Showing posts with label Yogic. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Yogic. Show all posts

Supernatural Powers Of Yogis - Yogic Luminescence, Asceticism, And Psychic Power

 





    Long before the word yoga came to mean "spirituality" or "spiritual path," He compelled the Gods to grant His request that the heavenly river Ganges (Ganga) release its waters to flood and regenerate the parched earth by raising his arms high. 



    The archetypal ascetic (tapasvin) of the Vedic period is the ecstatic muni, not the obedient householder-sacrificer or even the elevated seer (rishi). 



    • The muni is part of what is known as the Vedic counterculture, which consists of religious people and organizations (such as the Vratyas) that followed their holy goals outside of Vedic society. 
    • The muni has been referred to be the forerunner of the later yogi? in that he resembles a lunatic in his euphoric oblivion. 
    • Many aspects of his lifestyle foreshadow the later avadhuta's unconventional conduct, which is celebrated in the Avadhuta-Gita and other medieval Sanskrit writings. 



    Tapas has survived as a separate tradition from Yoga.





    The Mahabharata epic, for example, documents this simultaneous growth. 

    Many famous tapasvins' tales are told, including Vyasa, Vishvamitra, Vashishtha, Cyavana, Bharadvaja, Bhrigu, and Uttanka. 



    Indeed, the tradition of tapas is given precedence over Yoga in several sections of the epic, indicating the passages' early antiquity. 


    • Tapas is usually achieved via chastity (brahmacarya) and the subjection of the senses (indriya-jaya). 
    • The inherent tendencies of the body-mind are believed to produce psychophysical effulgence (tejas), brightness (jyotis), tremendous power (ba/a), and vitality (ba/a) (vfrya). 



    Since Vedic times, another word strongly associated with asceticism is ojas (apparently related to the Latin a dt ustus, "majestic"). 


    • It refers to a certain kind of numinous energy that energizes the whole body and mind. 
    • Ojas is produced primarily via the discipline of chastity, as a consequence of sexual energy being sublimated. 
    • It is said to be so powerful that the ascetic may influence and alter his or her own fate as well as the fate of others. 
    • According to the Atharva-Veda, the deities attained immortality by practicing chastity and austerities. 



    Tapas is typically associated with the acquisition of psychic powers (siddhi), which often proved to be the downfall of unwise ascetics who abused their extraordinary abilities. 


    • The Tapas tradition unfolded against the backdrop of a magical worldview in which the cosmos is filled with personalized sources of psychic power, both in the Vedic Age and the Epic Age (virya). 
    • He also names tapas as one of the five observances or restrictions (niyama) and claims that austerity perfects the body and its senses. 
    • Tapas is clearly limited to the role of a warm-up exercise in this context. 





    Yoga is primarily concerned with meditation and its enhanced form, ecstatic transcendence (samadhi).


    • For millennia, the tradition of tapas has coexisted with the schools of Yoga, and this is also the case today. 

    The hagiography Maharaj tells the extraordinary tale of a modern tapasvin and saint who supposedly lived for years. 

    • Tapasviji Maharaj, the story's protagonist, was born into a royal family but abandoned everything in his late fifties and girded himself with a loincloth. 
    • He was regarded as a powerful ascetic and miracle worker throughout his lifetime. 
    • He achieved incredible feats of endurance, overcoming both pain and boredom. 
    • He stood on one leg with one arm extended skyward for three years, then never laid down for another twenty-four years while traveling several kilometers every day. 






    This saint drew a lot of attention in the United States because of his extraordinary lifespan, which he said was due to his receiving the kaya-kalpa or renewing therapy known to traditional Indian medicine three times. 

    • The effectiveness of this therapy is mainly determined on the patient's temperament, since he or she must be able to tolerate extended periods of near-complete isolation. 
    • Only a highly adept meditator of Tapasviji Ma­ haraj's caliber could conceivably bear the agony of self-denial. 
    • Clearly, the tapasvins of ancient and modern India have much to teach Western medicine.


    You may also want to read more about Kundalini Yoga here.

    You may also want to read more about Yoga here.


    You may also want to read more about Yoga Asanas and Exercises here.


    You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

    Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.





    Hinduism - What Is The History Of Indian Culture?

     


    A BIRD'S-EYE VIEW OF INDIA'S CULTURAL HISTORY. 

     


    The "animistic" and "polytheistic" Indian subcontinent is home to tens of thousands of local cults that have native shamanic roots, that perhaps reminds one of civilizations described in the African continent or resemble the Pscythian tribes of Eurasia. 


    •  However, Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism are four main spiritual traditions that rank among the global religions. 
    •  As a result, India's contribution to global spirituality is unparalleled. 


    More than any other race, Indians have shown great versatility in spiritual issues, inspiring many other countries and resulting in a much-needed spiritual enrichment of our spiritually sick Western civilisation in our century. 


    •  For millennia, Hinduism has been the main tradition of the Indian subcontinent, with more than 1.2 billion followers worldwide. 


    There are about 967 million Hindus in India, about 80% of the population which today stands over 1.4 billion people. 


    • Muslims, are the second biggest religious group, followed by Christians and Sikhs.
    •  In India, Buddhists make up a tiny minority, although they are well-represented in Sri Lanka (formerly Ceylon), Tibet, and Southeast Asia. 

     

    The word "Hinduism" is a bit of a misnomer. 

     

    • It is often used to refer to the whole culture of all Peninsula residents, excluding those who adhere to clearly recognized faiths like as Buddhism and Christianity. 
    •  More precisely, the term refers to a number of traditions that are historically and ideologically linked to the ancient Vedic civilization of more than 6,000 years ago, and which took on its distinctive shape around the turn of the first millennium c. E. 


    NOTE: The term "Hinduism" is used on this site in the broadest meaning possible. 

     

    Hinduism is a philosophy as well as a religion just as much as it can be a universal identity today. 


    •  It is a complete civilization with its own particular lifestyle, defined by a distinctive social structure: the caste system, much like the other global religions. 

    For thousands of years, Hindu society has been divided into four estates (varna), which are incorrectly referred to as castes: 

    1. the priestly or briihmana estate or class;
    2. the warrior or kshatriya class; 
    3. the "common people" or vaishya class (comprising farmers, traders, and artisans); 
    4. and the servile or shudra class. 

     

    This arrangement is believed to have its origins in the heavenly order. 

    •  The primal being or macranthropos is depicted as giving birth to the four estates as follows in the RigVeda's "Hymn of Man" (purusha-sfi.kta) (1 0. 90.  1 2): 
      • The brahmin is His lips; the warrior is made of His arms; the merchant is made of His thighs; and the servant is made of His feet. 
    •  Members of the slave estate were systematically barred from acquiring holy knowledge, and they ultimately became outcasts. 
      •  The feet are metaphorically "filthy," and the shudras' assignment to the Cosmic Man's lower limbs denotes their poor social position.
      • However, since the feet are an essential component of a fully functioning human person, the servile estate is also vital to society's well-being. 
      •  However, the shudras are karmically predestined for menial labor rather than intellectual, leadership, or creative activity, according to Vedic beliefs, since their awareness is of a darker color (varna). 


