Showing posts with label mindfulness meditation. Show all posts
Showing posts with label mindfulness meditation. Show all posts

Mindfulness - Mindfulness As A Tool To Assist You



Do you ever get lost in thought? 


  • Your mind is free to think anything it wants for the most of the day while you go about your regular tasks. 
  • You're in 'automatic pilot' mode. 


However, some of your automatic thoughts may be harmful to you, or you may be so engrossed in them that you don't see what's going on around you. 


  • For example, you go for a relaxing stroll in the park, but your mind is preoccupied with your next assignment. 
  • If your thoughts are unhelpful, you are first not really living in the present moment, and second, you are making yourself more worried, nervous, or sad. 
  • Mindfulness isn't about resolving issues. 

Acceptance comes first in mindfulness, and change may or may not follow. 


If you suffer from anxiety, mindfulness teaches you how to accept rather than reject or battle your worry, and transformation occurs spontaneously as a result of this approach. 


‘What we oppose endures,' as the old adage goes. 

‘What you accept transforms,' says mindfulness. 

 

This explains how mindfulness may benefit you in a variety of ways. 


  1. Creating A Healing Environment
  2. Being Able To Relax More 
  3. Increasing Efficiency
  4. Improving Wisdom And  Increasing Knowledge
  5. Finding Out Who You Are


Acceptance in mindfulness refers to acknowledging your present-moment experience.

 Acceptance is not the same as resignation or surrender.


You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation here.



Mindfulness - Finding Out Who You Are



Mindfulness may take you on a fascinating journey of self-discovery. 


  • The term person is derived from the Latin word persona, which originally meant a theater figure or a mask. 
  • The term "discovery" refers to the act of uncovering or uncovering something. 
  • In this way, personal discovery is about peeling back the layers of your mask. 

‘All the world is a theater, and all the men and women are just actors,' Shakespeare remarked. 


You learn to view your roles, personas, or masks as part of who you are as a result of mindfulness practice. 


  • You may continue to assist others, make money, or do anything you choose, but you recognize that this is just one way of looking at things, one dimension of your existence. 
  • You probably wear a variety of masks depending on the character you're playing. 
  • You may be a parent, a child, a spouse, or an employee. 
  • Each of these positions requires you to fulfill certain responsibilities. 
  • You may not realize that mindfulness practice can help you remove all of your masks. Mindfulness allows you to just be yourself. 
  • You may get distinct sensations of a sense of being while practicing mindfulness meditation. 
  • You may have a profound feeling of serenity, quiet, and calmness. 
  • Your physical body, which is typically substantial, fades into the background of your consciousness at times, and you feel connected to your surroundings. 


Some individuals get emotionally connected to these events and want to replicate them, as though they're getting closer to something. 

However, as time passes, you realize that even apparently joyful moments come and go. 

Take advantage of them while they're here, and then let them leave. 

You may come to realize that you're a witness to life's events if you practice mindfulness. 


In your mindfulness practice, thoughts, emotions, and physical sensations come and go, but a part of you is just watching it all - awareness itself. 

This is a pretty basic phenomenon that everyone can see and feel. 

Being genuinely oneself is so basic that it's easy to miss. 

As this witness, you are flawless, entire, and complete exactly as you are, according to Eastern philosophy. 

Because you connect with your ideas and feelings, which are always changing, you may not feel flawless. 

 

At the end of the day, you don't need to do anything to achieve this natural condition because you are it all the time - right now. 


Mindfulness is not about self-improvement for these reasons. You are perfect exactly the way you are at the heart of your existence! 

Mindfulness exercises and meditations are simply meant to assist in the training of your brain to become more focused and peaceful, as well as your heart to become more warm and open. 


Mindfulness isn't about altering yourself; it's about recognizing that you're wonderful in your own skin. 

‘What a freedom to understand that the “voice in my head” is not who I am,' says Eckhart Tolle, author of A New Earth: Create a Better Life. 

So, who am I? 'Whoever sees that.' You'll be less bothered by life's ups and downs once you realize you're the witness of all experience. 


This knowledge may help you live a happy life. It's a little bit simpler to go with the flow and look at life as an adventure rather than a series of difficulties when you go with the flow.


You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation here.



Mindfulness - Improving Wisdom And Increasing Knowledge



Wisdom is prized in both Eastern and Western cultures. 

