Showing posts with label Vata. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Vata. Show all posts

What Does Sattva Mean In Yoga?



Table Of Contents
THE KEY TO EXPAND TIME IS SATTVA.
THE HOLISTIC EDGE.
TAMAS IN RAJAS LIFESTYLES.
MAINTAINING A LIFESTYLE OF EQUILIBRIUM.


THE  KEY TO EXPAND TIME IS SATTVA. 




Sattva is one of the three gunas (natural characteristics) in yogic philosophy. 


  • It is the attribute of purity and tranquility
  • The other two gunas are tamas, which represents darkness and lethargy, and rajas, which represents energy and passion, and the aim is to balance these three characteristics as much as possible in your everyday life.


There are many therapy regimens in Ayurveda. Rather of stressing about rajas and tamas, one strategy is to concentrate on increasing sattva. 


  • Another way to deal with the maha gunas is to balance excess tamas with a little amount of rajas, or to decrease excess rajas with a small amount of tamas.
  • You may begin to push prana (life energy) not just throughout your physical body but also into your mental body to produce a heightened level of awareness after you have balanced your outer koshas via diet, lifestyle changes, and a yoga practice.



THE HOLISTIC EDGE.


Unlike Mechanistic healing, the Holistic approach everything is interdependent and interrelated.



The comprehensive system may seem complex, yet the method is quite reasonable. 


  • When we compare the human body to a machine, its processes seem to be extremely basic if we ignore awareness. 
  • Machines are simple to humans since they were created by humans and can be understood by them. 
  • Humans, on the other hand, are much more complex than any machine. 
  • Machines operate on orders and are not aware of their surroundings. 
  • Humans have a sense of judgment or intelligence (buddhi), and as a result, they have the ability to make their own decisions. 
  • In comparison to a computer network, this makes human-to-human contact very difficult. 




It's impossible to utilize holistic medicine without also living a holistic way of life, and it's also impossible to live a holistic life in secret since it affects every area of your life. 


  • You can't disregard your job situation, personal connections, social conduct, or sexuality; if one of these is out of balance, it gradually impacts the others, setting off a chain of bad occurrences. 
  • The holistic approach rejects chance theory and stresses that everything occurs for a purpose. 
  • Chance, according to the mechanistic view of existence, has a significant influence in cosmic events and human life. 




Many individuals who are influenced by this viewpoint have extremely fragmented lives. 


  • They are expected to do their duties in a machine-like manner, because after all, there is a widespread assumption that there is just a material world. 
  • As a result, the existence of the soul as the source of awareness is denied. 
  • This mechanical perspective of existence rejects the idea of a latent spiritual force that exists within all of us, that may be awakened via sattva (see also the previous chapter), and that can be utilized for good. 
  • Many diseases and illnesses are caused by a lack of inner quiet and serenity, as well as other associated sattvic characteristics. 




Our lives are highly unbalanced and dominated by rajas and tamas, with little sattva. 

  • This is due to the imposition of the mechanistic perspective. 
  • We examined the six-dimensional equilibrium that humans should strive towards. 
  • Each of the six dimensions is linked, and an imbalance in one of them leads to an imbalance in the rest of one's life. 



People are always "in a rush." Time is meticulously scheduled, often a year, two years, or even many years ahead of time. 


I met a lady from Switzerland while on vacation on the island of Bali. 

 

She expressed herself by saying,

 

"People in Bali believe that we Europeans are extremely lucky and happy because we are wealthy. They have no idea that we work nonstop and will never be able to enjoy the easy life that they have on this island." 



This is absolutely correct! 

When I go from Bangalore to a Himalayan facility, I get the same feeling. 

The people who dwell in the Himalayan mountains' interior live modest yet peaceful lives. 

When I return to Bangalore, on the other hand, I observe the prevalent craziness caused by people's very "busy" and hectic lifestyles. 




TAMAS IN RAJAS LIFESTYLES


There is a significant degree of tamas in rajas-dominated lifestyles. 



In today's world, there is a lot of competition. When it comes to employment, people aren't always honest. This has an impact on everyone of us. 


  • To persuade someone to purchase a thing, a salesman, for example, must use misleading reasoning. 
  • To promote its anti-health, anti-environment goods, big business tells a lot of falsehoods. 
  • A farmer pollutes the environment with pesticides, while industrial pollutants contaminate our drinking water. 



There are many rajas and tamas in life. There isn't enough sattva. 


In the true sense, there is no quiet or serenity. People are too busy, even during their vacations, which are once again controlled by the rajas. 

  • Rajas spend the most of their free time on a daily basis. 
  • In general, watching television is rajas and tamas, and if done for an extended period of time, it may disrupt vata and kapha. 



People continue to follow a daily pattern dominated by rajas and tamas, with rajas-dominated leisure time. 


  • Rajas rule throughout the day while tamas rule at night. 
  • They enter a tamas state of mind throughout the night since sleep is tamas.
  • Their sleep, however, is mixed with rajas owing to the frenetic activities of the day. 
  • The following day starts, and they are once again in a condition of rajas and tamas. 
  • Life continues in this manner until some of them are unable to bear it any longer. 
  • Some people slip into a predominating tamas condition after a lengthy time of hyperrajas. 
  • As a result, people get sad or succumb to another severe illness. 



MAINTAINING A LIFESTYLE OF EQUILIBRIUM.


It is critical that we better arrange our lives and intermix our activities during the day and sleep at night with sattva in order to achieve equilibrium. 




We will be able to work with a peaceful mind, feel relaxed, and be able to endure pressure at work if we can bring a balance with sattva in the rajas and tamas elements of our life. 


  • Stress or strain produced at work will not damage our health if we are able to take energy from the infinite source (the soul) via sattvic techniques. 
  • Similarly, if we can obtain sattvic sleep with our efforts, we would be revitalized, waking up invigorated after a good night's sleep. 
  • Sattva is beneficial for lifespan, health, and increased productivity. 



You can do more in less time if you train your mind to achieve inner calm. 