     It is a common misconception that the word varna ("color") relates to skin color and that the four states are divided by ethnic lines. 


    •  All four estates, however, are part of the Vedic Aryan social body, which, according to the Rig-Veda, valued the hue of the soul above ethnic traits. 
    •  Only the top three estates are regarded "twice-born" (dvija), meaning they have been "born again" via appropriate Vedic initiation. 
    •  Boys and girls from the priestly, military, and agricultural/mercantile estates were customarily married at the ages of eight, eleven, and twelve, respectively. 
    •  They were then given a holy thread (yajna-upavita, spelled yajno­ pavita) to wear permanently over the left shoulder, hanging diagonally across the chest, as part of the investiture (upanayana) ceremony. 

     

    Allowing marriages between members of different estates resulted in the formation of social groupings known as castes (jati). 


    •  As a result, a growing number of subcastes emerged. 
    •  The conduct and actions of members of various castes are tightly regulated by complex rules that control this social order. 
    •  This stratification very certainly resulted in marginalized people being labeled "outcasts" or "untouchables."

    Visionaries and reformers have often questioned this enormous social superstructure. 

     

    • The founder of Buddhism, Gautama, was one of the first to reject it. 
      •  Despite this, it has persisted throughout the ages and has had a strong effect on all other subcontinental cultures. 
    •  Social innovators who opposed the caste system in general had to oppose the Vedic revelation that legitimized it as well. 
    •  The caste system, with its social inequalities, is as natural to the devout Hindu as democracy is to us.
    •  The caste system is justified by citing the law of karma, much as we defend democratic principles by emphasizing the value of the individual. 
      •  Because of previous decisions and acts, each individual has a certain station in life. 
      •  Brahmins are brahmins because of their past lives' moral and spiritual endeavors. 
      •  Outcasts are outcasts for a variety of reasons, including a lack of desire for a better life or serious crimes. 



     Although the caste system offends our modern Western sensibilities, our forefathers formerly had beliefs and ideals that were comparable to those of traditional Hindus. 


    • The old social order, which was clearly hierarchical, was only questioned, contested, and eventually destroyed with the development of a strong individualism during the Renaissance. 
    •  Even our modern so-called egalitarian countries, with a super-wealthy elite at one end and a large number of impoverished people at the other, are not without social stratification. 



    The caste system's rigidity has been counterbalanced by a considerable ideological flexibility. 

    •  As a result, Hinduism has shown an incredible ability for absorbing even the most diametrically opposed elements inside itself. 
    •  For example, at one end of the spectrum is Shankara's extreme non­ dualist school, and at the other end is Classical Samkhya's rigorous dualist school, which, despite its atheism, is nevertheless considered one of Hinduism's six main philosophical systems (darshana). 
    •  The "cool" contemplative approach of nondualist Jnana-Yoga of the Upanishads on the one hand, and the passionate emo­ tionalism of certain schools of monotheistic Bhakti­ Yoga on the other, is another example of such radically divergent philosophical views. 
    •  The medieval way of devotionalism (bhakti-marga) is very syncretistic, including aspects from Islamic Sufism, for example. 
      •  The Allah-Upanishad, a late book written under Muslim influence, exemplifies Hinduism's all-inclusive ethos. 
    •  Even a well-defined religious tradition like Christianity fell prey to Hinduism's spongelike absorptive capacity, and had to be saved from Hinduization by Jesuit missionaries in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. 

    The inclusive nature of Hinduism is often misconstrued as universal tolerance, which is not the case. 


    •  There have been many examples of intolerance between different schools or factions of Hinduism throughout India's history, such as the long-standing conflict between the Vaishnavas and the Shaivas. 
    •  Hinduism is best understood as a complex sociocultural process that has evolved via the dynamics of continuity and discontinuity, or the survival of ancient forms and the incorporation of new cultural and religious manifestations. 
    •  Thus, Hinduism may be considered to have begun with Vedic civilization from one perspective (possibly as early as the fi fth millennium B . C. E. ). 
    •  From another perspective, the Vedic sacred culture and Hinduism as we know it now have genuine and significant contrasts. 
    •  Nonetheless, the general consistency has been remarkable, perhaps more so than the shifts that have occurred through time. 

     Most Western and Indian academics, until recently, emphasized the discontinuity in India's cultural development. 


    •  They perceived a conflict between the Indus Valley civilisation and the Vedic "Aryan" culture, which they believed originated outside of India. 
    •  However, this long-held Aryan invasion hypothesis is currently being actively contested. 
    •  A increasing number of academics in India and the West view this historical model as a scientific fiction that was created without sufficient evidence and has had a negative impact on our knowledge of ancient India's history and culture. 
    •  The book In Search of the Cradle of Civilization documents this significant shift in scholarly thinking. 

     

    All evidence suggests that the Sanskrit-speaking Aryans who wrote the Vedas were not barbaric nomads who arrived from outside India and wreaked havoc on the local people. 

     Rather, the available evidence suggests that they were genuine Indian natives. 


    Furthermore, there are compelling grounds to believe that the Vedic civilization, as represented in the Rig-Veda and the other three Vedic Samhitiis, was substantially, if not entirely, similar to the so-called Indus civilization. 


    You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

    Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.

    You may also want to read more articles on Yoga and Holistic Healing Here.



    Hinduism - Indian History Timeline



      In light of a new perspective, Hindu India's recorded history may be conveniently divided into nine eras, each expressing distinct cultural styles. 



      Because history is essentially continuous, the following chronology is extremely speculative, and the periodization is arbitrary to some extent. 


      •  Although the date of the first four historical eras is speculative, the conventional chronology presented in college textbooks is as well. 
      •  The Vedas must obviously be placed in a time period prior to the benchmark date of 1 900 B C E, as will be demonstrated soon. 



      How much earlier is unknown with any certainty, though astronomical references in the Vedas, as well as dynastic genealogies (from the Puriinas) and a list of sages in the Briihmanas and Upanishads, support a date of at least two thousand years prior to 1200 B C E, which is the commonly accepted but demonstrably incorrect date for the composition of the Rig-Veda. 


      • For identical reasons, the creation of the original Briihmanas must be pushed back in time before 1 900 B C E, just as the Vedas must be ascribed to an earlier era. 
      • In light of all of this, the earliest Upanishads, which are usually believed to have been written soon before the Buddha's time, should be put considerably earlier. 