Philosophy, according to Socrates and Plato, is literally the desire of wisdom (philo-sophia). 


  • Wisdom is your fundamental essence, according to Eastern traditions, and it leads to profound satisfaction for yourself as well as helping others discover pleasure inside themselves. 
  • You may get access to more knowledge. 
  • Because you learn to control your own thoughts and emotions, mindfulness leads to knowledge. 


You don't think a negative idea is real just because you have one. 


  • When you're dealing with difficult emotions like sorrow, worry, or irritation, you may use mindfulness to process them rather of allowing them to dominate you. 
  • You'll be able to listen closely to people and form satisfying, long-lasting connections as your emotional equilibrium improves. 
  • You can make better choices when your thinking is clear. 
  • You may be happy and healthier if you have an open heart. 
  • Because of your increased awareness, mindfulness leads to knowledge. 
  • You become more conscious of how you interact with yourself, others, and the environment. 
  • You'll be in a lot better position to make educated decisions with this increased awareness. 
  • You are consciously aware and take action based on contemplation and what is in the best interests of everyone, including yourself, rather than existing mechanically like a robot. 


The Dalai Lama is someone I admire for his wisdom. 


  • He's nice and sensitive, and he cares about other people's well-being. 
  • He aspires to make the world a better place by reducing pain and increasing pleasure. 
  • He's not egotistical, he smiles a lot, and he doesn't appear overburdened by his responsibilities or the tremendous losses he's suffered. 
  • People seem to relish the opportunity to spend time with him. 
  • He seems to live in a thoughtful manner. 

Regard the individuals you consider to be smart. 

What distinguishes them? 

I'm guessing you find them attentive and cognizant of their activities, rather than repetitive and buried in their own thoughts.


You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation here.



Mindfulness - Increasing Efficiency



When it comes to being attentive, it's best to focus on one item at a time. 


  • When you walk, you just walk. 
  • You simply listen while you're listening. 
  • You simply write while you're writing. 
  • By practicing formal and casual mindfulness meditation you're educating your brain with mindful attitudes like,
      • Compassion,
      • Curiosity, 
      • Acknowledgment  
  • So, if you're writing a report, you concentrate as much as possible on that task without overworking yourself. 

Each time your mind wanders to another idea, you note what you were thinking about (curiosity), and then gently direct your focus back to the writing (remember, you're being nice to yourself). 


As a result, you complete your report faster (with less time spent thinking about other things), and the work is likely to be of higher quality (because you gave the report your full attention). 


The more you can concentrate on what you're doing, the more you'll be able to accomplish. 

  • Wow, mindfulness can help you work more efficiently! 
  • You can't just decide to concentrate on your job and then do so. 
  • The ability to pay attention isn't something you can decide on the spur of the moment. 
  • Attention may be honed in the same way that biceps can be honed at a gym. 

Mindfulness is a mental workout. 


You do not, however, need to exert as much effort as you would while exercising out. 

You must be gentle while teaching the mind to be alert, otherwise the mind will grow less attentive.


This is why mindfulness necessitates compassion. 

  • Your mind will revolt if you are too severe with yourself. 
  • You'll also observe where energy is being squandered if you're aware. 

You can become conscious of negative thoughts and learn to stop them if you have a tendency of worrying or thinking negatively. 


  • The most common reason of absence is stress (not turning up to work). 
  • Because you're more likely to remain healthy and be able to work in the first place, mindfulness is one method to manage your stress levels and therefore increase productivity. (Perhaps it isn't such a good thing!) 


When you're attentive, your job becomes more pleasant, and when you're enjoying something, you're more creative and productive. 


  • You can be interested about whatever you do if you educate your mind to be curious about experience rather than bored. 
  • After a while, you'll realize that work flows through you rather than through you performing the job. 
  • You're either feeding the kids or giving that presentation. 
  • You feel more comfortable and at peace as you lose the sensation of ‘me' doing this. 
  • When this occurs, work becomes easy, frequently of very high quality, and completely pleasant - which, don't you think, sounds like a wonderful sort of productivity?


You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation here.



Mindfulness - Being Able To Relax More



Being mindful may be a really soothing experience. 

You may begin to feel calmer when you learn to relax with awareness of your breathing or the noises around you. 


The goal of mindfulness, on the other hand, is not relaxation. 

One of the pleasant by-products is relaxation. 


