Showing posts with label jnana. Show all posts
Showing posts with label jnana. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is Jnanakarmasamucchaya In Hindu Philosophy?


 ("consciousness and action in tandem") Members of the bhedabhada ("identity-in-difference") philosophical school encouraged religious discipline to eliminate the soul's bondage and rebirth (samsara).

Correct consciousness (jnana) and ritual activity (karma) were both crucial factors in achieving eventual soul liberation, according to this school.

The first phase was to lessen one's bad karmic dispositions, such as greed, wrath, and ignorance, by doing meritorious ritual deeds like as fasting (upavasa), devotion, and pilgrimage.

Meditation was used to totally eradicate these weaker dispositions.

Other philosophical schools, notably the Advaita Vedanta school, criticized the assumptions that underpin this path, claiming that ultimate liberation comes only through awareness. 


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Hinduism - What Is Jnana Mudra?

 


Jnana ("knowledge") is a Sanskrit word that means "knowledge." Jnana Mudra in Indian dance, sculpture, and ritual, a specific symbolic hand motion (mudra) is used.

The tips of the thumb and index finger contact in the jnana mudra, while the palm and hand are held across the heart area.

It is used to express a deep comprehension of the fundamental workings of the cosmos, as its name suggests.

 


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Hinduism - What Does Jnana Mean In Hindu Philosophy?

 

 A term that has distinct connotations in different settings in Indian philosophical philosophy.

The term jnana comes from the verb "to know," and one of its meanings is "consciousness," at least in a perceptual sense.

In a more abstract sense, it represents what it is to genuinely "know" something; the jnanamarga is one of the ways to soul liberation stated in the Bhagavad Gita, alongside the karmamarga and the bhaktimarga.

In this case, "wisdom" or "realization" could be a better translation, since this isn't the kind of "knowledge" that comes from reading a book or getting instruction, but rather from deep understanding achieved through considerable effort.


 


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INTELLECT - BRAHMA JNANA AND ABHYASA



The Yogis achieve the nectar of equality solely through Samadhi.

The lamp of wisdom does not appear without Yoga practice, just as the fire latent in the sacrificial wood does not appear without churning.

Outside, a vessel's fire does not provide light. When the hull is shattered, however, the light shines from the outside.

The vessel refers to one's physical form. The light or fire inside is the seat of "That." When the body is split by the teachings of a Guru, the light of Brahmajnana shines brightly.

With the Guru as the helmsman and through the affinities of Abhyasa, one passes the subtle body and the ocean of Samsara.


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