Showing posts with label Nayanars. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Nayanars. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Was Sundaramurtti Among The Nayanars?

 

 

 (8th century) The last of the Nayanars, a group of sixty-three poet-saints from southern India who were Shiva worshippers (bhakta).

The Nayanars, along with their contemporaries the Alvars, who were Vishnu worshipers, drove the revival of Hindu religion by their fervent devotion (bhakti) to a personal deity, which they expressed through songs sung in Tamil.

Sundaramurtti, like his forefathers Appar and Sambandar, actively opposed the heterodox sects of the time, particularly the Jains, whom he despises in his poems.

The Devaram, the most sacred of the Tamil Shaivite texts, is composed of the hymns of the three most important Nayanars—Appar, Sambandar, and Sundaramurtti.

Sundaramurtti's inventory of the sixty-three Nayanars is significant since it is the earliest written source for Tamil Shaivite hagiography.


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Hinduism - Who Was Cekkilar, The Nayanar?

 



The Periya Puranam, a hagiographical chronicle of the sixty-three Nayanars, was written by Cekkilar (12th c. C .E .). 



Between the seventh and ninth centuries, the Nayanars were a group of sixty-three Shaiva poetsaints who lived in southern India. 


In contrast to Buddhists and Jains, the Nayanars, together with their Vaishnava counterparts, the Alvars, led the revival of Hindu religion. 

Both the Nayanars and the Alvars placed a strong emphasis on ardent devotion (bhakti) to a personal god—Shiva for the Nayanars, Vishnu for the Alvars—and expressed this love via Tamil hymns. 





Cekkilar was a minister in the court of the Chola dynasty's monarch Kullottunga II (r. 1130–1150 C.E.), according to legend. 


Cekkilar was irritated by the king's love for a Jain epic poem, so he wrote his own to divert the king's attention. 

The Nayanars are portrayed in his book as examples of Shiva devotion, despite their sometimes harsh acts. 

In every instance, however, the devotion between the devotee (bhakta) and the god shows itself in daily life, bringing the saints to ultimate freedom. 




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Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.