  • In addition, sattva is necessary for maintaining balance in the three mental processes, since without it, we eventually develop a humor imbalance. 
  • Let's wait and see what occurs. Excessive rajas leads to vata imbalance over time. 
  • It also causes sleep disruptions, which is a vata-related activity. 




Excessive rajas, or too much activity during the day, should be balanced by serenity and tranquility at the mental level; if this is not done, unrest will be carried to sleep time. 


  • This implies that the day's disruptions, stress, and confusion must be brought to a halt with deliberate effort. 
  • Otherwise, you fall asleep because your body is weary, but your mind is not at ease. 
  • You may also be unable to sleep if the nature of your job does not physically exhaust you. 
  • If you have a vata constitution, not getting enough sleep may lead to constipation the following day. 
  • Constipation can deplete vata even more, and you may feel weary and stiff the next day when you wake up. 
  • You may also have a dry throat and be restless at night. 



As a result, an imbalance in one of the six main components responsible for body/mind activity and mental characteristics sets in motion a chain of events. 


  • Vata is the most readily decreased humor of our day, owing to the preponderance of rajas in our contemporary manner of life. 
  • We live in a vata society, as I frequently remark. 
  • We may keep our humor from being vitiated and avoid health issues by incorporating sattva into our everyday life. 

Thus, we must strive to better incorporate the sattvic style of life.




You may also want to read more about Ayurveda here.


You may also want to read more about Kundalini Yoga here.

You may also want to read more about Yoga here.


You may also want to read more about Yoga Asanas and Exercises here.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.






Yoga, Karma, And Ayurveda - What Is The Meaning Of Prakriti?

 



TABLE OF CONTENTS
PRAKRITI — UNDERSTANDING NATURE AND HARMONY'S FOUNDATION.
BEHAVIOR AND PRAKRITI.
PRAKRITI AND KARMA .
GETTING TO KNOW YOURSELF.
SATTVA FOR HARMONY AND BALANCE.
PERCEPTION OF OTHERS.
TEAMWORK AND PRAKRITI.
PERSONNEL SELECTION.
PROFESSION SELECTION BASED ON SAMSKARA, KARMA, AND PRAKRITI.




PRAKRITI — UNDERSTANDING NATURE AND HARMONY'S FOUNDATION. 



Here, I'm addressing Prakriti, or your True Inner Nature and Essence. 


  • Your prakriti is observed and manifest via your looks(outward appearance), base animalistic magnetism, behavioral inclinations or dispositions, lifestyle choices, current health, external environmental influences,  and personality characteristics
  • You know you should eat and live according to your prakriti, and the physical balance you strive to preserve via these multifaceted efforts also helps you maintain your mental equilibrium. 
  • In the Samkhya system (darshan) of Indian philosophy, Prakriti ( meaning  “nature,” or “source” in Sanskrit) is material nature in its primordial condition, everlasting and beyond perception. 
  • When prakriti (female) comes into touch with purusha (male), a process of evolution begins, leading to the formation of the current material universe via various stages. 
  • Prakriti is made up of three gunas (“matter qualities”), which are the cosmic elements that make up all of nature. 
  • Simply prakriti is active in the Samkhya perspective, whereas the spirit is contained inside it and only watches and experiences. 
  • The spirit's extrication from prakriti (moksha) is based on its own awareness of its complete distinction from it and non-involvement in it. 
  • The word svabhava (“own being”) was employed in early Indian philosophical writings to denote material nature in a similar way to prakriti.
  • To this point, I've just discussed the basic function of prakriti on an individual level. This element of Ayurvedic knowledge may also be used to a group. 



Working with this energy may help us establish a productive and pleasant work environment. 


  • Personality conflicts slow down productivity and create an uncomfortable environment. 
  • You may create a working group built on understanding and compassion for each other if you pay attention to the individuals you work with and attempt to understand them from their basic nature. 
  • You may also employ individuals based on their suitability and competence to do a certain task. 
  • You may also pair individuals together such that their personality types complement the rest of the group. 


You can prevent a lot of workplace conflicts and irritations, which means you'll like your job and look forward to coming to work. Let's have a look at how it works in practice. 





BEHAVIOR AND PRAKRITI. 



"He's exactly like he was when he was a kid," we hear older parents remark lovingly of their middle-aged children's responses and conduct. 


  • Couples often attempt to alter one other for the "better," thinking that the partner's personality would improve. 
  • They eventually quit up, declaring, "I have given up; he or she will never change." If you look about you or watch yourself, you'll see that some patterns of behaving and reacting are ingrained in you. 
  • For example, whether it's the doorbell, the phone, or responding to a question, you react in a certain manner. 
  • If you are a vata-dominant per son, you will respond fast throughout your life. 



The psychological characteristics of vata-dominant individuals remain a part of their existence until their final days of life under normal circumstances (non-pathological). 


  • Similarly, kapha-dominant individuals have sluggish reaction times and responses, a difficulty to make fast choices, and a proclivity for deferring tasks until the following day. 
  • Because their basic character is a part of who they are, you can't expect them to change into vata persons. 
  • Those who are naturally impatient cannot wait for their meals, and if they must, they get annoyed and angry— the pitta-type. 


The characteristics mentioned above are a component of an individual's prakriti, or basic nature. 

This style of acting and behavior is a part of the individual since childhood. 



All living creatures, are a mix of body and spirit. 


  • The soul is a non-physical energy that is the source of consciousness. 
  • Five components make up the material body.                                                                                         
  • When the five components are combined with the soul, a living creature emerges, with the need to execute all of the fundamental physical tasks. 


The doshas, or the three humors, are in charge of this job. In other words, the five components combine to create the three humors, which is why I believe the most accurate translation of the doshas is "three vital forces of the body," rather than humors. 





PRAKRITI AND KARMA .




Let's look at some deep elements of prakriti to figure out what's preset and what we can do to alter things. 


  • Prakriti is determined by the constitution — sperm, ovum, uterus, mother's diet and behavior, time, and the mahabhutas (the five funda mental components), according to Charaka. 
  • These are the conditions under which a person was born. 



