great Shiva devotee (bhakta), and as a result of his devotion, Shiva teaches Indrajit how to become invisible.

This ability is clearly incredibly useful to a fighter, and it allows Indrajit to conquer Indra's celestial kingdom and return Indra to Lanka as a prisoner, thus his name.

Brahma travels to Ravana's realm of Lanka to secure Indra's freedom, in exchange for which Indrajit requests physical immortality.

When informed that this is impossible, Indrajit seeks a different power: that if he makes a particular sacrifice, he would be given horses and a chariot, allowing him to kill every opponent he encounters while riding in the chariot.

Indrajit undertakes this sacrifice as the god-king Rama and his companions are invading Lanka in an attempt to reclaim Rama's stolen wife Sita.

Brahma warns Rama of the danger, so he sends his brother Lakshmana to stop it.

Lakshmana successfully disturbs the sacrifice and kills Indrajit in the subsequent struggle.

 


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