  • Mindfulness is the practice of cultivating a feeling of compassion, curiosity, and acceptance toward one's inner and outside experiences, whatever they may be. 
  • When you practice mindfulness, you may or may not experience extremely profound levels of calm. 
  • If you don't, it doesn't necessarily imply you're not practicing mindfulness properly. 
  • All you need is a little perseverance. 


Why is it that the goal of mindfulness isn't relaxation? 


  • For the next several minutes, try to be completely calm. 
  • What if you're unable to unwind? If you want to relax, you'll either succeed or fail. 
  • If you feel like you're failing, you'll get more uptight and worried, which is the last thing you want. 
  • You can't fail at mindfulness since you don't have any prior experience to draw on. 
  • You just practice paying attention as best you can to whatever your experience is, and whatever occurs happens. 


As a result of your experience, you acquire a better knowledge. 

Mindfulness is a highly forgiving state of mind!


You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation here.



Mindfulness - Creating A Healing Environment



It may be a difficult moment when you are suffering from a physical ailment. 

It's possible that your illness is unpleasant or even life-threatening. 

Perhaps your disease has left you unable to do basic tasks that you once took for granted, such as running up the stairs or caring for yourself alone. 

Illness has the ability to shake you to your core. 


What are your options for dealing with this? 


How can you develop inner strength to cope with the changes that occur without being overwhelmed and giving up hope? 


  • High amounts of stress, especially over a lengthy period of time, have been proven to deplete the immune system's power. 
  • Perhaps you caught the illness after a stressful time. 
  • According to research, caregivers who are under a lot of stress for a long time have a poorer immune system when it comes to illnesses like the flu. 
  • Because mindfulness lowers stress, it is a useful tool for coping with sickness. 
  • Reduced stress improves the efficiency of your immune system, which may assist speed up the recovery process from an illness, particularly if the disease is stress-related.
  • Mindfulness may help you feel better by reducing stress, worry, pain, and sadness, as well as increasing your energy, creativity, relationship quality, and general feeling of well-being. 

The more mindfulness you practice, the better: 

Monks who have practiced mindfulness their whole lives have levels of happiness in their brains that are much above what science believed was possible.


You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation here.



Mindfulness - What Is Mindfulness Meditation?



Here's quick a look at Mindfulness Meditation:


  • Mindfulness meditation is a form of meditation that has undergone extensive study and testing in therapeutic settings. 
  • Meditation isn't about meditating on nothing. 
  • Meditation is devoting systematic attention to anything you want to concentrate on, which may involve being aware of your thoughts. 
  • You may uncover your thoughts' regular patterns by listening to them. 
  • Being more conscious of your thoughts is beneficial since they have a significant effect on your emotions and choices. 


During mindfulness meditation, you usually concentrate on one or more of the following: 


    1. The sensation of your own breathing 
    2. Any of your senses 
    3. Your body 
    4. Your thoughts 
    5. Your emotions 
    6. Whatever is now occupying your attention.


There are two kinds of mindfulness meditation: 


1. Formal meditation is a kind of meditation that takes place in a controlled environment. 


    • This is a kind of meditation in which you take time out of your day to practice meditation. 
    • Time out allows you to develop your mindfulness practice and get a better understanding of your mind, its habitual tendencies, and how to stay mindful for a long length of time while being compassionate and curious about yourself and your experience. 
    • Formal meditation is a kind of mental conditioning. 


2. Meditation in a non-formal setting. 


    • This is when you get into a concentrated and meditative state of mind while doing things like cooking, cleaning, going to work, chatting to a friend, driving, or anything else. 
    • Consider it regular attentiveness. 
    • As a result, you'll continue to improve your mindfulness skills and teach your mind to remain in the present moment rather than drifting off into the past or future. 
    • You may relax in a mindful awareness at any time of day, whatever you're doing, using informal mindfulness meditation. 

I don't mean a rehearsal when I say "practice" in the context of meditation. 

To practice meditation, it is to participate in the meditation exercise - not to practice in the sense of attempting to master it one day. 


You don't have to evaluate or improve your meditation in any way. 

Your experience is unique to you.


You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation here.



Mindfulness - What It Is And What It Isn't



Mindfulness is an old concept that may be found in both Eastern and Western cultures. 

The ancient Indian term Sati, which denotes awareness, attention, and remembering, is translated as mindfulness. 