Who makes the decisions about our birth circumstances? 



Prakriti, or even vikriti (since some individuals are born with an imbalance of the humors and are not healthy at birth), is derived from an individual's past karma, as well as previous karmic ties with other people, which put him or her into a certain birth circumstance. 


  • Samskara is the sum total of all past karma, and it is because of your samskara that you have behaved in a certain way or had a certain passion from infancy. 
  • This does not, however, imply that you are doomed to a certain future. 
  • Your independence is based on your sense of discretion, which allows you to go on with your karma. 
  • This implies you have the ability to substantiate your point based on the outcomes of previous actions. 
  • Previous karma is referred to as daiva, while current karma is referred to as purushakara in Ayurveda. 



You must strike a balance between your daiva and purushakara for good health, harmony, and serenity. 


  • Your daiva offers a particular landscape, and you construct your present and future with personal work — or your current karma. 
  • Even if you all respond differently on the job and come from various backgrounds and socioeconomic statuses, the individuals you work with create a sort of karmic group. 
  • People that work together in major cities like Paris, London, Berlin, or New York come from many ethnic groups from all over the globe. 



You must consider Karma while bringing Ayurveda to the workplace. 


  • You may bring peace and harmony to the group and learn to work together more effectively if you understand your karma. 
  • You will remain healthy if you work properly since you will not be annoyed by your colleagues! Let's have a look at what you can do to foster this understanding and peace. 
  • When I say "harmony," please understand that I mean "harmony with the nature of your job," "harmony with the location where you work," and "harmony with the group of which you are a member." 





GETTING TO KNOW YOURSELF. 



It would be beneficial if everyone in the work group took the time to learn about their constitutional type. 


  • That is unlikely to happen. However, if you want to take control of your life, you must become conscious of your own habits and conduct in relation to your prakriti. 
  • Only then will you be able to appreciate the freedom you have inside a particular framework. 
  • You will be able to help others in the same manner if you get to know yourself in terms of your prakriti and watch your behaviors and responses closely. 

This method will allow you to observe yourself without being too involved, since the basic concept of prakriti allows you to recognize your limitations and understand that time is not confined to one lifetime or the brief boundaries of your memory. 



You also learn to watch people within their limits, with greater compassion and sympathy, as a result of this knowledge. 



  • Despite the limitations of your basic nature, each of you may maintain your balance and achieve inner peace and harmony with your current karma. 
  • Peace and harmony must begin with everyone of you separately in a specific activity atmosphere.
  • Then you'll be able to open up and cope with your connections with others. 



One of the most important skills you can bring to a job is knowing where you belong in. 


  • By taking the time to accomplish this, you may drastically alter your circumstances. 
  • I'm certain you've discovered your basic essence, or prakriti. 
  • In the current situation, it is critical to examine your behaviors and responses in order to create positive adjustments. 


Keep in mind that prakriti transforms into vikriti, and your conduct may alter throughout the vikriti (non-health) cycle. 


  • It's essential not to mistake your "regular" prakriti with vikriti if you're trapped in a vikriti mood for an extended period of time. 
  • Let's say your life becomes very busy, you're having trouble sleeping, you're yawning during the day, and you're making rash choices. This is a vikriti condition. 


It's conceivable that you're a vata type who suffers from vata diseases due to a lack of vata. 


  • It's also possible that your prakriti isn't vata at all, but rather the result of an overly vata lifestyle. 
  • To figure out your prakriti, go back to your childhood behavior and reactions. 
  • In any instance, whether your prakriti is due to the dominance of the same out-of-balance humor or you have vikriti owing to another humor, you should first and foremost restore your health. 


Assume you are a healthy individual with vata prakriti. 


  • Your vata vitiates when there are vata weather conditions, such as high winds, or when you didn't get enough sleep, or when you were at a party till late at night, or when you ate the incorrect food. 
  • You feel confused and anxious, irritable and easily agitated, and make rash choices when in this condition. 
  • In terms of your work, this sort of energy isn't conducive to efficiency. 

You must learn to recognize these variables and take the appropriate measures to prevent yourself from harming your body. 


  • Furthermore, you should be aware that when you are not at your best, you should refrain from making critical choices. 
  • You should be able to assess your shortcomings and defects and put them into context.



As a writer, for example, if I discover, either through students or on my own, that I have made a mistake or written instructions in such a way that my students were unable to understand what I was trying to teach, I investigate the circumstances in which I wrote that particular copy in order to determine the factors that influenced my work that day. 


Was it an angry phone call I got while I was writing, which proved to be a stumbling block in my communication? 

Was it the extreme heat or vata vitiation?

Why didn't I maintain my sattva state while working? 


Analyzing the past will enable us to rectify our errors and avoid repeating them in the future. 



You are all aware that there are days when nothing seems to go as planned. 


  • You're not very productive at work, and you're also not particularly pleasant. 
  • There are times when you recognize this and say, "Well, since I was up late last night, or because I didn't digest my meal well, or because I didn't sleep very well owing to whatever reason, and so on." "I don't understand why I'm like this today," you may remark at other times.
  • During one menstrual cycle, women's humors may alter, and their behavior may change as a result. 
  • There are also many elements that may take you from a state of health (prakriti) to a state of non-health (vikriti). This has an impact on both your job and your interactions with people. 



When you recognize that you are out of balance, you should attempt to restore your health using all reasonable techniques available. 


  • The issue may also be dealt with on a mental level. 
  • Even when you are out of balance, you should always do your hardest: this is achievable with a sattvic mental state. 
  • When you are not in touch with your environment and have some subjective symptoms of illness, you may bring bad energy into the workplace, either directly or indirectly. 
  • You may potentially start a cycle of issues at work without realizing what's causing them. 


You've all had days when you remark to yourself, "Nothing works today!" The serenity and quiet of your thoughts may assist or prevent you from starting a sequence of unpleasant responses at these moments. 

