Showing posts with label Shaiva Siddhanta. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Shaiva Siddhanta. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is Pasha In Shaiva Siddhanta Hindu Philosophical School?


 (“noose”) One of the weapons carried by several of the divinities in Indian mythology, including Ganesh and Yama.

The noose represents Ganesh's capacity to tie (and release) barriers as the "Lord of Obstacles," while Yama, the deity of death, uses it to pull the soul from the body upon death.

Pasha is also the term given to Shiva's power of illusion (maya), via which he entraps and enthralls unenlightened individuals in the Shaiva Siddhanta religious group (pashu).

The Shaiva Siddhanta school is defined by the trinity of pasha, pashu, and Shiva as lord (pati).


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - What Is A Pashu? Who Is Considered A Pashu?

 


 (“beast”) The name for an unenlightened individual, who is considered to have a human body but is no better than an animal, in the philosophical system known as Shaiva Siddhanta and the secret, ritually based religious practice known as tantra.

This lack of consciousness is caused not by inborn dullness, but by the activity of maya, Shiva's power of illusion wielded as lord (pati).

The Shaiva Siddhanta school is defined by the triad of pashu, pati, and the bindings of illusion (pasha).


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - Who Was Manikkavachakar?

 

(9th c.) Tamil poet-saint and creator of the Tiruvachakam ("holy words"), who was a devotee (bhakta) of the deity Shiva.

Along with the Nayanar poet saints, Appar, Sambandar, and Sundaramurtti, he is regarded the fourth major figure in the Tamil Shaivite tradition.

Manikkavachakar's songs are viewed as the climax of the older devotional (bhakti) tradition and provide testament to the depth of his own religious experience.

These hymns also served as the foundation for the Shaiva Siddhanta philosophical school's development, making him a key figure in southern Indian Shaivism.

Glenn Yocum's Hymns to the Dancing Siva, published in 1982, has further material.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.