Showing posts with label Ravana. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Ravana. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is The Hindu Practice Of Worship of Tools?

 



Ayudha Pooja is a ritual historically done by members of specific artisan communities on the festival of Dussehra.

There are two different charter stories associated with this celebration, both of which depict the victory of good over evil.

It is commemorated as the day when the hero Rama defeated the demon Ravana, as well as the Goddess's victory over a demon called Mahishasura.

For the craftsmen, such worship symbolizes the value of their instruments as a way of earning a living, and it is also thought that such propitiation would ensure prosperity the following year.

Weapons Worship is a term used to describe the worship of weapons.

On the holiday of Dussehra, a popular ritual among the warrior classes used to be performed (usually occurring within October and November).

There are two separate founding stories for this event, both of which celebrate the victory of good over evil.

It is commemorated as the day when the hero Rama defeated the evil Ravana, as well as the Goddess's victory over a demon called Mahishasura.

Given the martial tone of both charter stories, it's easy to understand how it'd be connected with soldiers and combat, and therefore a day to worship one's weapons as a symbol of the god.

According to traditional belief, any activity undertaken on this festival day would unfailingly succeed, hence Dussehra has long been a favorite day for military campaigns to begin.

Because Dussehra falls after the conclusion of the monsoon rains, when travel is practically impossible, it is also a good time from a strategic standpoint.


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Hinduism - Who Is Ravana In Hindu Mythology?

 

Ravana is the ten-headed demon ruler of Lanka in the Ramayana, the first of the two major Indian epics.

Vishnu, in his incarnation as Rama, is born to vanquish Ravana.

Ravana is the reincarnation of Vishnu's guardian Jaya, who was cursed by a guru to be reincarnated three times as a demon, each time being destroyed by Vishnu.

Ravana is a rakshasa, a sort of demon with enormous physical strength and a variety of magical abilities.

In Indian culture, rigorous physical asceticism (tapas) is commonly thought to develop spiritual strength and bring boons from the gods, and he uses it to supplement these natural powers.

When the deity Brahma comes and instructs Ravana to pick his boon, Ravana demands that he be able to be slain only by humans.

This effectively makes him immortal, since his abilities are such that no average human will be able to injure, much alone kill him.

Ravana then proceeds to torment the gods, certain that they would be unable to stop him.

He starts with his half-brother Kubera, a lesser god who loses his house and all he has to Ravana.

Ravana's near-invulnerability gets the better of him, and the mighty demon starts to break all moral and ethical conventions.

He has a history of abusing and kidnapping women, which has resulted in a slew of curses from his defenseless victims, many of which prophesy his demise.

Rama's brother Lakshmana mutilates his sister Shurpanakha as a consequence of one of these curses.

Ravana is determined to revenge this insult, and he believes that abducting Rama's wife Sita is the best way to do it.

Ravana steadfastly refuses to listen to his wife Mandodari and brothers, who chastise him for his actions and implore him to return Sita and make peace with Rama.

His inflated pride and desire to revenge his sister's insult deafens him to their advice, and he pays the price for his obstinacy with his life when Rama kills him in combat.

Ravana, like other demons, isn't wholly evil by nature, but he is very strong and imperfect at the same time.

Ravana is said to be a devotee (bhakta) of the deity Shiva, and the Shivatandava Stotra, a hymn to the dancing Shiva, is sometimes credited to him.


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Hinduism - What Is The Pushpak Viman In Hindu Mythology?

 


Pushpak Viman, ("Flower chariot") is the most renowned of the flying automobiles in Hindu mythology.

Vishvakarma, the celestial architect, designed the Pushpak Viman.

The term essentially describes an inanimate transport air/space craft that could navigate the Earthly and Celestial realms.

Sanjna, Vishvakarma's daughter, has married the Sun, but she is so dazzled by his radiance that she asks her father to dim his radiance so she may be with him.

Vishvakarma does this by removing part of the sun's rays, which are then fashioned into the Pushpak Viman and other divine weapons.

For a while, the minor god Kubera had possessed the Pushpak Viman, which he obtained as a reward for practicing extreme physical austerity (tapas).

It is eventually snatched from Kubera by the demon-king Ravana, who uses it to perpetrate many acts of oppression, culminating in the kidnapping of Rama's wife Sita.

Rama uses the Pushpak Viman to return to Ayodhya after killing Ravana, and then returns the automobile to Kubera.


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Hinduism - Who Is Meghanada In Hinjdu Mythology?


 ("Thunderous roaring") Meghanada is one of the epithets of Indrajit, son of the demon king Ravana, in the Ramayana, the older of the two major Indian epics.

Take a look at Indrajit.


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Hinduism - Who Is Manthara In Hindu Mythology?

 

Manthara is the hunchbacked maid of King Dasharatha's wife, Kaikeyi, in the Ramayana, the older of the two major Indian epics.

Kaikeyi's mind is steadily poisoned by Manthara's whisperings against Dasharatha's son Rama, the god-king who is the epic's protagonist.

