Showing posts with label Shakti Pithas. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Shakti Pithas. Show all posts

Hinduism - Where Is The Nilachal Hill In India?

 

Nilachal Hill is a sacred location (tirtha) overlooking the Brahmaputra River, some six miles outside Guwahati in the contemporary state of Assam.

Nilachal Hill is famous for its temple dedicated to the goddess Kamakhya, one of India's most powerful goddesses.

This is one of the Shakti Pithas, a network of Goddess-sanctuary places that stretches throughout the Indian subcontinent.

Each Shakti Pitha commemorates the location where a piece of the goddess Sati's severed body fell to earth and took on the shape of a new goddess.

Sati's vulva is reported to have fallen to earth at the Kamakhya temple; the goddess's image is a natural gap in the rock around which the temple has been erected.

Kamakhya is particularly powerful since it comes from the most sexually stimulated portion of the female anatomy.


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Hinduism - Who Is Maya Devi?

 


Maya Devi is a Local goddess, whose home is in the northern Indian town and holy city of Haridwar, is said to be a form of Durga.

According to local legend, the Shakti Pithas, a network of holy locations to the Goddess that stretches throughout the subcontinent, is where her temple would be erected.

Maya Devi was Sati's navel, and each Shakti Pitha commemorates the spot where a bodily part of the dismembered goddess Sati descended to earth and took shape as a different goddess.

Although this assertion is not supported by other Shakti Pithas literature, the place is said to be exceedingly ancient.

Mayapur, which means "city of Maya," is one of the earliest names for the Haridwar area.


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Hinduism - Who Is Goddess Mansa Devi In The Hindu Pantheon?

 


Mansa Devi  is a Hindu goddess. One of the nine Shiwalik goddesses and the presiding deity of Manimajara, a small town in the Shiwalik Hills near Chandigarh.

This is one of the Shakti Pithas, a network of Goddess-sanctuary places that stretches throughout the subcontinent, according to local legend.

Each Shakti Pitha commemorates the location where a piece of the goddess Sati's severed corpse fell to earth and took on the shape of a different goddess; Mansa Devi was Sati's head.

The term "mansa" means "wish," and it is said that Mansa Devi would fulfill any desire brought to her by a devotee (bhakta).

In the holy city of Haridwar, there is another temple of Mansa Devi on the hill above the bathing (snana) ghats; here, too, the officiants promise that the presiding goddess would grant all one's requests.

The Manimajara's founding story Mansa Devi depicts her power and compassion for her worshippers during the reign of the Moghul emperor Akbar.

Akbar assigns a Rajput ruler to oversee the Manimajara region.

The chieftain is unable to pay his taxes one year because the crops have been damaged by harsh weather.

The chieftain is imprisoned, but one of Mansa Devi's worshippers is moved by his predicament and asks her to intercede on his behalf.

The chieftain is liberated and the taxes are canceled; when he realizes how this occurred, he is so thankful that he builds a shrine in her honor.


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Hinduism - Where Is Kalahasti? Who Is Kalahasteshvar?


In the southern state of Andhra Pradesh, some fifty miles east of Tirupati and 125 miles northwest of Madras, there is a temple and holy spot (tirtha).

The bhutalingas ("elemental lingas"), a network of five southern Indian locations devoted to the deity Shiva, including Kalahasti.

Shiva is worshiped as a linga, a pillar-shaped item that represents his symbolic form, in each of these locations, and the linga is said to be made from one of the five primordial elements (bhuta)—earth, wind, fire, water, and space (akasha).

Kalahasti's linga is related with the element of wind, and Kalahasteshvar, the "Lord of Kalahasti," is Shiva's incarnation there.

Kalahasti is also one of the Shakti Pithas, a network of Goddess-sanctuary places spread over the Indian subcontinent.

Each Shakti Pitha commemorates the location where a body part of the forgotten goddess Sati fell to earth and became the shape of a new goddess; in the case of Kalahasti, the body part was Sati's left shoulder.

The sanctity of Kalahasti is therefore enhanced by the presence of two immensely powerful and holy places dedicated to two separate deities.

 


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Hinduism - Where Is Kalighat?

 


Kalighat is a temple devoted to the goddess Kali in modern-day Calcutta's southern part.

This temple is hundreds of years old and is regarded one of Calcutta's most prominent temples.

The name of the city is said to be an anglicized form of the temple's name.

According to local legend, Kalighat is one of the Shakti Pithas, a network of holy locations dedicated to the Goddess.

Each Shakti Pitha commemorates the location where a piece of the goddess Sati's severed corpse fell to earth and took on the shape of a new goddess; in the case of Kalighat, the body part was one of Sati's toes.


 


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Hinduism - Who Is Goddess Kalika Devi?

 

Name of both a shrine and its presiding goddess in the Shiwalik Hills (foothills of the Himalayas).

Kalika Devi is one of the Shiwalik deities and is said to be a manifestation of Kali.

The temple is located in the town of Kalka, which is located on the route between Chandigarh and Simla.

The figure of Kalika Devi, like that of many other Shiwalik deities, is a natural stone outcropping.

This is regarded as the Goddess's self-manifested (svayambhu) form.

Unlike many other Shiwalik goddesses, the Hindi literature on this shrine does not state that it is part of the Shakti Pithas, a network of holy locations related mythically as places where a body part of the dismembered goddess Sati fell to earth.

Instead, the literature praises the temple for its grandeur and might.

Local priests identify it as the location where Sati's hair fell to earth, according to the literature.

This demonstrates both the power of pamphlet literature in directing pilgrim traffic and the importance of connecting one's place to the Shakti Pithas' network.

Kalika Devi's head is said to be the protrusion of stone that creates her appearance.

Kali assumed the guise of a lovely lady and came to the temple to perform celebratory songs during the Navaratri festival, according to legend.

Her voice and attractiveness had such an impact on the local king that he asked her to marry him.

Kali was enraged by the king's remark and cursed him to lose his realm.

She also forced the temple image to begin sinking into the dirt as a symbol of her anger.

She permitted the image's head to stay exposed at the request of an enthusiastic follower.

 

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Hinduism - What Is The Kalimath?

 

Kalimath - (“Kali's Residence”) In Uttar Pradesh's Himalayan mountains, there is a village and a holy spot (tirtha).

Kalimath lies roughly ten kilometers from Guptakashi on a minor tributary of the Mandakini River; the Mandakini is one of the Himalayan tributaries that merge to form the Ganges.

Kalimath is one of the Shakti Pithas, a network of holy locations dedicated to the Goddess, according to local legend.

Each Shakti Pitha commemorates the location where a piece of the goddess Sati's severed body fell to earth and took on the shape of a new goddess.

According to local legend, Kalimath is the location where Sati's vulva landed.

It assumed the shape of the goddess Kali there, thereby linking a highly charged female bodily part with a strong and sometimes deadly Goddess form.

The Goddess image at the temple is a metal plate a little more than a foot square with a little triangle carved out in the middle, an aniconic emblem of the Goddess.

This plate is said to cover a pit—a clear sign of the portion of Sati's corpse that is said to have fallen there—but the region underneath it is considered so holy that peering beneath it is banned.

The notion that Kalimath is where Sati's vulva descended to ground exemplifies the Indian holy landscape's flexibility.

A far more commonly acknowledged tradition connects this specific body part to the Kamakhya temple in Assam.

Competing claims are widespread in the Indian holy landscape, since individuals typically create them to increase the holiness and status of their particular spot.

Many Hindus seem unconcerned by such apparent inconsistencies, presumably because they believe that a single Goddess is responsible for all of her many manifestations.




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