Showing posts with label Nathpanthis. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Nathpanthis. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is Surat-Shabd-Yoga?

 

Surat-Shabd-Yoga is a mystical discipline practiced by the Radha Soami religious group that emphasizes the union (yoga) of the spirit (surat) with the Divine Sound (shabd).

The Supreme Being emits a Divine Sound that is constantly present.

Due of their preoccupation with worldly matters, most people are unable to hear it.

Anyone may become attuned to the Divine Sound and vibrate in harmony with it with adequate instruction and dedication to a real teacher (satguru).

Con touch with a real guru is the most crucial component of this path, since only a true guru has access to the divine and is considered an incarnation of the divine itself.

The single most crucial aspect in a person's spiritual growth is devotion to a real guru, and spiritual advancement is contingent on total submission to the guru's grace.

The imagery utilized by Guru Nanak, the first of the Sikh gurus, and the Nathpanthis before him have a lot in common with this metaphor of the Divine Sound and human resonance with it.

The excessive focus placed on a guru allows this religious discipline to be performed by almost anybody, and the majority of Radha Soami followers are housewives rather than ascetics.

Sudhir Kakar's Shamans, Mystics, and Doctors was published in 1990; Lawrence Babb's Redemptive Encounters was published in 1987; and Mark Juergensmeyer's Radha soami Reality was published in 1991.


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Hinduism - Who Was Matsyendranath?


According to legend, he was the master of the sage Gorakhnath and the founder of the Nathpanthis, a community of renunciant ascetics who are Shiva worshipers (bhakta).

Minanath is another name for Matsyendranath.

Matsyendranath obtained his training from Shiva himself, according to the Nathpanthi legend, by assuming the shape of a fish (the terms matsya and mina both mean "fish") and listening while Shiva was instructing his wife Parvati.

See George Weston Briggs, Gorakhnath and the Kanphata Yogis, 1973, for more information on Gorakhnath and the Nath tradition.

Also see tantra.


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Hinduism - Who Is A Jogi?

 


 (adept) (variant of yogi) An appellation for ascetics of many kinds.

It often refers to the Nathpanthis, disciples of Gorakhnath, the instructor.

The fact that yoga, especially hatha yoga, is one of the key foci in their religious life has earned them the moniker "yogis." 

The Aghoris may also be referred to by this word.

 


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Hinduism - Who Is Gopichand?

 

The princely protagonist of The Song of Gopichand, an allegorical tale popular in northern India and even Bengal, where it is known as The Song of Manik Chandra.

The narrative depicts Gopichand's struggles, in which he loses his kingship due to the whims of destiny but finally reclaims it after several hardships and losses.

Aside from the tale, the Nathpanthis, an ascetic society reportedly created by Gorakhnath, are also mentioned in the song.

Some in this group thought that by improving their bodies via yoga, they would become eternal.

This thought is expressed in the song by Gopichand's mother Mayana, who has control over Death himself.

Mayana's religious preceptor is described as a low-caste sweeper in some versions of the narrative, but in others it is the sage Gorakhnath himself.

G.A. Grierson published two versions of this song in the Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, the first in 1878 and the second in 1885.


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