She persuades the queen that if she and her son Bharata are permitted to survive after Rama is crowned Dasharatha's heir, they would be no better than slaves.

Kaikeyi is persuaded by Manthara to claim two boons that Dasharatha granted her years ago.

With the first boon, she orders Rama to be exiled to the jungle for fourteen years, and with the second, she orders Rama's son Bharata to be anointed heir in his stead.

The earliest version of the epic, Valmiki's Ramayana, portrays Manthara as a true villain.

Although, given the concept in karma, her physical impairments would have been perceived as showing moral and spiritual deformities as well, there is little explanation for her behavior.

Manthara's actions is finally attributed to the gods in the Ramayana, authored by the poet-saint Tulsidas (1532–1623? ), who send the goddess Saraswati to muddle Manthara's mind, putting in motion the sequence of events leading to the demon Ravana's destruction.

Tulsidas, in typical Tulsidas manner, gives the incident a more altruistic spin, linking it to Rama's ultimate reason for being born on Earth.


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Hinduism - Who Is Mandodari In Hindu Mythology?


Mandodari is the wife of the demon-king Ravana and the mother of Indrajit, Atikaya, and Akshakumara in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics.

Despite being Ravana's devoted and faithful wife, Mandodari often tells him that he made a mistake by stealing Rama's wife Sita.

She begs him to reach an agreement with Rama before fighting becomes inevitable.

Ravana refuses to do so because of pride and a desire to revenge his sister Shurpanakha's mutilation by Rama's brother Lakshmana.

Ravana's obstinacy ultimately cost him his life.


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Hinduism - Who Is Lakshmana In Hindu Mythology?


Lakshmana is one of King Dasharatha's sons with his wife Sumitra, and the younger half-brother of Rama, the epic's protagonist, in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics.

Lakshmana is the ideal younger brother throughout the Ramayana, living only to serve and assist Rama.

When Rama is exiled to the forest for fourteen years, Lakshmana follows him like a shadow the whole time, first as a forest ascetic, looking for Rama's stolen wife Sita, then fighting heroically in the battle with Ravana's army, and ultimately returning to serve Rama at his court in Ayodhya.

Many of the Ramayana's characters are archetypes for Indian cultural beliefs.

As with his brother Bharata, Lakshmana represents the perfect younger brother.

Brothers are the center of the joint family in northern India.

Sisters, on the other hand, stay at home after marriage and live with their married families.

Every generation's oldest brother ultimately ascends to the position of joint family leader.

The oldest brother, who has main authority and responsibility for the whole family, cannot thrive without the participation of his younger brothers, who must respect and support his authority.

Lakshmana is a devoted younger brother in his devotion to Rama and his full disregard for his own wants.

Lakshmana is far from faultless, despite his courage, heroism, and complete devotion to Rama.

He lacks Rama's tolerance and discernment, and he acts before he thinks.

When Bharata pursues the two brothers after they have gone into exile, Lakshmana assumes that Bharata is taking advantage of the chance to murder them in order to smooth his path to the throne.

Lakshmana plots to assassinate Bharata, but Rama's logic prevents a disaster.

Shurpanakha, a demon princess and sister of Ravana, Lanka's demon-king, is Lakshmana's most grievous blunder in judgment.

When she makes sexual approaches toward Lakshmana, he mocks her before mutilating her.

Ravana kidnaps Rama's wife, Sita, in order to exact vengeance on the brothers.

Lakshmana, like all the characters in the Ramayana, is neither good nor bad; he has many qualities as well as some serious defects. 


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Hinduism - Where Is Lanka In The Context Of Hindu Mythology?

 

Lanka is the land of the demon-king Ravana in the Ramayana, the first of the two major Indian epics.

Although the epic's descriptions should be regarded as mythological and narrative tales than than a geographical survey, Lanka is occasionally connected with the present island of Sri Lanka, and southern Indian places such as Rameshvaram have been linked to events in the Ramayana.

Vishvakarma, the heavenly architect, had created Lanka for Kubera, a lesser god, but Kubera had been deposed by Ravana and his siblings.


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Hinduism - Who Is Lankalakshmi In The Hindu Pantheon?

 


Lankalakshmi is the name of the guardian goddess of Lanka, the demon-king Ravana's capital city, in the Ramayana, the older of the two major Indian epics.

Lankalakshmi is also the reincarnation of Vijayalakshmi, the goddess who was cursed by Brahma to serve as Lanka's guardian deity.

The curse will endure until an invader in the city defeats her, foreshadowing Ravana's demise.

The appearance of the monkey-god Hanuman, who jumps over the ocean in quest of the goddess Sita, whom Ravana has kidnapped, leads to this defeat.

In her role as a guardian goddess, Lankalakshmi sees Hanuman as an invader and assaults him.

Hanuman uses a tremendous strike to knock her out, ending the spell and signaling Ravana's demise. 



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Hinduism - Who Is Khara In Hindu Mythology?