1. Awareness. 

  • This is a feature of being human that allows you to be aware of your surroundings. Nothing would exist for you if you were not aware. 

2. Attention. 

  • Mindfulness training improves your capacity to shift and maintain your attention anywhere and however you choose. 

3. Remembering. 

  • Remembering to pay attention to your experience from moment to moment is an important component of mindfulness. 


It's easy to forget to be attentive. The words re'again' and memorari'be aware of' are derived from the Latin re'again' and memorari'be mindful of'. 


  • Let's say you want to learn to be more attentive to help you deal with stress. 
  • You start to feel anxious and nervous at work as you think about your upcoming presentation. 
  • You remember to concentrate your attentive attention on your own breathing rather than continuously fretting once you become aware of this. 
  • Slowly calming yourself down by feeling your breath with a sense of warmth and kindness. 

 ‘Mindfulness may be fostered by paying attention in a particular manner, that is, in the present moment, as non-reactively, non-judgmentally, and openheartedly as possible,' says Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn, who created mindfulness in a therapeutic context. 



You may deconstruct the meaning even more: 


    • I'm paying attention to what's going on. 
    • To be aware, you must pay attention to whatever it is that you choose to focus on. 
    • Now is the time. 

The truth of being in the here and now is that all you have to do is be aware of how things are right now. 

    • Your own experience is genuine and accurate in its whole. 
    • In a non-reactive manner. 
    • Normally, when you encounter something, you respond to it instinctively based on your previous training. 
    • If you think, "I still haven't completed my job," you will respond in some way with thoughts, words, and actions. 
    • Instead of reacting to ideas, mindfulness encourages you to respond to your experience. 

 

A reaction is uncontrollable and leaves you with no option; a response is intentional and deliberated action. 

    • In a nonjudgmental manner. 
    • It's easy to categorize experiences as positive or negative, as something you enjoy or hate. 
    • I want to be happy; I don't enjoy being scared. 

 

Allowing yourself to let go of judgments allows you to view things as they are rather than through the lens of your own particular judgments based on previous training. 

    • With all of my heart. 
    • Mindfulness is more than a state of consciousness. 
    • Mindfulness is also a matter of the heart. 

 

Being open-hearted means infusing your experience with qualities such as kindness, compassion, warmth, and friendliness. 


If you catch yourself thinking, "I'm worthless at meditation," you may learn to let go of this critical thought and gently return your attention to the meditation's objective, whatever that may be.


You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation here.



What Is Mindfulness? In A Nutshell!


mindfulness concept, mindful living mindfulness concept, mindful living, text written on the sand of beach mindfulness stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images


Mindfulness is filled with characteristics such as attentiveness, compassion, curiosity, purpose, and acceptance. 


At this given instance of time, being aware teaches you how to appreciate the current moment rather than dwelling on the past or worrying about the future. 


  • The past is no longer relevant and cannot be altered. 
  • The future has yet to come and is unknowable. 
  • In the end, the current now, this exact instant, is the only moment you have. 


Mindfulness teaches you how to live in the present moment in a peaceful manner. 


  • You discover how to make the present moment - the only location where you may create, decide, listen, think, grin, act, or live – a more beautiful place to be in. 
  • Awareness and mindfulness meditation, may last anywhere from a few minutes to as long as you choose, can help you build and further deepen the degree of your mindfulness. 


You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation here.


7 Step Mindfulness Physical Sensations Exercise

 


Whether it's a chair, the ground, your bed, or the air surrounding you, your body is always in contact with something. This is a fantastic approach to tune in to your current situation. 

You can be aware of these places of touch at any moment, whether in meditation or in your regular life. 

Because the feelings are often easy to detect, this is an excellent practice for beginners. 