When you become conscious that you are not functioning at your best, you may call on your spiritual energy to assist you in this difficult circumstance. 



Spiritual energy is a latent reservoir of energy inside us. 


  • You awaken this dormant reservoir of energy by momentarily closing your senses to the outer world and stopping this line of thinking. 
  • In reality, the soul's vitality isn't really "dormant" in the traditional meaning of the term. 
  • The spiritual force is constantly flowing from the soul, but worldly activities — which are dominated by rajas and tamas — create a blanket of darkness over it and obstruct its path. 
  • When you use personal effort and different yoga techniques to quiet your mind, the blanket of darkness dissipates, and you are led by energy from the soul. 
  • The tamasic characteristics (anger, impatience, jealousy, intolerance, etc.) vanish with the aid of this energy, and you are able to exhibit the virtues of compassion, love, tolerance, and so on. 
  • You may make an attempt to summon your sattvic energy to counteract undesirable characteristics that may be related to a brief condition of vikriti with some simple exercises. 



However, every effort should be made to move away from vikriti and into prakriti. 


  • If the different humors are out of balance, you may take the following urgent steps. 
  • Try to obtain quick rehef by drinking something hot, rubbing your ears, or sending prana to your head area if you have vata vitiation. 
  • Drink cold water or any cooling beverage if you have pitta vitiation, apply sandalwood paste to your forehead, and send prana energy to your solar plexus. 
  • If you're suffering from kapha vitiation, attempt some strenuous motions or quick walking, as well as rapid breathing exercises. 




SATTVA FOR HARMONY AND BALANCE. 



Sattva not only aids in the development of good characteristics when in vikriti, but also in bringing balance and harmony to daily life. 


  • Tolerance, love, and compassion are characteristics that contribute to a group's mutual understanding and support. 
  • On the one hand, these characteristics are essential for improving group efficiency, while on the other hand, they are necessary for individual originality. 
  • You will make errors no matter what the nature of your job is if you are angry, annoyed, or unhappy. 
  • One blunder leads to another, creating a vicious cycle of annoyance and rage. 
  • What I'm trying to say is that you should cultivate your mind's sattvic quality even if you're in perfect equilibrium. 



There are specific things that "we tend to do" in each of the seven kinds of prakritis. 


  • That is to say, each prakriti has its own set of negative traits, such as irritability, lethargy, intolerance, discontent, and so on. 
  • These characteristics may not show themselves in everyday life, but they may be elicited in a certain scenario. 
  • Even in highly charged situations, you should make an effort to maintain your balance by invoking sattva. 



I've included a few basic techniques that may be useful in this regard. 



To Achieve a Sattva State of Mind, Practice Breathing and Concentration 



1. Take a deep breath and direct prana energy into your solar plexus. 


    1. Allow it to remain there for as long as you can while focusing on the plexus area, which is where the soul resides. 
    2. Slowly and gently exhale. 
    3. Hold the lungs without air until all of the air has been expelled, while concentrating on the solar area. 
    4. This should be done three times. 
    5. Pronounce the mantra "OM shanti" at the conclusion of each breathing practice (universal peace, harmony, and stillness). 



2. Repeat the practice, but this time direct the prana energy to the head. 


    1. In the same manner, repeat the "OM shanti" mantra. 
    2. Repeat three times. 



3. Send prana energy to every area of your body during this last and third practice. 


    1. The energy should first travel from your head, then through your arms up to your hands, via your thorax and ab dominal area, and finally through your legs to your feet and toes. 
    2. Hold your breath and exhale gently and smoothly, allowing your energy to flow freely throughout your body. 
    3. Recite this mantra three times, remembering to say "OM shanti" each time. 
    4. Breathing nine times is part of these workouts. 
    5. In between, you may take a few more breaths. 
    6. It should take you no more than seven minutes to complete everything. 




PERCEPTION OF OTHERS.



You will begin to understand vikriti conduct once you have taught yourself to watch your acts and re actions in the context of your basic nature, or prakriti. 


  • At this stage, it's normal to see other individuals who share your viewpoint. 
  • It's a good idea to collaborate with your coworkers in the framework of their basic character. 
  • For example, if you have a vata personality and work with a kapha personality, don't get annoyed by their sluggish speed. 


Learn to have patience and consider the gradual development this individual may make as you move forward. 


  • People don't operate at your speed for a variety of reasons. 
  • Perhaps your colleague is dealing with personal issues. 
  • Consider one of your coworkers who is dreamy and absent-minded, who seems miserable, and who is unquestionably unproductive at work. 
  • This individual irritates you often. You hear from another colleague one day that this individual used to be extremely productive at work and always had a pleasant demeanor. 
  • She lost her 12-year-old kid in a car accident two years ago, and she hasn't been the same since. 
  • Your perspective about your coworker changes after hearing this sad tale, and you become more understanding and compassionate. 
  • Similarly, even if you are unaware of it, you may attempt to understand people who may have had previous life experiences in their own context. 



When people strive to understand one other's responses in the workplace, a sense of unity develops, and the group works on a more intimate level. 


This will motivate you to assist one another and to love and care for one another. 


  • My personal experience has shown that understanding others in the context of their prakriti has the benefit of reducing self-involvement and allowing individuals to accept their so-called negative characteristics without feeling ashamed, touchy, or sensitive. 
  • The group learns that some personality characteristics are connected to physiological responses and behavior patterns, and that pointing this out is not a form of condemnation. 
  • People also do not feel powerless since they recognize that there is a method to improve oneself that involves a shift in mindset or dietary habits. 


Let me give you an example to explain my point. 


In a group lecture, it is often difficult to call out people's personality characteristics. 

When I explain the three humors and how they operate at the body/mind level, however, the students begin to recognize and acknowledge their own unique qualities. 

They don't attempt to explain themselves by claiming that their rage is caused by the actions of others. 


When I suggest that kapha individuals put off work till the following day, or that they are daydreamers or sluggish, people readily accept it if they fit into this group.