      1. Pre-Vedic Period (6500-4500 B C E).

       


      Archaeological excavation in eastern Baluchistan (Pakistan) has uncovered a metropolis the size of Stanford, California, that dates from the middle of the seventh millennium B C E Archaeologists have named this early Neolithic settlement Mehrgarh, and it anticipated later urban civilization along the two major rivers of northern India: the Indus and the now-dry Sarasvati east of it. 


      •  Mehrgarh's population was believed to be about 20,000 people, which was a large number at the time. 
      •  The town seems to have been a center of technical invention and innovation, in addition to being a thriving marketplace for imported and exported products. 
      •  By the fourth millennium B C E, the hardworking inhabitants of Mehrgarh had mass-produced good-quality pottery and were cultivating cotton as early as the fifth millennium B C E Terra-cotta figures from about 2600 B C E show a striking aesthetic similarity to the art of the Indus-Sarasvati civilization as well as later Hinduism. 

       



      2.  Vedic Period (4500-2500 B C E).

       


      The development and cultural dominance of the wisdom tradition reflected in the hymns of the four Vedas characterize this era. 


      •  The majority of the hymns were written around the fourth millennium B C E, according to astronomical allusions in the Rig-Veda, with some hymns potentially going back to the fifth millennium B C E.

      The ultimate bottom limit of the Vedic period is set by a major natural disaster: the drying up of the powerful Sarasvati River over many hundred years, presumably as a consequence of geological and climatic changes. 

       

      • Around 3100 B C E, the Yamuna River altered its path and stopped flowing into the Sarasvati, becoming a tributary of the Ganges instead. 
      •  Around 2300 B C E, the Sutlej, the Sarasvati's largest tributary, began to flow into the Ganges. 
      •  The Sarasvati, formerly the largest stream in Northern India, had dried up by 1900 B C E The many settlements along its banks were soon abandoned and eventually buried by the enormous Thar Desert's dunes. 



      Given the age of the Vedic poems and the fact that the Sanskrit-speaking Aryans were not foreign invaders, we can only come to one conclusion: the Vedic people lived in India at the same time as the so-called Indus civilization. 


      • Furthermore, the cultural world as reflected in the Vedic hymns is in no way contradicted by the archaeological remnants of that civilization. 
      •  As a result, we must conclude that the inhabitants of Harappa and Mohenjo Daro, as well as the hundreds of other cities along the Indus and Sarasvati rivers, were the same as the Vedic Aryans. 
      •  Furthermore, as has been shown, Vedic mathematics impacted Babylonian mathematics, implying that the Shulba-Sutras containing Vedic mathematical theory must have existed about 1800 B C E. 
      • Because the Sutras are thought to be older than the Brahmanas, the Vedas' chronology may be pushed back to the third millennium B C E to account for these developments. 


      According to some academics, the epic battle recounted in the Mahabharata, which is traditionally dated to 3102 B C E, marks the end of the Vedic Age (which includes the Brahmanas and Upanishads). 


      • This marks the start of the Kali-yuga, the dark epoch described in subsequent Puranas, Tantras, and other texts. 
      • This date, however, is likely too early, and a date for the battle and the final redaction of the four Vedic hymnodies of about 1500 B C E is more plausible. 




      3.  The Brahmanical Age(2500-1500 B C E).



      The Vedic civilization moved east to the fertile banks of the Ganges (Ganga) River and its tributaries when the towns along the Sarasvati and Indus rivers collapsed. 


      •  The changing environmental circumstances in the new settlement regions, predictably, resulted in changes in the social structure, which became more complicated. 
      •  During this time, the priestly class evolved into a highly skilled professional elite who quickly came to dominate Vedic culture and religion. 
      •  The Brahmana literature, after which this period is called, captures the priesthood's theological-mythological speculations and ceremonial preoccupations. 
      •  The Aranyakas (ritual texts for forest-dwelling ascetics) and the vast Sutra literature dealing with legal and ethical problems as well as the arts were also created in the last decades of this period. 

       




      4. The Upanishadic/Post-Vedic Era (1500-1000 B C E).

       


      We enter a new era with its own unique philosophical and cultural character with the emergence of the first Upanishads. 


      •  They popularized the concept of internalized ritualism, or "inner sacrifice" (antaryajna), in combination with world renunciation. 
      •  We may discern the origins of India's psychospiritual technology in these anonymously written holy texts, which constitute the third level of Vedic revelation (shruti). 
      •  Yet, contrary to popular belief, the Upanishads do not constitute a dramatic departure from Vedic thinking; rather, they simply explain what is hinted at or present in a rudimentary way in the Vedas. 
      •  The end of the Post-Vedic Age is marked by the rise of non-Vedic religions such as Jainism and Buddhism. 






      5. The Epic or Pre-Classical Period (1000-100 B C E).



      India's metaphysical and ethical philosophy was in a state of flux throughout the fifth period of the current chronology. 

      •  It had progressed to the point where the different religious and philosophical systems were able to engage in a fruitful debate. 
      •  At the same time, we can see a positive trend toward unifying the many psychospiritual pathways, particularly the two major orientations of world renunciation (samnyasa) on the one hand and social duty acceptance (dharma) on the other. 


      This is where Yoga and Samkhya's pre-classical development takes place. 


      • The lessons contained in the Mahabharata epic, in which the oldest full Yoga book, the Bhagavad-Gita, is incorporated, finest exemplify the integrative, syncretistic ethos. 
      •  The enormous Mahabharata as we know it was written during this time period, but its core, which commemorates the epic battle between the Pandavas and the Kaurvas, dates from a far earlier period. 
      •  Because of the epic's importance throughout this time period, it is also known as the Epic Age. 
      •  Although the Ramayana epic is older than the Mahabharata, its historical core dates from almost thirty generations before the Mahabharata. 

       





      6. The Classical Period (100 B C E-500 C E).



      The six ancient schools of Hindu philosophy escalated their long-running battle for intellectual dominance throughout this period. 


      •  The Yoga-Surra of Patanjali and the Brahma-Surra of Badarayana were composed in the middle of this era, while the Samkhya marked the conclusion. 
      •  This is also the time when Mahayana Buddhism began to take shape, resulting in a burgeoning interaction between Buddhists and Hindus. 
      •  The fall of the Gupta dynasty, whose final major king, Skan¬dagupta, died about 455 C E, corresponds with the end of the Classical Age. 
        •  The arts and sciences thrived tremendously during the Gupta rulers; whose reign started in 320 C E 
        • Despite the fact that the monarchs were ardent Vaishnavists, they were tolerant of other faiths, allowing Buddhism to flourish and make its imprint on Indian culture. 
      •  The Chinese emperor Fa-hien was awestruck by the land and its people. 
        •  He describes affluent cities with many charity organizations, as well as rest stops for highway visitors. 

        





      7. The Tantric/Puranic Age (500-1300 C E ).



      We may see the beginnings of the great cultural revolution of Tantra, or Tantrism, about the middle of the first millennium C E, or perhaps earlier. 


