Showing posts with label antyeshthi samskara. Show all posts
Showing posts with label antyeshthi samskara. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is The Viramitrodaya?

 



One of the most recent and largest nibandhas ("collections"), compiled by scholar Mitra Mishra in the early seventeenth century.


The nibandhas were Hindu lore compendia in which the compilers culled references on a specific theme from the Vedas, dharma literature, puranas, and other authoritative religious texts, and then compiled them into a single volume.

The Viramitrodaya is a massive compendium of Hindu lore, divided into twenty-two sections, each of which focuses on a different aspect of Hindu life, such as daily practice, worship, gift-giving (dana), vows, pilgrimage, penances (prayashchitta), purification, death rites (antyeshthi samskara), law, and so on, culminating in liberation (moksha).


Mitra Mishra's work became an important source for later legal interpretation, particularly in eastern India, because he not only cites relevant scriptural passages but also provides extensive learned commentary.


~Kiran Atma


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Hinduism - Who Was Mitra Mishra?

 


Mitra Mishra (early 17th c.) is the author of the Viramitrodaya, a compendium of Hindu lore.

The Viramitrodaya is an example of a class of commentarial literature known as nibandhas (“collections”).

The compilers of the nibandhas culled references on a particular theme from the Vedas, dharma literature, puranas, and other authoritative religious texts, placing these excerpts into a single volume.

Each of the Viramitrodaya’s twenty-two sections is devoted to a particular aspect of Hindu life, such as daily practice, worship, gift-giving (dana), vows, pilgrimage, penances (prayashchitta), purification, death rites (antyeshthi samskara), and law; the final section is devoted to final liberation of the soul (moksha) (moksha).

In addition to citing the relevant scriptural passages, Mitra Mishra also provides extensive commentary of his own.

His work became an important source for later legal interpretation, particularly in eastern India.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - What Is Maranashaucha?


Maranashaucha is a term used to describe death-induced ritual impurity (ashaucha) (marana).

Hair, spittle, pus, blood, and other biological effluvia are all considered causes of impurity, but a corpse is the most unclean of them.

Any death triggers the most virulent impurity, which affects the whole family.

This irrationality must be carefully restrained and managed via the funeral ceremonies for the sake of the family's safety (antyeshthi samskara).

The substantial ceremonial difference between birth and death may be seen here.

Although birth introduces impurity (sutakashaucha) to the family due to the body products associated with it, this impurity is seen as less violent since the birth of a child is an auspicious and life-affirming occurrence.

Death, on the other hand, is said to bring ill luck, so the family must not only deal with the impurity, but also with the inauspiciousness brought on by the death.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.