  • They are ecstatic about the idea that they can change these traits by altering the foods they consume and incorporating certain yoga exercises into their daily routine, among other things. 
  • They no longer believe that their body and mind are two distinct things, or that they are in charge of their responses when they actually require nutritional advice. 


In a manner, the underlying emotions of guilt and self-blame are removed utilizing Ayurvedic knowledge of prakriti and personality types. 



People get a new feeling of independence and may begin to identify their own and others' traits. 


  • Knowing each other's prakriti may assist you cope with workplace interactions. 
  • There is a time and a place for everything. 


For example, you never ask a pitta person a question or discuss other work issues just before lunch. 

  • These individuals cannot tolerate hunger and get easily enraged just before a meal. 


Also, keep an eye on how you deal with pitta individuals when they come inside after being out in the sun. 


In windy conditions, Vata individuals get quickly tired. 

  • Allow them to unwind a little when they arrive at work while the wind is blowing. 


The kapha people are influenced by rainy, gloomy, dark winter days, therefore if you want to hold an important business meeting with them, invite them for a hot and spicy dinner. 



A rudimentary education in Ayurvedic knowledge may help to start a fruitful path of mutual understanding. 


  • People are sometimes perplexed by this style of thinking because it is so unlike to the mechanistic view of the world, body, mind, personality, and behavior. 
  • In every corporate scenario, a few easy changes may help create a more human and loving atmosphere, which leads to increased productivity and creativity. 




TEAMWORK AND PRAKRITI.



People in management positions may use these Ayurvedic principles to ensure that the appropriate people are in the right locations for effective management and productivity. 


They should look at people's prakriti before employing them for a certain position in this direction. 


For example, kapha people don't work well at night; pitta individuals don't perform well in hot nations doing field labor; and vata people don't work well outdoors in cold regions. 

    • Jobs that demand patience and tolerance will fit kapha personalities better. 

Pitta persons aren't often suited to such occupations. 

Vata individuals thrive in environments where fast responses are required. 



Management should avoid placing too many individuals of the same kind together when forming groups. 


  • An all-vata group may be confusing; add some kaphas to balance things out. 
  • When there are too many pittas together, particularly during the heat, it may lead to rage. 
  • An exclusive club of kaphas may create a sluggish environment in which nothing gets done fast. 


It is important to combine the various prakritis at work to prevent storm (vata), fire (pitta), and flood (kapha) situations. 

  • When working in pairs, however, avoid combining vata and kapha, since vata and pitta will be far more creative. 




PERSONNEL SELECTION.



It may be extremely helpful to observe the prakriti of new workers. 


  • It may assist you determine if the personality is appropriate for the kind of work you are providing, in addition to technical credentials. 
  • A profession that requires a lot of travel, for example, is not appropriate for kapha types since they are primarily house lovers. 
  • They may take the position and tell you that they are qualified, but there is a chance that they may get frustrated, which will ultimately impact their performance. 



Because of their impatience, Pitta persons may not be suited for retail sales management. 

Sales may fit kapha individuals better since they have greater patience and tolerance. 

When interacting with the general population, these two characteristics, patience and tolerance, are crucial. 



When we go to a job interview to recruit a new employee, we carry a lot of things with us. 


  • People who are hiring should be aware of the nature of the position, the specifics of the job description, and the other members of the team with whom they will be working. 
  • It's also crucial to understand how to assess individuals based on their outer look and conduct. 
  • The appearance of the skin, eyes, nails, and hair will reveal a variety of traits that may be used to classify people. 
  • The way individuals speak and respond in conversation provides more information. 
  • Although kapha individuals are sluggish to respond, they are less likely to misinterpret your remark than vata people are. 


By the time you reach the conclusion of a lengthy phrase, or if you speak about some element of the work for too long, fine-featured pitta types may indicate impatience — via facial expression. 




PROFESSION SELECTION BASED ON SAMSKARA, KARMA, AND PRAKRITI.




It would be beneficial if parents carefully watched their children and paid attention to the interests that "came from inside them," so that they could assist the children in choosing a career that was appropriate for them. 


  • Each of us has a unique samskara and therefore prakriti. 
  • It's possible that parents and children or siblings have different professional interests. 
  • It's very unusual for two siblings to have quite different interests and pursue careers in completely different areas. 



Parents should not force their own views on their children when it comes to choosing a career. 


  • Many parents feel compelled to impose a career on their children based on values such as "family honor or prestige," or simply the "convenience aspect" of an already established profession. 
  • As a result, not only do these people suffer for the rest of their lives as a result of being in the incorrect profession, but the harm is also compensated in far greater amounts. 


It has an impact on our whole society because those in the incorrect profession will continue to be frustrated on the job. 

Their general unhappiness will have an impact on their relationships with the individuals they deal with. In reality, this is a really important topic. You want to recruit individuals who will be pleased and productive as an employee and with their employer.




You may also want to read more about Ayurveda here.


You may also want to read more about Kundalini Yoga here.

You may also want to read more about Yoga here.


You may also want to read more about Yoga Asanas and Exercises here.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.


Ayurvedic Ingredients



Dictionary of Common and Uncommon Ayurvedic  Ingredients



Aduki- Also known as adzuki or feijao, this small dark red bean is native to Japan and China. Rich in nutrients, it is considered, like mung, to be a tridoshic bean. 

Agar agar- A buff-colored, translucent seaweed available in 12-inch bars or in flakes. Indigenous to India, agar-agar has been used since Vedic times as a food thickener and to make gels. Use warm water or other liquid to dissolve. Available in most health food stores and in Indian and Oriental grocery stores. May be used by all types. 

Ajwan (ajwain)- Also known as bishopweed, this tiny spice seed is related to caraway and cumin. Its delicate flavor resembles the combined tastes of lemon, pepper and thyme. Available in Indian and Oriental grocery stores and occasionally in health food stores. Good for Kapha and Vata types. 

Aloe vera- Called kumari in Sanskrit, aloe vera is bitter, astringent, sweet and cooling in nature. It is used in pancha karma therapy as a tonic, blood cleanser, mild laxative, and for douching. Excellent for Pitta, it may be used by all types. 

