Showing posts with label Madurai. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Madurai. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Is Known As Sundareshvara In The Hindu Pantheon?

 


(The "Handsome Lord") 

The deity Shiva's epithet when he appears as the goddess Minakshi's spouse.

Minakshi, the presiding goddess of the Minakshi temple in Madurai, Tamil Nadu, is the presiding deity of the Minakshi temple.

Look at Shiva.


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Hinduism - Who Is Goddess Minakshi In The Hindu Pantheon?

 


Minakshi (meaning "fish-eyed") is a Sanskrit word that means "fish-eyed." Minakshi is the presiding goddess of the Minakshi temple in Madurai, Tamil Nadu.

Her name alludes to her eyes' form (long and oval) as well as their fluttering movement, both of which are considered feminine beauty features in ancient India.

Minakshi was formerly a local divinity who served as the city's protector.

Minakshi grew in importance as Madurai grew in importance as the capital of the Pandya kingdom.

Minakshi is born with three breasts, which is already a clue that she is odd, and is nurtured by her parents as a male, according to her charter myth.

She swears that she would only marry a man who can beat her in war when she ascends to the throne in Madurai.

She battles and defeats all of the earth's rulers, but when she approaches the deity Shiva, she is overcome with modesty and turned from a fierce warrior to a meek and bashful girl.

Her third breast vanishes at this point, signaling the end of her unique status.

Minakshi and Shiva (in his Sundareshvara incarnation) get wedded.

Every year at the Chittirai festival in Madurai, their wedding is commemorated.

Minakshi remains a peculiar goddess, despite her metamorphosis in the charter tale.

A goddess's wedding generally signifies her domestication and servitude to her spouse.

Minakshi, on the other hand, is still the most significant goddess in Madurai, maybe due to her past role as the city's guardian deity.

Dean David Shulman, Tamil Temple Myths, 1980, has further information.


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Hinduism - Where Is Madurai In India?

 


On the Vygai River in Tamil Nadu, India, there is a temple town and a holy spot (tirtha).

The enormous temple devoted to Minakshi, the goddess, and her husband Sundareshvara is the most prominent attraction in Madurai.

Sundareshvara is a form of the god Shiva, while Minakshi is a local goddess who has grown into an important regional goddess.

The Nayak dynasty controlled southern India after the collapse of the Vijayanagar empire in the late sixteenth century, with the capital at Madurai.

Tirumalai Nayak (r. 1623-1659) erected most of the Minakshi temple, and his palace is another of the city's attractions.

The streets around the temple are divided into four circular processional loops, with the temple in the center.

The village was designed to resemble a lotus with layers of petals, with Minakshi's image at its core, around which everything revolved.

In terms of symbolism, the Minakshi temple was not only the heart of the city, but also the heart of the world.

Vijayanagar dynasty is another name for the Vijayanagar dynasty.


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Hinduism - How Prevalent Was Execution Via Impalement And Mass Impalement In Ancient And Feudal India?

 


One of the most popular methods of execution, which appears to have been especially popular in ancient southern India.

Impaling someone means piercing them with a sharp spike and killing them.

The most spectacular incident is said to have occurred at Madurai, when 8,000 Jain ascetics were impaled by one of the Pandya dynasties' rulers after the latter had left Jainism to become a Shaiva, or a Shiva devotee (bhakta).

The Nayanar saint Sambandar, who had converted the monarch and whose surviving poetry displays a great animus towards the Jains, is said to bear ultimate culpability for this, according to legend.

If this claim is accurate, it also reveals one of the few examples of religious persecution in Hindu India, which has been very accepting of other religious practices on the whole.

Murals created in the Minakshi temple in Madurai—whose construction predates the supposed event—as well as popular art of many types depict depictions of this mass impalement.


 

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Hinduism - What Is The Float Festival At Madurai's Meenakshi Temple?

 


On the full moon in the lunar month of Magh (January–February), the city of Madurai in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu has a festival. 

This is King Tirumalai Nayak's (r. 1623–1659) birthday, during whose reign substantial portions of Madurai's Minakshi Temple were constructed. 

The goddess Minakshi and her consort Sundareshvara (a Shiva epithet) are transported in procession to an artificial lake east of Madurai, where they are placed on lavishly painted floats and dragged back and forth over the lake's waters. 



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Hinduism - What Is The Festival Of Chittirai?

 






During the Tamil month of Chittirai (March–April), a ten-day celebration is held in the southern Indian city of Madurai. 




Madurai is known for its massive temple devoted to the goddess Minakshi, and the Chittirai festival commemorates Minakshi's marriage to Sundareshvara, the deity Shiva in his human form. 


Minakshi is a ferocious goddess who pledges to marry only a man who defeats her in combat, according to legend. 

She defeats and conquers all of the earth's rulers, but when she approaches Shiva, she is overcome with humility. 

The strong warrior is turned into a timid and shy girl, who marries him. 



Although a goddess's marriage usually signifies her domestication and submission to her husband, Minakshi remains the more powerful deity in this instance. 


She is Madurai's patron goddess, having a temple devoted to her, whereas Shiva is simply her consort. 

The wedding is celebrated with tremendous fanfare throughout the city, with the public procession of the deities through the city on temple chariots being one of the highlights. 



Dean David Shulman, Tamil Temple Myths, 1980; the event is also the subject of a film, The Wedding of the Goddess, produced by the University of Wisconsin at Madison's South Asia Center. 

 


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