Showing posts with label Paramahamsa. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Paramahamsa. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Was Paramahamsa Yogananda Or Mukunda Lal Ghosh?

 

Yogananda, Paramahamsa, Mukunda Lal Ghosh was born in 1893 and died in 1952.

Self-Realization Fellowship founder and modern Hindu instructor.

Yogananda was one of the first Hindu missionaries to arrive in the United States.

In 1920, he traveled to Boston to speak at the International Congress of Religious Liberals, but he never returned to India.

He finally made his home outside of Los Angeles, where he created a center and spent the remainder of his life.

He was considered somewhat of a curiosity during his early years in America, and there are photographs of him with President Calvin Coolidge.

Yogananda's teachings were primarily based on the ancient Yoga Sutras' ash tanga yoga, but he also emphasized the theory of kriya ("active") yoga, which is said to hasten spiritual achievement.

The Self Realization Fellowship is basically an American organization with historical origins in India, and most of Yogananda's adherents and both of his successors were Americans.

See Paramahansa Yogananda's Autobiography of a Yogi, published in 1997, for further details.


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Hinduism - Who Is A Mandaleshvar?


 ("Lord of the Region") is a title given to a person who is in charge of Respect term for the ascetics appointed to lead the Dashanami Sanyasis' Naga class in their disputes with Christian missionaries.

The Dashanami Nagas are renunciant ascetics who are Shiva worshipers (bhakta) who had previously worked as merchants and mercenary troops.

Their improvisational talents made them good soldiers, but they lacked the necessary preparation for formal debate.

The Nagas picked the Mandaleshvars from among the more erudite Paramahamsa ascetics to provide a more cogent and compelling counter-narrative to Christian missionaries.

As a Mandaleshvar, an ascetic serves as the spiritual counsellor and teacher to the Dashanami Naga members of the akhara, who see him as a spiritual preceptor on par with their own gurus.


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Hinduism - Who Is A Mahamandaleshvar Among Dashanami Sanyasis' Naga akharas?


 ("The Region's Great Lord") When one of a Mandaleshvar's followers is selected as a Mandaleshvar while the preceptor is still alive, it is referred to as a term of respect.

Mandaleshvars are knowledgeable ascetics who oversee the Dashanami Sanyasis' Naga akharas, a tradition that dates back to the eighteenth century.

The Dashanami Nagas are renounced ascetics who are Shiva worshippers (bhakta) who formerly worked as merchants and mercenary soldiers.

Their toughness made them good fighters, but it left them unprepared for a formal debate with Christian missionaries.

Mandaleshvars were picked from among the most knowledgeable Paramahamsa ascetics in order for the latter to present a more cohesive and telling opposition; he is also the Nagas' teacher and spiritual advisor.

The enshrinement of a Mandaleshvar's student is therefore considered as elevating his teacher's status even higher.



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Hinduism - Who Are The Kutichaka?


 (“appreciating the opportunity to remain at the house”) One of the Hindu ascetics' four categories.

The foundation for these four sorts was their livelihood, which was much less significant for ascetic identity than sectarianism or organizational affiliation in practice.

The Kutichaka is the least revered of the four, with the others being Bahudaka, Hamsa, and Paramahamsa (in order of increasing reverence).

The Kutichaka is an ascetic who lives in a dwelling (kuti) built by himself or his sons and begs his sons and relatives for sustenance.


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