Aragvadha (purging cassia)- A family of the senna plant, the fruit, bark and pods are used in Ayurvedic purgative therapy. Pungent and bitter in taste and cooling in energy, the fruits, bark and pods are used primarily by Pitta and Kapha types. 

Arka (sadapushpi)- The root, leaves and flowers are known for their extensive use in Ayurvedic purgative and emesis therapy. The "milk" of the plant is known for its sharp potency, and a few drops of it is used to alkalize purgative decoctions. Arka is bitter and pungent in nature and is heating in energy. Good for Kapha, Pitta and Vata disorders. 

Ashwagandha- Bitter, astringent and heating in nature, this herb may be used primarily by Vata and Kapha types as a tonic, nervine, aphrodisiac and a rejuvenative. 

Atibala- This herb, like bala, is sweet and cooling and may be used by all three doshas, although it is most suitable for Pitta and Kapha types. Atibala is used as a mild laxative as well as a tonic and calming agent. 

Ayurvedic formulated oils- Amavathahara, anu taila, bilva, brahmi, chakra, dashamula, dhanvantari, kaseesadi, ksheerabala, masha, Narayana, nirgundi, pinda, padmaka, shatavari, sidda, yasti madhu. 

Ayurvedic formulated pills- Avipattkar, icchabhedhi, drakshadi, jalodharari, kutajaghana.

Ayurvedic medicated ghee- Tikta ghrita, maha tikta ghrita, brahmi ghrita, mati- kalyana ghrita, guggulu tikta ghrita. 

Bala- Sweet and cooling in nature, this herb may be used for all three doshas as a rejuvenative tonic and nervine. 

Besan- Chickpea flour. Good for Pitta and Kapha types and maybe used occasionally by Vata types. 

Bhringaraja- Bitter, sweet and cooling in nature, this herb may be used for all three doshas as a nervine, blood cleanser and tonic. 

Black cumin- Called kala jeera in Sanskrit, the black cumin is a relative of both the cumin and caraway plants. Used extensively in Vedic cooking, black cumin, like cumin, is considered good for all three doshas. It is pungent and bitter in taste and is used as a stimulant, blood cleanser and carminative. Available at Indian grocery stores. 

Brahma dandi (Mexican poppy)- Pungent, astringent and sweet in taste with heating energy, the root, seeds and flowers are used in pancha karma to soothe Vata disorders, and sometimes Pitta disorders. 

Brahmi (Indian pennyworth or thyme-leaved gratiola)- Also called gotu kola, the whole plant is used Ayurvedically. Bitter, pungent, sweet and cooling in nature, brahmi is used to promote memory, sleep, and longevity. It is used as a blood cleanser, to reduce internal bleeding and to alleviate heart disease and diabetes. Good for all doshas but excellent for Pitta disorders. 

Burdock root- This dark brown root of the burdock plant is long, thin and wiry and has medicinal properties. Bitter, pungent, sweet and astringent in taste with heating energy, this root is good for Pitta and Kapha types. Available in health food stores. 

Cardamom- Known as ela or elachi in Sanskrit, the cardamom pods and seeds are used extensively in both Vedic cooking and Ayurvedic medicine. Cardamom is sweet, pungent and heating in nature and may be used primarily by Vata and Kapha types as a carminative and stimulant, as well as to relieve mucus. It may also be used occasionally by Pitta types. 

Chana dhal- A variety of small chick pea, which is husked and split, this buff-yellow dhal is very popular in Indian cuisine. Best for Pitta and Kapha types. 

Chitraka- Pungent and hot in nature, this herb is used by Vata and Kapha types to promote digestion, regulate menstrual flow, and as a tonic for liver, spleen and intestine. 

Coconut- The whole coconut fruit is used extensively in India to make many wholesome products. Sweet in taste, the fresh and dried coconut as well as the coconut oil are used in Ayurveda as a neutralizing tonic and diuretic by Pitta and Vata types. Available at Indian and Oriental grocery stores. 

Dadima (pomegranate fruit)- Sweet, bitter and astringent in nature, the pomegranate fruit is used extensively in pancha karma therapy as a tonic and blood cleanser. It is also used to destroy bacteria, parasites, fungus and yeast in the body. Good for Pitta and Kapha types. 

Dashamula- A combination of ten Ayurvedic herbs, namely: ashwagandha, shatavari, yastimadhu, punarnava, arjuna, bala, bilva, gokshura, vidari and kumari, generally used in pancha karma therapy for Vata disorders. 

Dhanyaka (coriander leaves and seeds)- Used extensively in Vedic cooking as well as in Ayurveda, coriander is bitter, pungent and cooling in nature. It is good for all three doshas. 

Draksha- Sweet and cooling in nature, the grape powder, juice or medicinal wine is generally used in pancha karma therapies. Good for Vata and Pitta types, although Kapha types may use occasionally. 

Echinacea- A relative of the camel's thistle (utkataka), this herb is bitter, pungent and cooling in nature. Used for its antibiotic quality, echinacea also helps to induce sweating. Good for Pitta and Kapha types. 

Eranda (castor root and oil)- Pungent, sweet and heating in nature, castor root and oil are used in purgation therapy as a strong laxative causing rapid evacuation. Castor root and oil also calm the tissues and relieve pain. Good for Vata types. Fruits used in pancha karma (fresh fruit, fruit juice and dried fruit powder)- pilu, draksha, palasha, bilva, badri kanchanara (red and white variety), dadima, amalaki, bibhitaki, and haritaki.  

Ghee- Best made fresh , this clarified butter is also available in health food stores and Indian grocery stores. Ghee is excellent for Vata and Pitta uses. 

Gokshura- Sweet, bitter and cooling in nature, this herb may be used mostly by Pitta and Kapha types as a diuretic, tonic and aphrodisiac. 

Gotu kola- See Brahmi. 