      This tradition, whose remarkable psychotechnology, is the impressive result of millennia of labor to build a great philosophical and spiritual synthesis from the various divergent approaches that existed at the period. 


      •  Tantra, in particular, may be thought of as combining the highest metaphysical concepts and aspirations with common (rural) beliefs and practices. 
      •  Tantra came to be known as the gospel of the Kali Yuga (dark era). 
      •  Tantric doctrines had spread throughout the Indian subcontinent by the first millennium C E, affecting and transforming the spiritual lives of Hindus, Buddhists, and Jainas equally. 
      •  Tantra, on the one hand, was just a continuation of a millennia-old process of amalgamation and synthesis; on the other, it was really innovative. 
      •  Tantra was of the greatest importance on the level of spiritual practice, while adding nothing to India's intellectual repertory. 


       It advocated a spiritual lifestyle that was diametrically opposed to much of what had previously been deemed acceptable within the Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain traditions. 


      •  Tantra, in particular, gave intellectual legitimacy to the feminine psychosomatic component (known as shakti), which had long been recognized in more local Goddess worship cults. 
      •  This period is also known as the Puranic Age, since the vast encyclopedic collections known as the Purcinas were produced during this time period based on far earlier Puranic traditions (dating back to the Vedic era). 
      •  The Purcinas are holy narratives that have been woven with a network of intellectual, mythological, and ceremonial knowledge. 
      •  Many of these books are influenced by Tantra, and many of them include useful Yoga knowledge. 

       





      8. The Age of Sectarianism (1300-1 700 C E). 




      The Tantric rediscovery of the feminine principle in philosophy and yoga practice paved the way for the bhakti movement, the next phase in India's cultural history. 


      • This religious devotionalism movement was the climax of the major sectarian groups' monotheistic ambitions, particularly the Vaishnavas and Shaivas; thus the name Sectarian Age. 
      •  The devotional movement, or bhakti-marga, completed the pan-Indian synthesis that had begun during the Pre-Classical/Epic Age by include the emotional component in the psychological/spiritual process. 

        





      9. The Modern Era ( 1700-Present). 

       


      The syncretistic bhakti movement was followed by the Mughal empire's fall in the first part of the nineteenth century and the increasing political presence of European countries in India, culminating in Queen Victoria's assumption of the title Empress of India in 1880. 

      •  The Queen was enthralled by Hindu mysticism and invited yogins and other spiritual leaders to her court. 


      Since the establishment of the East India Company in London in 1 600 and the Dutch East India Company two years later, Western secular imperialism has had an increasing effect on India's age-old religious traditions. 

      •  This has resulted in a progressive weakening of the native Scandinavian value system via the adoption of a Western-style (science-oriented and basically materialist) education coupled with new technology. 

       

      The following comment by Carl Gustav Jung comes to mind in this regard: 


      • The European conquest of the East was a massive act of aggression, and it has left us with the responsibility—noblesse oblige—of comprehending the Eastern mentality. 
      •  This is perhaps more important than we know right now. 
      •  However, India's creative brilliance has not been unaffected by these changes



      There has been a potential spiritual revival, which has, among other things, generated a missionary feeling among Hindus for the first time in history: 


      • There has been a continuous flow of Hindu knowledge, particularly Yoga and Vedanta, to the Euro-American nations since the imposing figure of Swami Vivekananda appeared at the Parliament of Religions in Chicago in 1893. 
      •  We have never yet struck upon the idea that while we are conquering the Orient from outside, it may be fastening its grip on us from inside, as Jung noted with remarkable perceptiveness. 



      Much more might be written about the modern resurgence of Hindu tradition and its influence on the West. 


      •  The dates provided are variable, and the above effort at periodization is just an estimate. 
      •  Until the nineteenth century, India's chronology is famously speculative. 


      Hindu historiographers have a habit of mixing historical truth with mythology, symbolism, and ideology without regard for the accuracy of dates. 


      • Hindu consciousness and culture have long been praised for their "timelessness" by Western academics. 
      •  This belief, however, has proved to be a major blind spot, since it has prevented thorough examination of the historical material found in the Hindu texts, particularly the 6 Puranas. 


      A helpful difference may be established between the fundamental orientations of asceticism (tapas), renunciation (samnyasa), and mysticism (yoga) in the widest sense of the word, in addition to the split into religio-spiritual traditions and historical eras.  These are common to all of India's religious and philosophical traditions. 

       

      You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

      Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.




      YOGIC DRISHTIS



      The meditation gazing points to reflect on when practicing the poses are called drishtis. They're made to help with good alignment and to help you stay focused on the current moment. 

      We have a tendency to look about, equate ourselves to those in the room, or glance at the clock when exercising. Which diverts attention away from the practice's internal workings. Drishtis are intended to assist you in looking inside.


      The following are the 9 Yogic Drishtis:

      • 1. Nasagrai (also spelled Nasagre) (nose)
      • 2. Ajna Chakra or Bhrumadhye (third eye, between the eyebrows)
      • 3. Nabi Chakra, also known as Nabhi, Nabhicakre, or Nabi Chakra (belly button)
      • 4. Hastagrai or Hastagre are two different words for the same thing (hands)
      • 5. Padayoragrai (toes/feet) or Padayoragre (feet)
      • 6. Drishti of Parshva (to the right)
      • 7. Drishti of Parshva (to the left)
      • 8. Angushtamadhye or Angushta Ma Dyai. Angush (thumbs)
      • 9. Antara Drishti or Urdhva (up to the sky)

      Drishtis can be difficult to understand at first. There are, however, certain basic rules for gaze. It all boils down to following the stretch's course with your eyes. 

      In backbends, for example, we look at our third eye to allow the head to roll back and expand the backbend. 

      To lengthen the spine, we look at the toes in seated forward bends like Paschimottanasana (Western Intense Stretch Pose). 

      Drishtis are a way to gently concentrate without constantly staring; they are not meant to make you cross-eyed.










      Cosmic Consciousness by Kundalini Yoga



      The holy Himalaya, from wherest daughter Ganges has its source, in the mountains where Shiva Mahadeva, the snowy king was born. The peaks rising high above humanity are his Earthly abode, and the place his wife, Parvati, considers Her home. 

      The holiest spot (kshetra), the Pilgrims have traveled there since the beginning of time to meet and circumambulate (parikrama) Mount Kailasha (Kang Rinpoche), where Lord Shiva lives. The holy Mansarovar Lake is to the north-west of this noble mountain (Mapham Yum-tso). Shiva's paradise has been characterized as a land "resplendent with females, with lasting fragrances of all season's flowers, fanned by cool breezes, shadowed by the still shade of stately trees,... where troops of apsaras sing with madden passion."  