“Mindfulness is the acceptance of the present moment with awareness and balance. It doesn't get much more straightforward than that. It is accepting or opening to the present moment, pleasurable or unpleasant, precisely as it is, without clinging to it or rejecting it.” ~ SYLVIA BOORSTEIN


Instructions


  1. This exercise may be done in any posture, however I recommend doing it while sitting. Close your eyes and focus your attention on your body's posture. Make whatever modest modifications necessary to put your body at peace. 
  2. Begin by observing the areas of the body that are in contact with anything else. Can you feel your feet making touch with the ground? Pay attention to the sensations in your feet. There isn't anything exciting to do. Simply pay attention to how your feet are feeling right now. 
  3. Continue until you can feel your back end making contact with the chair or cushion. Take note of the upper thighs' touch and pressure with the chair. Rest your consciousness here, paying attention to how this feels in your body. 
  4. Bring your focus to your hands, wherever they may be. Feel the locations where your hands are contacting, where you're sitting on your lap, or where your knees are resting. Concentrate on the part of the hand that is making touch with something else. 
  5. Now look for places on your body where you can feel the feeling of the garments. You can run your hand over your body to see whether this sensation is present. The locations where the garment ends and the skin is exposed, such as the arms, neck, and ankles, may be the easiest to feel. 
  6. Finally, pay attention to the feel of air against your skin. You may notice that the temperature of the air on the palm of your hand differs from the temperature on the back of your hand. If you're sitting outside, you could notice the breeze. There is no such thing as right or wrong. Don't be afraid to speak from your personal experience. 
  7. Bring attention to the places of touch throughout the day once you've completed this practice. Feel your body come into touch with the chair whenever you sit down. When you stand up, take note of where your feet are on the ground. 



DEALING WITH OVERWHELMED FEELINGS 


When you first start exploring body awareness, you may realize that multiple sensations are vying for your attention at the same time. 

Try utilizing a mental note or a short phrase while monitoring a certain part of your body to help keep your attention focused. 

  • Consider the phrase "feet. feet. feet" while tuning in to the feet. 
  • Alternatively, if you believe a command would be more effective (which it often is), try “feel my feet. feel my feet. feel my feet.” 
  • Link your inhales and exhales to the rhythm of the words. Congratulations on your achievement! It's as easy as that. You're chanting mantras.


You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation and Healing here.





Loving Kindness Meditation




  • Begin by silently saying to yourself, "May I be joyful, calm, and free of suffering."
  • Simply repeat this statement to yourself, wanting or wanting it to come true. 
  • If you notice that your mind is particularly "stuck" in a negative cycle, you can immediately confront it.
  • For instance, you may say, 
    • "May I be joyful, may I be tranquil...," 
    • "May I learn to let go," 
    • "May I accept whatever happens," 
    • "May I have the fortitude to confront my anxieties," 
    • or "May I be forgiving." 


You'll probably discover, as with the other strategies, that your mind wanders after a while, and you'll need to return your focus to the sentences frequently (remarkably, the mind seems to be able to "speak" these sentences silently even when we're not paying attention to the process). 

The objective here, too, is to be forgiving and approach it all like puppy training. 

You can attempt moving on to others once you've settled into one of these phrases and channeled caring intentions toward yourself (the meditation can also be done in the reverse order, starting with another person and then moving to yourself). 

It's always simplest to start with a benefactor—someone you can readily love and care for. A teacher or other inspirational figure, alive or not, such as Jesus, the Buddha, or the Dalai Lama, might be a friend, family member, or other loved one. 

  1. Close your eyes and envision being with the other person. 
  2. Feel their presence. 
  3. Then start saying things like, "May you be happy, may you be calm, may you be free of sorrow," or anything like. 
  4. Again, the mind is prone to stray, and you'll have to carefully draw it back to the image you've picked. 
  5. After you've spent some time focusing on someone who makes you feel loving-kindness, you can move on to someone else who is significant to you. Call to mind persons who matter one by one. 
  6. After a while, you'll be able to conjure up visions of tiny groupings, such as immediate relatives or close friends. 
  7. Continue to repeat the sentences, channeling caring intentions toward them, while keeping them in mind. In this manner, the meditation continues, stretching outward to include more and more individuals. 
  8. Return to pictures of individuals who more easily inspire sentiments of compassion or loving-kindness if you discover your sentiments of compassion or loving-kindness have dried up. 


Expanding the circle, you might envision all of your family and friends gathered, followed by your workplace, clients, neighbors, or any other group you belong to. 

We soon spread the same good thoughts to larger and larger communities, until we've covered our entire town, city, nation, and, eventually, the entire world. 

This activity can be extended to include all living things. 


It finally settles on the wording,


“May all creatures be joyful, may all beings be tranquil, may all beings be free of suffering”


What did you find out about yourself? 


For everyone of us, loving-kindness meditation brings up quite distinct experiences. 