Gourds used in pancha karma- Dokshi, koshataki (torai), koshaphala (bidali), katukumbi (bottle gourd), mahajali (kadwi torai). Generally the seeds, which are pungent and bitter, and fruits, which are cooling, are used in emesis therapy to relieve excess Kapha. Fresh gourds are available at Indian grocery stores. 

Gum arabic- Sweet and cooling in nature, gum Arabic is used as an emollient to the tissues as well as a tonic to calm the internal membranes. Good for Pitta and Vata types. 

Japa (shoe flower, or hibiscus)- The leaves, roots, flowers and buds are used in pancha karma therapy. Sweet, astringent and heating in nature, hibiscus is used as a blood cleanser, to relieve thirst and stop internal bleeding. Good for Pitta and Kapha types. 

Honey (madhu)- In Ayurveda, honey is known as yogavaha, since it enhances the therapeutic effects of the medicines which are added to it. Its unique qualities of sweet and astringent tastes, yet heating energy, make honey an excellent vehicle for carrying medicines deeply into bodily tissues, allowing penetration through the subtle tissues and pores. Adding to its uniqueness is the effectiveness of naturally aged honey in reducing obesity and diabetes. For obesity, honey is mixed in hot water. This is the only circumstance in which honey is combined with heat, since when heated or used in hot substances, honey becomes highly toxic in the body. Honey is excellent for Vata and Kapha disorders. Even though sweet, it reduces Kapha due to its dry, rough and heavy attributes. Although heating in nature, it may be used discriminately by Pitta types, especially as a medicinal carrier. Honey is used to alleviate conditions such as ulcers, bronchitis, asthma, hiccoughs, nausea, excessive thirst, bleeding, diabetes, eye diseases (when applied topically) and sore throat. Honey also promotes intelligence, strength and determination. 

Hot chili pepper- Native to tropical and semi-tropical climates, chili peppers come in an infinite variety of hotness. Those recommended in this book are the mediumhot variety, such as the one-inch long red or green chilies found in Indian, Oriental, and Latin American grocery stores. You can reduce the heat of a pepper by deseeding it. Cut off the stem and slice the pepper in two lengthwise. Use a dinner knife to scrape the seeds off. Alternatively, remove the stem by cutting around it and twisting or pulling it out of the pepper; most of the seeds should come out with the stem intact. Good for Kapha types although it may be used occasionally by Vata types. 

Unrefined brown sugar (jaggery and gur)- For millennia, jaggery and gur, both unrefined sugars, have been culled and preserved in India's villages. Jaggery is made from the juice crushed from the sugar cane, while gur is made from the sap drained from the coconut, date and palmyra palm trees. Much in demand in India, gur is made into several types of confections and offered at religious ceremonies. The season's first batch of gur is a sought- after delicacy. Jaggery and gur, available through Indian grocers, may be used interchangeably in the formulas and recipes in this book, along with unrefined brown sugar and Sucanat, available through health food stores. When used in milk preparations, unrefined sugars should be added towards the end of the cooking process. Jaggery, gur and Sucanat share smooth, heavy, oily, sweet and cooling qualities and are used primarily to reduce excess Vata and Pitta conditions. Kapha types should use these sugars sparingly since all sugars increase body fat. 

Jatamansi (Indian spikenard)- The root of this plant is used to relieve Pitta and sometimes Kapha conditions. Sweet, bitter and astringent in taste, jatamansi is cooling in nature. Karanja (Indian beech)- The leaves, seeds, bark and root are used extensively in pancha karma as an emetic, to relieve nervous tension, skin diseases and ulcers, and remove parasites from the body. Karanja is pungent and bitter with a heating energy, and is good for Kapha, Pitta and Vata disorders. 

Katuki (gentian plant and root)- Bitter, pungent and cooling in nature, gentian is used as a bitter tonic, blood cleanser, and to reduce bodily heat. Good for Pitta and Kapha disorders. 

Kudzu- The root of the kudzu plant is best known for its medicinal starch, which may also be used as a food thickener. Kudzu starch is similar to guduchi starch used in Ayurveda. Good for Pitta and Vata types, although it may be used occasionally by Kapha types. 

Lemon grass- Pungent, bitter and cooling in nature, lemon grass is good for all three doshas. Generally used to cool the system, or as a diuretic and sweat inducer. 

Lotus root- Known as kamala in Sanskrit, the lotus plant is native to ponds and lakes of Kashmir, China and Japan. Every part of the lotus plant is used medicinally in Ayurveda. The roots may be used fresh or dried for cooking, whereas the root powder may be used medicinally as a nutritive tonic and nervine for Pitta and Vata conditions. 

Madana (emetic nut)- Known for its extensive use in Ayurvedic emesis therapy, both the kidney-shaped fruit and seeds are used. Madana fruits and seeds are sweet, bitter and astringent in taste and cooling in energy, and may be used by both Pitta and Kapha types. 

Masoor dhal- Commonly called French lentil, this small bean when split resembles the red lentil. Traditional to North Indian cooking, this legume is best for Pitta and Kapha types, although seasoned appropriately, Vata types may use occasionally. 

Matar dhal- Common split peas, yellow and green. Best for Pitta and Kapha types. 

Mung dhal- Also known as mudga or green gram, this legume used since Vedic times is considered queen of the legumes because of its alkalizing and healing properties. May be used by all types, although Vata types need to spice appropriately. 

Musta- Bitter, astringent, pungent and cooling in nature, this herb is used to alleviate fever, thirst, diarrhea, as well as disorders and burning sensation of the skin. A natural blood cleanser, musta is good for Pitta and Kapha disorder uses, and may be used occasionally by Vata types. 

Neem- Also called nimba in Sanskrit, the neem tree grows predominantly in and regions of Punjab and Rajasthan. The entire tree is used medicinally in Ayurveda. Neem leaves are also used in Vedic cooking. Bitter in taste, neem is used primarily by Pitta and Kapha types to reduce conditions such as fevers and blood disorders, and as a bitter tonic. Fresh neem leaves, commonly called curry leaves, are available at Indian grocery stores. 