      It is said that whoever contemplates Shiva's abode in the Himalaya is better than whoever worships Shiva in Kashi. This is the pilgrimage's destination, as well as the scene and location of the discovery of several holy scriptures known as Tantras, in which Parvati normally asks Shiva questions regarding the purpose and road to salvation.

      However, there are various types of divine force and directions to sacred action and revelation in Hindu thought. As a result, the Tantric revelation holds that paying obeisance to Shiva and his consort does not require a trip to the actual peaks of the Himalaya or to Kailasha. All Tantras, whether Shaiva or Shakta, insist that a trip to Mount Kailasha is unnecessary, if not useless, since his mystic and symbolic abode is to be found in the thousand-petalled lotus, the Sahasrara-chakra, in the seeker's subtle or divine form. This abode is known as the shivasthana, the location where Shiva resides eternally and where all Yoga and meditation seekers are welcomed.

      Tantra practitioners take a daily path as part of their devotion. An inner journey into the still-yet-vibrating center of cosmic consciousness in the subtle body is imperative and mandatory for the Tantric path seeker, even though an external journey to a pilgrimage center is taken. Although all schools of Indie religion talk of the divinity of the body, the Tantras articulate it in its most complete and structured form. A devotee who abandons the divinity that resides inside his body to worship that which resides beyond his body is likened to a person who abandons his home's riches and wanders as a beggar asking for alms.



      The Cosmos of the Body




      Immutability is a Hindu concept, whereas the celestial divine body is a Buddhist concept. Tantras have a physical form. They thought they were wonderful and had attained enlightenment. They say there is a "etheric double" in addition to the gross or material body, which is subject to degradation and death. The subtle body (sukshama-sharira), also known as a sacred body (divya-deha), or a pure body (siddha-deha), is unveiled, tamed, energised, and sublimated during an arduous Tantra-yoga process for the attainment of consciousness unity. The subtle body is free of defilement and exists independently of the cosmos' spatio-temporal matrix. The pure category of the universe is inextricably bound to this subtle entity. It is associated with the union of the male and female principles, Shiva and Shakti, and serves as a purified dynamic powerhouse for the evolution of the universe across ever subtler planes of universal consciousness. According to the Tantras, awakening the sacred potency of the subtle body does not simply result in the possession of spiritual strength (siddhi). It has the ability to change the body's very substance over time.

      Human ascension to a superconscious state of consciousness, according to the Tantras, entails embodying the whole universe. A state of enlightenment, a shift in influence from the human world to the realm of cosmic consciousness. The body is seen as condensing the whole universe through this comocization. The citadel of the heart has been thought to be the sacred center among us since ancient times. The Chandogya Upanisad is where the concept of divinity-in-the-heart first appeared (VII, 1,1-3)


      The heart is located within the city of Brahman, which is the flesh, and within the heart is a small dwelling. This house is shaped like a lotus, and it contains all that should be searched for, enquired about, and realized.

      So, what is this lotus of the heart that resides within this house?

      The cosmos within the lotus of the heart is as vast as the universe beyond. Heaven and earth, the sun, the moon, lightning, and all the stars are all included within it. Anything that exists in the macrocosm exists in this microcosm.

      The lotus of the heart does not age, despite the fact that the body does. It does not perish as the body perishes. The true city of Brahman is the lotus of the heart, where Brahman resides in all his glory, not the body. 

      The heart of the Supreme Principle, symbolized by the lotus, is the true city of the Supreme Principle, untainted by the mundane realities of everyday life. Later on, this idea was massively extended and developed.

      Tantras and medieval Yoga-Upanisads include a formal paradigm of the microcosm, with lotuses serving as psychic centers of consciousness and self-realization. The micro-macro hypothesis of body universe is the scientific term for this. The divine or subtle body may be visualized in a variety of ways. The holy geography of India's terrain inspired one of the most convincing pictures to explain the correspondence and equivalence between the macrocosm and the microcosm. The Shiva Samhita paints a vivid picture of the divine self's sacred geography, in which the body reflects the sacred land's landscape:

      Mount Meru is encircled by the seven continents in your body; rivers, seas, mountains, plains, and gods of the fields are also present. It contains priests, nuns, pilgrimage sites, and the deities that preside over them.

      There are stars, planets, and the sun and moon; there are also the two celestial forces; that which kills, and that which creates; and all of the elements; ether, air, and fire, water, and earth. Yes, all that exists in the three realms is contained within your body.


      All of the Yogis are doing their specified tasks around Mount Meru, but only the one who understands this is considered a real Yogi. In a related vein, the Shaktananda Tarangini (Chapter l,39ff) depicts the nine planets, twelve zodiac signs, fourteen cosmos planes, seven mountains, seven oceans, and seven islands circling Mount Meru, the Universe's central axis, as forming the framework of the body cosmos. There is a subtle body or celestial body within this outer shell that represents all the stars, planets, astral planes, and elements like a mirror reflects the natural universe. Whatever powers rule the external universe, the inner cosmos is governed by the same rules.

      These are basically poetic representations of God's flesh. The Tantras vividly depict alternative maps of the subtle body that embodies the universe. According to the Tantrikas, we do not perceive our mind as anything apart from our body, like an outer garment, since it corresponds to and is the most personal extension of the Universe. 6 Since the subtle body is regarded as a miniature universe, its arrangement presupposes an inextricable connection with Tantra's ontology and worldview.

      The Supreme Truth, according to Tantric philosophy, is self-luminous— pure consciousness, absolute, and all-pervasive. In its descent to manifestation, this consciousness polarizes as fire. In a religious level, Shiva, the static male principle, represents this consciousness. Shakti, his power, is associated with the feminine principle.

      Shiva and Shakti are also at the heart of life. Shakti is a complex and active form of consciousness. During evolution, the Shakti philosophy completes itself and produces the realm of materiality, which is manifested in a variety of universe categories, including cognitive faculties, senses, their things, and the five elements. The map of the delicate body represents both of these types. Any form in the universe is a manifestation of consciousness (ctl).

      The person loses sight of the unity of cosmic consciousness and lives with a false sense of self as a result of the veiling of shakti. Devi Kundalini, or the Coiled One, is the Shakti philosophy of the universe in the delicate body, conceived as an eternal pool of electricity (Shakti). Kundalini is depicted as a sleeping snake in her unmanifest, latent form. Muladhara, the 'root reinforcement' chakra, is found between the anus and the genitals, and is coiled in three-and-a-half circles along the central axis at the base of the spine. The act of resting

      Kundalini Shakti is as subtle as a perfect lotus-stalk fibre and as vivid as a bolt of lightning. The microcosm is akin to an electric battery in which this cosmic force is stored in a dormant state. When this force is not channeled in a systematic manner, it either withers away or manifests in a small way.

