Showing posts with label Lanka. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Lanka. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Is Vibhishana In Hindu Mythology?

 



Vibhishana is the younger brother of Ravana, the demon king of Lanka, in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics.

Vibhishana, Ravana, and their third brother, Kumbhakarna, practiced extreme physical asceticism (tapas) in their youth in order to win boons from the gods.


Unlike his brothers, who have chosen boons to improve their military skill and fame, Vibhishana requests that he stay virtuous in the face of peril, and this trait defines his life.


When Ravana gathers a council of war before fighting Rama's army, Vibhishana is the only one who votes against fighting and instead recommends Ravana to restore Rama's stolen wife, Sita, and seek Rama's forgiveness.

Ravana expels his brother from the city as a result of these comments, and Vibhishana joins Rama's army, where he battles courageously throughout the conflict.


Rama appoints Vibhishana king of Lanka after Ravana's death as a reward for his faithfulness and integrity.


In Indian mythology, demons (in this instance, the sort of demons known as rakshasas) are not intrinsically wicked, as Vibhishana exemplifies.

They are formidable creatures who may battle gods and mankind, yet they also possess many qualities.

Vibhishana is shown as a great devotee (bhakta) of Rama in the Ramcharitmanas, a vernacular retelling of the Ramayana authored by the poet-saint Tulsidas (1532–1623? ), in line with Tulsidas' emphasis on devotion above all other types of religious activity.


~Kiran Atma


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - Who Is Surasa In Hindu Mythology?

 

Surasa is the mother of all the Nagas, a class of lesser divinities who take the shape of serpents in Hindu mythology.

Surasa assumes the shape of a monstrous snake in the Ramayana, the older of the two major Indian epics, to test the fortitude of the monkey-god Hanuman, who leaps across the sea to Lanka in quest of Sita, the deity Rama's kidnapped wife.

Surasa informs Hanuman that no one can pass through her mouth without going through her mouth, and Hanuman responds by becoming bigger and larger.

Surasa's jaws spread wider and wider, and Hanuman shrinks to the point where he darts in and out of her mouth.

Surasa, impressed by Hanuman's cleverness and bravery, bestows her blessing on him.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - Who Is Ravana In Hindu Mythology?

 

Ravana is the ten-headed demon ruler of Lanka in the Ramayana, the first of the two major Indian epics.

Vishnu, in his incarnation as Rama, is born to vanquish Ravana.

Ravana is the reincarnation of Vishnu's guardian Jaya, who was cursed by a guru to be reincarnated three times as a demon, each time being destroyed by Vishnu.

Ravana is a rakshasa, a sort of demon with enormous physical strength and a variety of magical abilities.

In Indian culture, rigorous physical asceticism (tapas) is commonly thought to develop spiritual strength and bring boons from the gods, and he uses it to supplement these natural powers.

When the deity Brahma comes and instructs Ravana to pick his boon, Ravana demands that he be able to be slain only by humans.

This effectively makes him immortal, since his abilities are such that no average human will be able to injure, much alone kill him.

Ravana then proceeds to torment the gods, certain that they would be unable to stop him.

He starts with his half-brother Kubera, a lesser god who loses his house and all he has to Ravana.

Ravana's near-invulnerability gets the better of him, and the mighty demon starts to break all moral and ethical conventions.

He has a history of abusing and kidnapping women, which has resulted in a slew of curses from his defenseless victims, many of which prophesy his demise.

Rama's brother Lakshmana mutilates his sister Shurpanakha as a consequence of one of these curses.

Ravana is determined to revenge this insult, and he believes that abducting Rama's wife Sita is the best way to do it.

Ravana steadfastly refuses to listen to his wife Mandodari and brothers, who chastise him for his actions and implore him to return Sita and make peace with Rama.

His inflated pride and desire to revenge his sister's insult deafens him to their advice, and he pays the price for his obstinacy with his life when Rama kills him in combat.

Ravana, like other demons, isn't wholly evil by nature, but he is very strong and imperfect at the same time.

Ravana is said to be a devotee (bhakta) of the deity Shiva, and the Shivatandava Stotra, a hymn to the dancing Shiva, is sometimes credited to him.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.




