Showing posts with label five Elements. Show all posts
Showing posts with label five Elements. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is Vayu Or Wind Among The Five Elements In Hinduism?

 


Vayu Or Wind is one of the five elements in Indian cosmology, along with earth, fire, water, and akasha.

Each of the elements is related with one of the five senses in certain philosophical traditions; here, wind is associated with touch.

Inside the body, the numerous "vital winds" (prana) are linked to a variety of biological activities, including respiration and circulation.


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Hinduism - Among The Five Elements Or Panchabhuta, What Is Water Or Jal Associated?

 

 


Water is one of the five elements in Indian cosmology, along with earth, fire, wind, and akasha.

Each of the elements is related with one of the senses in certain philosophical traditions; here, water is associated with taste.

Water is also linked to a number of biological activities, including reproduction (which involves the mixing of fluids) and the disposal of fluid wastes.


Kiran Atma


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Hinduism - What Is The Ritual Significance Of Fire To The Hindus?


Earth, wind, water, and akasha are the other four elements in ancient Indian cosmology, and fire is one of them. 

Each of the elements is associated with one of the five senses in certain philosophical traditions. 

Because the eye's function in apprehending a visual item is likened to a flame darting out and burning something, fire is connected with sight. 

Fire is also related with digestion in the body, which is often thought of as "cooking" the meals in the digestive tract. 



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Hinduism - What Are The Five Elements In Hindu Cosmology?

 

There are five primary elements in traditional Indian cosmology, four of which are identical to those found in medieval European conceptions: earth, fire, water, and wind (as moving air that is perceptible to human beings). 

The fifth element, akasha, has no obvious equivalent in European thought. 

It is often interpreted as "space," and it is thought to permeate the world around us, filling in the gaps. 

Each of these elements is related with a certain sense in Indian cosmology: earth with smell, fire with sight, water with taste, wind with touch, and akasha with hearing. 



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Hinduism - How Is The Earth Revered In Hinduism?


Earth is regarded as a deity in Hindu mythology. 

One of the most deeply ingrained components of Hindu culture is the belief that India is a holy territory, and many of India's mountains, rivers, and other physical features are regarded gods and goddesses. 

This faith extends to the planet itself. 

Earth is depicted as the goddess Prthivi in the Vedas, the earliest Hindu holy writings, who is praised for her fertility, nurturing ability, and firmness in maintaining all things. 

Prthivi is nearly invariably identified with Dyaus, a masculine deity associated with the sky whose name is a cognate version of Zeus in Greek mythology. 

The divine pair is thus formed, with the sky's rain feeding and revitalizing the land. 

In later mythology, the goddess Bhudevi ("Earth Goddess"), who is said to be one of the deity Vishnu's brides, takes the place of Prthivi. 

Bhudevi is less often associated with fertility and parenting; her major role is to serve as a supplicant for Vishnu's world-saving activities. 

Earth calls out to Vishnu for aid when the wicked grow oppressive or a demon gets too strong and disturbs the cosmic order, and Vishnu obligingly restores the cosmic equilibrium. 

The Boar avatar is an example of this, in which Vishnu frees Earth from her enslavement. 

See David R. Kinsley's Hindu Goddesses, 1986, for further details. 


The Earth is also one of the five elements in ancient Indian cosmology, the others being water, fire, wind, and akasha in their tangible form. 

Each of the elements is related with one of the five senses in certain philosophical traditions; in this example, earth is associated with scent. 

Earth is also linked to a number of body activities, including the disposal of solid wastes. 



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Five Elements of Shamanic Taoism



The five elements are five fundamental energy transitions that result from yin and yang interactions. The five tendencies of energy in motion are represented by the physical elements contained in nature (wood, fire, earth, metal, and water). 

  1. Wood is a symbol of growing and producing electricity. 
  2. Fire is a symbol of expanding and radiating light. 
  3. Earth is a symbol of centering and stabilizing powers.
  4. Metal reflects solidifying and contracting force. 
  5. Water is a type of energy that conserves, gathers, and sinks.

The seasons are linked to the five elements. 

  • The green flowering of new growth in plants and trees that bear fruit in the scorching heat of summer occurs in the spring. 
  • Before the grey autumn sets in, ripe yellow fields lie waiting to be harvested.
  • When the water turns to ice in the winter, life goes indoors to perish after conceiving anew for spring. Under Heaven, the seasons shift. 
  • The elements are the spirits of the seasons, which govern the human landscape as rain does the mundane world.

What does fire feel like? 

What exactly does it do? 

  • Fire warms and comforts, burns and kills, dances like flame, and is difficult to comprehend.
  • Earth, the planet is peaceful, well-balanced, and earthy! We don't hear it hurtling through the sun at thousands of miles per hour when we live with it.
  • Metal is strong, rough, and sharp, and it has the ability to cut, contain, mirror, and inspire. Warmth can also be used to melt and mold metal.



The elements of wood and metal are represented by these trees growing around rocks.

Water may be still or turbulent, aggressive or submissive. Water can transform into ice, steam, tears, or tidal waves in the blink of an eye.

Wood has a distinct emphasis and intent, competes for light, and expands in all directions.

Different facets of the elements have different effects on one another, some of which are nourishing and others which are controlling. 

The “Cycle of Support” describes their nourishing influences, while the “Lines of Control” describes their governing influences.


In a cycle of support, the elements nourish one another.

  1. The light, or fire, bestows blessings on the earth.
  2. Metal is formed deep within the planet.
  3. Water gushes out from the metal rock.
  4. Water nourishes plant life and timber.
  5. And fire is fueled by wood.

Too much heat can scorch the soil, causing the springs to dry up, or too little sun can leave crops unripe.


In the Lines of Control, elements regulate one another.

  1. Metal is melted by fire.
  2. Wood is harmed by metal.
  3. The world is gripped by wood.
  4. Water is guided by the Earth.
  5. Fire is regulated by water.

Metal often refuses to melt, either because it is too strong or because the flame is too weak; wood will blunt the axe; eroded soil is too rough or crumbling for roots to grip; flash floods smash the banks; and too much fire evaporates water.



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