      Kundalini is the spirit that lies at the heart of all life in its broadest sense. It is the source of all forces, qualities, and life forms that this world will take. The energy in the gross form of a normal human is inert, since it does not vibrate or revolve. That it "knots" together our differentiated and dualising mind, which empowers us with a distorted sense of egohood, it lays inert in tangles. These knots are shown in three planes around the body's central axis. They are the results of our previous deeds (samskaras), dooming us to a life of deception.

      They block Kundalini Shakti's complete and unrestricted movement. The ultimate aim of the cosmic awareness inner quest is to rediscover one's veiled cosmic existence. To get the goddess Kundalini up to the highest level of consciousness. This is thought to be the home of the para-bindu, the ultimate locus of the universe's seed.


      Kundalini Shakti is as subtle as a perfect lotus-stalk fibre and as vivid as a bolt of lightning. The microcosm is akin to an electric battery in which this cosmic force is stored in a dormant state. When this force is not channeled in a systematic manner, it either withers away or manifests in a small way.

      Kundalini is the spirit that lies at the heart of all life in its broadest sense. It is the source of all forces, qualities, and life forms that this world will take.

      The energy in the gross form of a normal human is inert, since it does not vibrate or revolve. That it "knots" together our differentiated and dualising mind, which empowers us with a distorted sense of egohood, it lays inert in tangles. These knots are shown in three planes around the body's central axis. They are the results of our previous deeds (samskaras), dooming us to a life of deception.

      They block Kundalini Shakti's complete and unrestricted movement. The ultimate aim of the cosmic awareness inner quest is to rediscover one's veiled cosmic existence. To get the goddess Kundalini up to the highest level of consciousness. This is thought to be the home of the para-bindu, the ultimate locus of the universe's seed.

      Kundalini, in a microcosmic context, is the root of the two most vital currents that control life. The first is Prana, or essential energy, which is present in all of us as air, life, or a source of energy.

      The second is virya or ojas1, a virile vitality that encourages all forms of artistic expression and mystic unfoldment. The awakened Kundalini is felt as a current, kinetic, and effulgent rising up the subtle channel, the Sushumna-nadi, at the crown of the head, the abode of Shiva, the Absolute as Pure Consciousness, in its manifest state (rif).

      Shiva and Shakti are thus found at diametrically opposed points that are linked by the body-cosmos' central axis.

      Numerous etheric pathways and vortices make up the subtle body (chakras). While the details of their arrangement and symbolism may differ from one school to the next, there is a universal model. 8 In the microcosm, there are three key subtle pathways. The most notable, the Sushumna-nadi, the body-cosmos' central axis, is flanked on the right by a lunar line, Ida, which represents the female principle, and on the left by the solar channel, Pingala, which represents the male principle. From the base of the spine, two waves of energy flow from Ida and Pingala, spiraling in opposing directions around the Sushumna, which reaches them between the eyebrows. They then split up into two groups.


      Both the left and right nostrils are involved. Yoga entails bringing these two slight currents together in the Sushumna, the median tube.

      The subtle body simply maps one's divine path from the stage of material life to the final state of beatitude.





      Each of the psychic vortices refers to one of the stages of this yogic path. The microcosm's inner map is made up of seven psychic vortices depicted as circuits (chakras) or lotuses. They are spaced around the Sushumna, the subtle body's vertical axis, which corresponds to the spinal column's line from the base to the crown of the head. In Kundalini yoga, the seven main points of influence in the subtle body (according to Hindu tradition) serve as yantras for inner meditative experience. Geometrical figures, such as wheels (chakras) or lotuses, are used to represent them. They are arranged on the Sushumna, the subtle body's vertical axis, which approximately corresponds to the spinal column and cortex. Each chakra is identified with a sound sensation, aspect, color, deity, animal image, and category of the universe, since these chakras encompass the whole psycho-cosmos.

      The Muladhara (root) Chakra is located at the base of the spine and is the first chakra. It serves as a focal point for the psychic body's powers. A square with an inverted triangle is one of its symbols. The snake-symbol of the latent microcosmic form of energy, Devi Kundalini, is coiled around a linga icon in the center of this yantra. It is governed by the element earth, and its seed motto is Lam.

      Svadishthana Chakra is located behind the genitals. It's a vermilion color. It takes the shape of a circle with six petals and a white crescent moon in the middle. The mantra of the water factor Vam is inscribed in the middle.

      The navel center, Manipura Chakra, is ruled by the element fire. It is pictured as a ten-petal lotus. A red triangle with three swastika symbols appears inside the lotus (T-shaped). Am is the seed mantra.

      The fourth, Anahata Chakra, is found in the heart level and is shaped like a lotus with twelve petals and a hexagon in the middle. The Anahata Chakra is the seat of the air elements, and it is a key revealer of celestial sound in meditation. Yam is the seed mantra.

      The Vishuddhi Chakra is located at the level of the throat and is the fifth chakra. It has a smoky purple color to it. A sixteen-petaled lotus with a downward-pointing triangle is the symbol. The symbol of the ether element, represented by a circle, is in the middle. Ham is the seed mantra.

      Ajna, the sixth chakra, is situated between the brows and is in charge of different stages of meditation. A shell with two petals and an inverted triangle bearing a linga emblem is the symbol. Om, the primordial vibration, is the seed mantra.

      The pinnacle of yogic practice, the seat of the Absolute, is represented by the seventh chakra, Sahasrara Chakra (Shiva-Shakti). Four fingers' width above the top of the head is how it's visualized. It is symbolized by a thousand-petalled inverted lotus, which symbolically rains divine radiance on the subtle body. The Sahasrara is colorless since it neutralizes all colors and sounds.

      There are 50 lotus petals from the root center to the center of the brows, corresponding to the letters of the alphabet (matrika) inscribed on the petals. These are the divisions that make up the universe and reflect Vaikhari vak's gross state. Each chakra has its own distinct image, which is associated with a god, animal symbol, mantra, color, rank, and universe plane (see Figure 1). This intricate symbolism depicts the Goddess Kundalini as the microcosm and forms the inner map of the body universe. 9

      The five psychic sheaths of the human body are all attached to these chakras: the Muladhara, Svadhishthana, and Manipura are associated with the visible or corporeal sheath, the Annamaya-kosha. The Pranamaya-kosha, or essential energy sheath, is connected to the Anahata and Vishuddhi-chakras, which manifest in air and ether. The Ajna-chakra represents the third sheath, Manomaya, the emotional sheath, and Vijnanamaya, the intelligence sheath. Finally, the Anandamaya kosa, or happiness body, is connected to pure consciousness, which is housed in the Sahasrara-chakra.

      Awareness and meditation (jnanadhyanaprakasah) expose these internal chakras, which mark the stages of the Kundalini Shakti's spiritual journey. They embody the seven ascension planes and provide the internal structure by which the adorer works out his universe unification. The subtle body scheme also acts as a framework for reciprocal correspondences between the body universes' internal layers and the cosmos' exterior planes.