Hinduism - What Is The Pushpak Viman In Hindu Mythology?

 


Pushpak Viman, ("Flower chariot") is the most renowned of the flying automobiles in Hindu mythology.

Vishvakarma, the celestial architect, designed the Pushpak Viman.

The term essentially describes an inanimate transport air/space craft that could navigate the Earthly and Celestial realms.

Sanjna, Vishvakarma's daughter, has married the Sun, but she is so dazzled by his radiance that she asks her father to dim his radiance so she may be with him.

Vishvakarma does this by removing part of the sun's rays, which are then fashioned into the Pushpak Viman and other divine weapons.

For a while, the minor god Kubera had possessed the Pushpak Viman, which he obtained as a reward for practicing extreme physical austerity (tapas).

It is eventually snatched from Kubera by the demon-king Ravana, who uses it to perpetrate many acts of oppression, culminating in the kidnapping of Rama's wife Sita.

Rama uses the Pushpak Viman to return to Ayodhya after killing Ravana, and then returns the automobile to Kubera.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.




Hinduism - Who Is Mandodari In Hindu Mythology?


Mandodari is the wife of the demon-king Ravana and the mother of Indrajit, Atikaya, and Akshakumara in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics.

Despite being Ravana's devoted and faithful wife, Mandodari often tells him that he made a mistake by stealing Rama's wife Sita.

She begs him to reach an agreement with Rama before fighting becomes inevitable.

Ravana refuses to do so because of pride and a desire to revenge his sister Shurpanakha's mutilation by Rama's brother Lakshmana.

Ravana's obstinacy ultimately cost him his life.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.




Hinduism - Where Is Lanka In The Context Of Hindu Mythology?

 

Lanka is the land of the demon-king Ravana in the Ramayana, the first of the two major Indian epics.

Although the epic's descriptions should be regarded as mythological and narrative tales than than a geographical survey, Lanka is occasionally connected with the present island of Sri Lanka, and southern Indian places such as Rameshvaram have been linked to events in the Ramayana.

Vishvakarma, the heavenly architect, had created Lanka for Kubera, a lesser god, but Kubera had been deposed by Ravana and his siblings.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - Who Is Lankalakshmi In The Hindu Pantheon?

 


Lankalakshmi is the name of the guardian goddess of Lanka, the demon-king Ravana's capital city, in the Ramayana, the older of the two major Indian epics.

Lankalakshmi is also the reincarnation of Vijayalakshmi, the goddess who was cursed by Brahma to serve as Lanka's guardian deity.

The curse will endure until an invader in the city defeats her, foreshadowing Ravana's demise.

The appearance of the monkey-god Hanuman, who jumps over the ocean in quest of the goddess Sita, whom Ravana has kidnapped, leads to this defeat.

In her role as a guardian goddess, Lankalakshmi sees Hanuman as an invader and assaults him.

Hanuman uses a tremendous strike to knock her out, ending the spell and signaling Ravana's demise. 



You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.


Hinduism - Who Is Indrajit In Hindu Mythology? What Does Indrajit Mean?

 


 ("Indra's Conqueror") Indrajit is the son of the demon-king Ravana and his wife Mandodari in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics.

He is presented as the son of the deity Shiva himself in some later versions of the Ramayana, having been born after his mother had married Ravana.

Indrajit, like his father, is a great Shiva devotee (bhakta), and as a result of his devotion, Shiva teaches Indrajit how to become invisible.

This ability is clearly incredibly useful to a fighter, and it allows Indrajit to conquer Indra's celestial kingdom and return Indra to Lanka as a prisoner, thus his name.

Brahma travels to Ravana's realm of Lanka to secure Indra's freedom, in exchange for which Indrajit requests physical immortality.

When informed that this is impossible, Indrajit seeks a different power: that if he makes a particular sacrifice, he would be given horses and a chariot, allowing him to kill every opponent he encounters while riding in the chariot.

Indrajit undertakes this sacrifice as the god-king Rama and his companions are invading Lanka in an attempt to reclaim Rama's stolen wife Sita.

Brahma warns Rama of the danger, so he sends his brother Lakshmana to stop it.

Lakshmana successfully disturbs the sacrifice and kills Indrajit in the subsequent struggle.

 


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.