You'll probably have different sensations each time you do it, just like with other disciplines. 


Take a few minutes right now to scribble down what you noticed at each part of the exercise, as if you were recounting the experience to a friend. 

  • Concentration and mindfulness meditation can both benefit from loving-kindness meditation. 
  • It's all too tempting to be brutally judgmental of our wandering thoughts when practicing focus. 
  • When our minds wander, loving-kindness meditation can help us increase our ability to be nice to ourselves. 


Similarly, while practicing mindfulness meditation and seeing all of the noble and not-so-noble contents that arise in consciousness, lovingkindness meditation assists us in greeting all of them as welcome visitors. 

Lovingkindness meditation can be included into a concentration and/or mindfulness meditation session, or it can be done in its own right.


You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation here.





Mindfulness Meditation for Non Judgement



Acceptance is First Cultivated Within Us. 


All of the formal meditation techniques covered so far entail focusing attention on certain physiological sensations and monitoring the contents of the mind without attempting to modify them. 

They are geared on promoting present-moment awareness and acceptance. Acceptance is sometimes the most difficult aspect of these techniques. 

Our brains may be harshly critical, accusing us of not paying attention, thinking too much, or experiencing something we shouldn't. 


Judgement Meditation


  • Doing a few minutes of "judgment" meditation at work is a funny way to see this: Meditation on Judgment. 
  • This one normally just takes 10–15 minutes to get the information across. 
  • For a minute or two, sit as you would for breath meditation and follow your breath. 
  • Then start paying attention to your thoughts. When a judgment comes up, discreetly name it as "judging." 
    • Many people become aware of an inner stream that runs something like this: “Hmm, I'm doing really well.” 
    • So yet, no conclusions have been reached. 
    • Making a decision, thus judgment. 
    • Oh no. I should've seen I wasn't going to be very good at this. 
    • Making a decision to judge again.
    • Okay, I understand. None of that is true. 
    • I'll just pay attention to my breathing. 
    • Ascending, descending, ascending, ascending, ascending, ascending, That's a lot better. Making a judgement. 
    • I'm damned if I'm not always harsh. “I am judging.”  
    • Return your focus back to your breath each time you label a judgmental though. 


Loving-kindness meditation is an old technique for dealing with our harsh or judgmental inclinations. 

It may take various forms, all aimed at softening our hearts and assisting us in being more tolerant of ourselves and others, a process known as "affectionate awareness." 

Compassion and mindfulness are described as two wings of a bird in ancient meditation writings, underlining the importance of having an open heart in order to have open eyes. 

  • Loving-kindness meditation promotes clear vision by reinforcing the goal to be welcoming and compassionate, rather than masking our true feelings with false positive ones. 
  • The overriding rule for all mindfulness activities is to notice and accept whatever is truly happening in the moment. 
  • The most basic loving-kindness meditation practice is quietly repeating evocative sentences to generate feelings of compassion. 
  • Starting with a period of concentration meditation, perhaps paying attention to our breath or performing some slow walking exercise, is typically the best way to go. 
  • After the mind has calmed down a bit, we strive to produce acceptance and compassion. 
  • This works best when we start with ourselves; other times, it works better when we start with others. 
  • It doesn't matter what terms we choose; you may use whatever terms suit your cultural background and personal preferences. 

It's advisable to practice this meditation for at least 10 minutes to have a feel for it. If you have the time right now, start with a period of concentration exercise, then read and attempt these instructions.


You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation here.





Mindfulness Concentration Insight

 


Mindfulness practice has the potential to help us understand how the mind operates, namely how it causes pain and how it may be eased. 

Mindfulness requires a particular level of attention; without it, we can't fully notice the workings of the mind and become lost in our ideas about what's going on rather than experiencing it directly. 

Because concentration is the cornerstone for mindfulness practice, the activities described generally described as mindfulness have primarily been concentration exercises. From focusing to being aware. 