      In the Subtle Body, the Path and Goal of Cosmic Consciousness



      Internal waystation markers and mirrored yogic mark symbolically unique journey phases as subtle-channels in the to evolution wholeness and lotus of consciousness. The body currents of crucial breath serve as the vehicle for the yogic journey. They quickly pass through the Ida, Pingala, and Sushumna delicate pathways of the body universe to join with Shiva at the crown of the head.

      These psychic sources have been likened to the Ganga, Yamuna, and Sarasvati rivers. And their meeting (triveni) in Prayag, Uttar Pradesh, is symbolically depicted in the Ajna Chakra, in the center between the eye brows, to signify that the worshipper's delicate body contains the greatest holy center. The Ajna Chakra is where certain yoga schools start the meditative path. They conclude that the adept must purify his cognitions and the dross of the dualising mind at the confluence of the three channels before beginning the awakening of the energy. It is the confluence of the three holy rivers, symbolically, and it is here that the original purification takes place before the journey.

      In the same way as a pilgrim is guided by the holy scenery, an inward psychic path is guided by the psychic centers symbolized by the lotuses.

      The Kundalini Shakti ascends like a blazing snake on her way, bursting through vortices and untying psychic blockages that lie in the direction of the Sushumna, the subtle body's central axis. Ascension (aroha) and regression (pranayama) are the two distinct stages of the yogic path (avaroha).

      "She shines brightly in her ascent; she looks like nectar in her descent," the Devigita (Chapt 10.3) says. First and foremost, the yogi, when roused by contemplative methods, leads the cosmic force.

      In the shape of a tapering blaze of light, this force rests in the breath alongside the true self (jivatma). It is brought to the root-centre at the base of the spine by the Yogi. The inner quest then continues. The five gross elements of earth, water, fire, air, and ether, as well as their respective cognition organs, are found in the five psychic centers, starting with Muladhara (=earth element), Svadhisthana (=water element), Manipura (=fire element), Anahata (=air element), and Vishuddhi (=ether element). Symbols of god and action.

      The sense of smell and the theory of smell (tanmatra) are related to the earth factor at the base of the spine, as well as the feet as the motion organ. Similarly, other chakras have specific associations.

      The Kundalini Shakti ascends like a blazing snake on her way, bursting through vortices and untying psychic blockages that lie in the direction of the Sushumna, the subtle body's central axis. Ascension (aroha) and regression (pranayama) are the two distinct stages of the yogic path (avaroha).

      "She shines brightly in her ascent; she looks like nectar in her descent," the Devigita (Chapt 10.3) says. First and foremost, the yogi, when roused by contemplative methods, leads the cosmic force.

      In the shape of a tapering blaze of light, this force rests in the breath alongside the true self (jivatma). It is brought to the root-centre at the base of the spine by the Yogi. The inner quest then continues. The five gross elements of earth, water, fire, air, and ether, as well as their respective cognition organs, are found in the five psychic centres, starting with Muladhara (=earth element), Svadhisthana (=water element), Manipura (=fire element), Anahata (=air element), and Vishuddhi (=ether element). Symbols of god and action.

      The sense of smell and the theory of smell (tanmatra) are related to the earth factor at the base of the spine, as well as the feet as the motion organ. Other chakras, too, have specific associations with elements and celestial categories (see figure 1.) They make up the twenty-five categories of formation when taken together (tattvasrishti).

      The celestial energy's primary goal in the body is to remove and consume (layakrama) all five elements, their properties, and the associated consciousness and action organs at each psychic base.

      The method of dissolving these elements into pure celestial awareness starts with each of the five elements consuming and dissolving into the next in their respective psychic centres, together with their mantras, deity reflection, and animal icons. Thus, at the Muladhara Chakra, the earth-element is incorporated into the subtle concept of scent (gandha-tanmatra), contemplating the diety with his animal symbol. The world is melted into water in the next step when meditating on Vishnu and his consort; the subtle concept of scent can be transformed into taste. The true self (jivatma), Kundalini Shakti, and the water aspect should then flow into the navel center's fire field. The yogi should think of Rudra and his Shakti, as well as the lustrous sense of vision, and absorb all of this, as well as the principle of taste (rasa-tattva), into the principle of sight/form (rupa-tattva). The yogi can then move on into the area of air at the centre of the throat. He meditates here on Isha, the air divinity and his Shakti, and absorbs the principle of seeing into the principle of touch (sparsha). And, while discussing Shiva and his consort, he meditates on the area of ether, where he absorbs the previous principle of touch into the principle of expression (vak) and the sense of hearing. The theory of expression (shabda-tattva) is then absorbed into egosense (ahamkara), egosense into mind (mahat-tattva), and mind into subtle Prakriti at the Ajna Chakra. And Prakriti into the ultimate bindu, which represents the Shiva philosophy, residing in Shiva's abode, the thousand-petalled lotus. 10

      Spiritual enlightenment is commonly thought of as a journey from the gross to the subtle, but this movement is just half of the journey's total cycle. The descent of the subtle knowledge of cosmic consciousness is the other part of the inner path. The nectarine bliss of harmony at the Shivasthana, in the highest chakra, is visualised as a spray of nectar flowing down to the lower chakras from the cold rays of the moon of consciousness (citcandrika). The cyclic transition from the essence of consciousness to the mind and intellect, to the sensory organs, the earth aspect, and finally to the outside world of the senses comes to an end here.

      The twin poles through which the whole period of involution and evolution of celestial energy takes place are the earth sphere, the lowest concept in the order of creation and the highest pinnacle of cosmic consciousness. The climb is called samhara-krama, and it is the first half of the path to completeness.

      The Kundalini Shakti is taken back to its original resting ground at the base of the spine on the reverse journey. In the course of her descent, the current divine body is recreated.

      With ambrosial nectar extracted from Shiva and Shakti's union, the energy now reverses her movement and empowers the vortices that lie in her way. This energy must be returned in the same way that she was directed upwards. She returns with a trickle of nectar that she sprinkles on each of the chakras. In other words, she infuses and inundates each psychic vortex with rasa, bursting with Shiva and Shakti's ultimate bliss of unification of consciousness. This union resurrects them and sets the stage for the flood of nectar that results from their joy. The Kundalini Shakti is referred to as the "universal vessel bearing the stream of celestial nectar (brahmandabhanda)" in this act.

      In strictly psychic terminology, the journey can be translated as the unfolding of consciousness from its incipient state to the outpetalling of the soul flower. C.J. Jung has beautifully represented a visual philosophy of consciousness through the animal symbols of the psychic vortices through his long years of study into the mechanisms of the psyche. These are sometimes defined as "vehicles of consciousness."



      Symbols of Animals



      The fundamental elephant force that drives our atus facilitates the reconstruction of root consciousness, our chakra, aware of the Muladhara, which represents the cosmos. The earth aspect represents the earth's sustaining powers.