Nilini (indigo plant, root or dye)- Bitter, pungent and cooling, indigo is used in pancha karma therapy as an antibiotic and mild laxative. Good for Pitta and Kapha disorders. 

Padmaka (wild cherry bark)- this bark is used extensively in Ayurveda to relieve cough, bronchial spasm, palpitations, and skin and eye problems. Bitter, astringent and sweet in taste with cooling energy, padmaka is good for all types, but in particular for Pitta and Kapha. 

Pippali- A hot and pungent red pepper, two to three inches long, and one of the three ingredients in the Ayurvedic formula known as trikatu. It is excellent for Kapha types, and occasionally for Vata types, to provide heat to the body and to stimulate digestion. 

Plantain- Known as green banana in the United States and kacha kela in India, plantain is actually considered a vegetable. Used in the cuisines of South India and South and Central America, it is available in most Indian and Latin American grocery stores. Astringent, pungent and bitter in taste, plantain is a natural diuretic and may be used by Pitta and Kapha types. 

Pudina- The Sanskrit term for mint, pudina is mentioned as a vital tridoshic herb in ancient Ayurvedic texts. Especially pleasing to Pitta types, it is available fresh or dried in health food stores and farmers' markets. 

Punarnava- Bitter and cooling in nature, this herb may be used mostly by Pitta and Kapha as a diuretic, laxative and a rejuvenate. 

Rock Salt- Primarily mined in crystalline form from the seabeds of the Sindh mountain region in Pakistan, where it is known as senda namak; this salt has been used since ancient times in Ayurvedic foods and medicines. It may be used by all the types and substituted for sea salt in any of the recipes in this book. Its sister salt, known as kala namak, is a deep purple, highly pungent rock crystal that has a volatile taste and a smell resembling hard boiled eggs. It may be used occasionally (in small quantity) by Vata and Kapha types. 

Saffron- Known as kesar in Sanskrit, saffron threads are handpicked from the saffron crocus cultivated in India, China, the Mediterranean and Asia Minor. Carmine red in color with an exquisitely delicate taste, saffron is used in Ayurvedic medicine to tone the colon, cleanse the blood, regulate menstrual flow and as a rejuvenative. Saffron is also used extensively in India for making sweet drinks and desserts. It may be used by all three doshas. Available at Indian and Middle Eastern grocery stores, as well as through health food stores. 

Shatavari- Sweet, bitter and cooling in nature, this herb is used as a nutritive and calming agent, to regulate menstrual flow and to boost the hormonal system. Good for Pitta and Vata disorders. 

Soybean- Native to India, China and Japan, the soybean is a medium-sized bean, either black or white in color. This bean is highly nutritive, as well as cooling, making it an excellent choice for Pitta types. Seasoned appropriately, both Kapha and Vata types may use occasionally. The derivatives of the soybean, tofu and soy milk, may also be used accordingly. 

Sucanat- Trademark for a natural sugar made from sugar cane juice. Excellent for Vata and Pitta use. Kapha types may use sparingly. 

Tamal patra (Indian cassia)- A family of the cinnamon plant, the dried leaves and bark are used extensively in Ayurveda as a stimulant, blood cleanser and to promote perspiration through the skin. Pungent, astringent and sweet in taste with heating energy, the carnal patra is good for Vata and Kapha types, although Pitta types may also use occasionally. 

Tamarind- The pulp of the tamarind pod, used since ancient times in India. The tamarind tree is considered auspicious in Indian mythology, and its fruit is known as imli. Fresh tamarind is available in the tropics. Dried tamarind is packed in the shape of small bricks or slabs that can be prepared as a pulp. Dried tamarind, tamarind pulp (or paste), and a gel-like tamarind concentrate are all available in Indian grocery stores. Sour and sweet in taste, Tamarind is a natural stimulant and may be used by Vata and Kapha types, although Pitta types may also use occasionally. 

Trikatu- A combination of the three pungent herbs, ginger, pippali and black pepper, trikatu may be used primarily by Vata and Pitta types to boost digestion and to stimulate the system. 

Triphala- A combination of three ancient Ayurvedic fruits, amalaki, haritaki and bibhitaki, triphala is an excellent tonic for all three doshas. It is used to detoxify the system, as well as a mild laxative and sleeping aid. 

Turmeric- Also known as haridra in Sanskrit, turmeric comes from the underground rhizome of a perennial plant native to the humid regions of South India and Southeast Asia. Used extensively in both Vedic cooking and Ayurvedic medicine, turmeric is bitter, pungent and heating, but may be used for all three doshas as a blood cleanser, stimulant, and antibacterial agent. Available at Indian grocery stores and health food stores. 

Urad dhal- Also known as masha, or black gram, this small, black legume has been used since ancient times. When husked and split, the bean is white. Traditionally used in many South Indian vegetable dishes, urad is considered a tridoshic bean. 

Uva ursi- Astringent, bitter, pungent, and cooling in nature, this herb may be used by Pitta and Kapha types for its antiseptic and diuretic properties. 

Vacha (calamus, or sweet flag root)- Pungent, bitter and heating in nature, vacha may be used mainly by Vata and Kapha types as a stimulant, rejuvenative and decongestant. 

Valerian- Pungent and heating in nature, the herb valerian is used primarily as a sedative, nervine, and to tone the colon. Good for Vata and Kapha disorders. 

Vamsha rochana (bamboo)- Sweet, astringent and cooling in nature, this herb is excellent for Pitta and Vata disorders. It relieves mucus and acts as a tonic and calming agent to the tissues. 

Vidanga (embelia)- Pungent, astringent and heating in nature, the berries are used in Ayurveda to reduce appetite and fat and to destroy parasites, bacteria and fungus. Good for Kapha disorders. Wood powders used in pancha karma- Sandalwood, agaru and khadira. 

Yastimadhu (madhuka)- Sweet, bitter, and cooling in nature, licorice root and root extract are generally used in both emesis and purgation therapies. Good for Pitta and Vata disorders. 


You may also want to read more about Ayurveda and Holistic Healing here.