 


Khara is one of the demon-king Ravana's siblings in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics.

Khara works with his brother Dushana to revenge the dignity of their sister Shurpanakha, who had her ears and nose cut off by Rama's brother Lakshmana.

Rama defeats the demon army in a violent fight, slaying Khara and Dushana.

Shurpanakha seeks revenge against their brother Ravana after seeing her two brothers' defeat.

Ravana believes he won't be able to kill Rama in combat, so he decides to revenge his sister by capturing Sita, which sets the tone for the rest of the epic.

 

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Hinduism - Who Is Kubera Or Kuber In The Hindu Panthen?


In Hindu mythology, a minor god who guards the northern quarter as one of the eight Guardians of the Directions.

Kubera is thought to reside in the Himalayan highlands, surrounded by legendary animals including yakshas, nagas, and kinnaras that serve him.

He is tremendously obese, and he is immensely rich, thanks to the mineral wealth stored in the mountains.

Kubera is the half-brother of Ravana, Lanka's demon king, as well as Kumbhakarna and Vibhishana.

Kubera had a different mother than the other three sons of the deity Vishravas.

Ravana snatches Kubera's aerial chariot, the Pushpak Viman, despite their relationship.

As a result of Ravana's infamous actions, Kubera backs Rama's attempts to defeat Ravana. 


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Hinduism - Who Is Jaya?

 


Vaikuntha, one of the gatekeepers of the deity Vishnu's celestial home, is cursed, along with his brother Vijaya, to be born three times as a demon (asura) and destroyed by Vishnu each time.

When they prevent Sanaka from seeing Vishnu, he bestows this curse on them.

The two are born as Hiranyaksha and Hiranyakashipu, who are slaughtered by the Boar avatar and the Man-Lion avatar, respectively, in their first incarnation.

Ravana and Kumbhakarna are their second incarnations, and both are destroyed by Vishnu's Rama avatar.

They reincarnate as Shisupala and Dantavaktra in their last incarnation and are murdered by Vishnu's Krishna avatar.

They return to their responsibilities as Vishnu's guardians after the curse's criteria have been met.

 


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Hinduism - Who Is Indrajit In Hindu Mythology? What Does Indrajit Mean?

 


 ("Indra's Conqueror") Indrajit is the son of the demon-king Ravana and his wife Mandodari in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics.

He is presented as the son of the deity Shiva himself in some later versions of the Ramayana, having been born after his mother had married Ravana.

Indrajit, like his father, is a great Shiva devotee (bhakta), and as a result of his devotion, Shiva teaches Indrajit how to become invisible.

This ability is clearly incredibly useful to a fighter, and it allows Indrajit to conquer Indra's celestial kingdom and return Indra to Lanka as a prisoner, thus his name.

Brahma travels to Ravana's realm of Lanka to secure Indra's freedom, in exchange for which Indrajit requests physical immortality.

When informed that this is impossible, Indrajit seeks a different power: that if he makes a particular sacrifice, he would be given horses and a chariot, allowing him to kill every opponent he encounters while riding in the chariot.

Indrajit undertakes this sacrifice as the god-king Rama and his companions are invading Lanka in an attempt to reclaim Rama's stolen wife Sita.

Brahma warns Rama of the danger, so he sends his brother Lakshmana to stop it.

Lakshmana successfully disturbs the sacrifice and kills Indrajit in the subsequent struggle.

 


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Hinduism - How Prevalent Was Human Sacrifice In Hinduism? What Are The Instances Of Human Sacrifice In Hindu Mythology?


Human Sacrifice is a term used to describe the ritual act of sacrificing a human being.

Human sacrifice was not common in Hindu religious life in the past, but it was not unknown.

One of the common mythic motifs in the worship of certain fierce and powerful deities is for devotees (bhakta) to offer their own heads to the Goddess as the ultimate sacrifice and act of devotion, but experts aren't sure how often this was done.

The demon king Ravana, for example, is said to have cut off nine of his ten heads before the god Shiva granted him divine power.

The Bengali saint Ramakrishna is also credited with the determination to carry out this act, though the goddess Kali intervened before he could do so.

The temple of the goddess Kamakhya in Assam was the one place where human sacrifice was unquestionably a regular practice.

This temple is part of the Shakti Pithas, a network of Goddess-sanctuary sites that stretches across the Indian subcontinent.

Each Shakti Pitha commemorates the location where a piece of the dismembered goddess Sati fell to earth and took on the form of a new goddess.

The body part in this case was Sati's vulva, and Kamakhya became a very powerful goddess due to the presence of such a highly charged part of the female body.

She was reportedly offered the heads of 140 men when the new temple was dedicated in 1565, and this practice continued until the British put an end to it in 1832.

The men who were offered as human sacrifices were said to be volunteers who believed they had been summoned by the goddess to do so; in the time between announcing their intention to be sacrificed and their deaths, they were treated as virtual divinities, having been consecrated to the goddess.

For more information, see E. A. Gait's 1963 book, A History of Assam.

 


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