      Kundalini energy ascends to the plane of Svadhisthana Chakra, where it meets the Makara, or Leviathan, propelled by the energy of the root support. If the elephant is the driving force, the Leviathan is the "engine that keeps you alive in the conscious world," according to Jung.

      Waters, too, are essential for life to exist. Yet, as Jung points out, there is a power it obstructs that for what it is: "the greatest blessing in the waking world is the greatest curse in the unconscious." As a result, the Makara is optimistic, almost like a "dragon that devours." The aquatic energy of Makara turns into a Ram, the holy beast of Agni, or God of fire, in the next chakra, the Manipura Chakra. Ram is associated with Mars, the fiery world, which "represents impulses, impulsiveness, rashness, aggression, and all such things." It symbolises the ultimate act of love. To become mindful of one's passion on a subconscious basis is to seek its sublimation. The robust Ram is replaced in the next Anahata Chakra by a light-footed gazelle, which is also a sacrificial cow. The gazelle is portrayed as a majestic animal that is elusive, quick on its feet, light as air, and "gravity defying," rising high and resembling an eagle. From the Manipura to the Anahata, one experiences "the crossing over" to the sphere of self-recognition, a sign of "lightness of mind and emotion," the ego on its ascent. Here, one travels onto a plane where one recognises one's cosmic ability, leaving behind the mundane social and egoistic personality. This crossing over is very difficult to accept because it entails giving up one's self to the "consciousness that is at the limit." The elephant's symbol reappears in the Vishuddhi Chakra as the milky white Airavata, Indra's bearer. According to Jung, the elephant undergoes a transition, which initially took us closer to our psychic unfoldment. The elephant's blackness has transubstantiated into the purity of white, and the element earth has become ether, the psyche's explosive material. There is no animal sign at the Ajna Chakra. Instead, the chakra's corolla resembles a "winged seed," a full blinding white light perfectly aware of its celestial dimensions. The Sahasrara Chakra, the final summit, is an etheric void that is symbolless since it is "one" with cosmic consciousness.


      When the channel awakens and harmonises, she pierces the twin forces. Sheasunders purifies and empowers the six Kundalini chakras by increasing the knots chakras, sharpening and empowering them with divine strength. When the Kundalini cleanses the Muladhara-chakra, which is aligned with the earth philosophy and springs from the delicate nature of smell, the aspirant is able to taste divine fragrances that are not available in everyday life. The Kundalini expands and saturates the entire body in the form of ultra-subtle pranic energy as the related centres awaken. The dreaming mind is fully overtaken by a vibratory stirring. Involuntary body motions, such as arm and leg trembling, may occur, and one may recoil into a waking state of trance sleep (yoganidra) or dive into a state of divine whirling ghurni, or be overcome by a torrent of compassion. One may adopt a variety of postures and movements on the spur of the moment (mudras and asanas). The unfolding of Kundalini Shakti is marked by many lakshanas13. Someone can be moved to write beautiful poems, sing devotional songs, or gain random awareness of some thing, person, or place. In this state, the adept loses awareness of his detachment from the celestial body, which is his own reflection, and breaks his earthly bonds in an instant.

      The false sense of identification with the body vanishes and the aspirant is free of dualising thinking until the two discordant currents of the lunar (Ida) and solar (Pingala) channels become firmly harmonised in the median channel, Sushumna. He then reaches a state of samadhi, or undifferentiated immersion, on his own. The condition is a striking characteristic of the Shaiva and Shakta traditions.



      Awakened Kundalini 


      When the channel awakens and harmonises, she pierces the twin forces. She asunders purifies the six Kundalini chakras, increasing the knots chakras, across and the median. She sharpens and instils supernatural influence in them. When the Kundalini cleanses the Muladhara-chakra, which is aligned with the earth philosophy and springs from the delicate nature of smell, the aspirant is able to taste divine fragrances that are not available in everyday life. The Kundalini expands and saturates the entire body in the form of ultra-subtle pranic energy as the related centres awaken. The dreaming mind is fully overtaken by a vibratory stirring. Involuntary body motions, such as arm and leg trembling, may occur, and one may recoil into a waking state of trance sleep (yoganidra) or dive into a state of divine whirling ghurni, or be overcome by a torrent of compassion. One may adopt a variety of postures and movements on the spur of the moment (mudras and asanas). The unfolding of Kundalini Shakti is marked by many lakshanas13. Someone can be moved to write beautiful poems, sing devotional songs, or gain random awareness of some thing, person, or place. In this state, the adept loses awareness of his detachment from the celestial body, which is his own reflection, and breaks his earthly bonds in an instant.

      The false sense of identification with the body vanishes and the aspirant is free of dualizing thinking until the two discordant currents of the lunar (Ida) and solar (Pingala) channels become firmly harmonised in the median channel, Sushumna. He then enters a state of samadhi, or undifferentiated absorption, on his own. The state of samadhi is viewed as a state of active consciousness, conscious and absolute, in which the immanent and transcendent are woven into a continuous spectrum in the Shaiva and Shakta traditions.

      The yogi is supposed to undergo both internal and external extension of consciousness. In the ascending and descent of the Kundalini Shakti, he internalizes the world in the subtle body in the first step. His beatific vision of oneness openly manifests in the external universe, mediated by the senses, in the next phase. Unmilana samadhi, or feeling the joy of consciousness with open eyes14, is the term for this. The blissful and holy body is where Shiva and Shakti's artistic union is felt. The planet is not negated or abolished; rather, every atom of the universe is infused with the all-pervasive force of blissful consciousness. The cosmic play of Kundalini Shakti is maintained by the exteriorization of the referential universe into harmony and the exteriorization of bliss into the outer world.



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      9. Khanna, Madhu. Yantra: The Tantric Symbol of Cosmic Unity. London: Thames

      and Hudson, 1997 (reprint), pp.121-122.

      10. Sritattvacintamani, Chap. VI, 53-54, pp. 224-227. The Serpent Power, pp. 446-47

      Op. cit.

      11. Sritattvacintamani Chap. VI, 54, p.226. Op.cit

      12. Jung, C.G., Psychological Commentary on Kundalini Yoga, Lectures One, Two,

      Three and Four, 1932 (from the Notes of Mary Foote), published in Spring, New

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      13. Nigamananda, Tantrikaguru (in Hindi). Halisar: Assam Bangiya Sarasvata Matha,

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      ergy. London: Thames and Hudson, 1982, p.71 ff, has documented the process

      and effects of the Kundalini experience.

      14. Pratyabhijnahrdayam, The Secret of Self-Recognition. Text with English transla

      tion and notes by Jaidev Singh. Delhi: Motilal Banarasidass, 1963, p 103 ff; c.f.,

      Siva Sutras, sutra 45, pp 231-232. Op.cit.