Most concentration exercises may also be used as mindfulness exercises in the following way: 


  1. After you've found that your mind has calmed down during concentration meditation, you may go on to mindfulness practice. 
  2. At first, this entails discreetly observing where the mind goes when it leaves an object of focus and naming these departures. 
  3. If your mind begins to construct plans during breath meditation, for example, you might make a mental note of “planning” and then restore your focus to the breath. 
  4. You can make a mental note of “judging” if you catch yourself thinking judgmental thoughts. 
  5. You can note "hearing" if your mind travels to other experiences, such as a sound in the room. 
  6. These notes are discreetly murmured in the background, while your primary focus is on your breathing. 
  7. If your mind becomes particularly calm, you can try letting go of the breath entirely as an anchor and allowing your attention to be drawn to whatever objects are currently occupying your attention—whether sounds, sensations of contact as you sit, emotions as they manifest in the body, or other experiences. 
  8. Because we allow the mind to be open to whatever enters our consciousness, this is frequently referred to as choice less awareness. 
  9. The mind is free to roam, but unlike during moments of mindlessness, we stay aware of what is now in our consciousness. 
  10. Allowing ideas and pictures to be objects of our attention is also conceivable, but because most of us become caught in them, this is typically only achievable during prolonged retreat practice. 


It's a fine art to strike the right balance between concentration exercise, in which we return repeatedly to a pre-selected object of attention, and mindfulness practice, in which we let the mind to dwell on diverse objects as they emerge. 


  • You can usually rely on the intensity of your attention to lead you. 
  • When your attention is strong, you might want to try mindfulness more. 
  • You may return to concentration exercise more when it is weaker and your focus is more fragmented. 
  • You'll probably alter whatever sorts of meditation you like as you build a structured practice schedule. 
  • Depending on what you've learned about the impact of each of them for you, you may want to focus on sitting meditation at times and mix in the body scan, walking, or eating activities at other times. 
  • You'll vary when you complete each one as a concentration or mindfulness practice, regardless of whatever style you pick. 

Because each person's intellect and life are unique, it's tough to prescribe a fixed pattern. However, here are some general rules. 


  • If you can only devote 20 minutes to formal practice on a less-than-daily basis, you'll probably prefer concentration practice because your mind won't have enough time to calm down. 
  • Because you'll notice more sessions in which the mind becomes concentrated if you can practice for longer amounts of time more regularly, you'll have more opportunity to add mindfulness practice. 
  • When your mind is busy or disturbed, even with more intense practice, you may be able to maintain attention for days or weeks at a time. 
  • During other times, though, you may start each meditation session with concentration practice, then extend your field of awareness to practice mindfulness—noticing where your mind moves or allowing your attention to rest on diverse mental objects—after the mind has settled a bit. 
  • The key to making these decisions is to be easy on yourself. There is no such thing as a "better" type of practice. 
  • Both disciplines, in the end, help us understand how our minds function and how we unintentionally cause misery to ourselves and others. 
  • There is also a lot of overlap between concentration and mindfulness practices—we may notice where our minds wander when we lose focus when we perform concentration practice, and we can still concentrate on the object at hand when we perform mindfulness practice. 
  • It's best not to stress too much about striking the right balance; with practice, you'll be able to detect which practices to prioritize at any given moment.


You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation here.



Mindfulness of Breath and Body



Finding the Breath in Your Body is a direct experience. When people strive to become more conscious of their breathing, they may picture or picture it. They may also be thinking about their breath. They even say to themselves from time to time: Hey, I'm breathing, see, I'm breathing in, that was a long breath, now I'm breathing out... 

None of these strategies will help you stay focused on the breath (although mental labeling might assist.

Feeling the breath is the key to awareness in breathing exercise. It's crucial to keep your breathing practice from becoming conceptual or cerebral. 


Mindfulness allows you to connect directly to an experience rather than getting caught in its notion. Breath is a bodily sense that may be immediately felt, rather than a notion. 

  • You may think a lot about breath—for example, when you take the time to learn about the science of breathing and breath regulation—but mindfulness requires you to let go of the notions and focus on the "felt sense"—how you actually feel your breath. 
  • This relaxes your cognitive functioning and helps you to learn on a more intuitive level. 
  • After reading this, close your eyes and simply feel your breath in your body to get the felt feeling. 

You can find yourself focusing on one region, or you could notice that your breath is felt throughout your entire body, in moving portions of your body, or in specific places of your body, such as your belly button or nose. Wavelike sensations or little ripples of movement may be felt in various parts of your body. This is when you feel your breath rather than thinking about it. 


You can examine some of those particular regions since you may observe your breathing in a number of places in your body. 


Concentrate your physical and sensory focus on your abdomen. 

  • Put your hand on your abdomen to get a better sense of it. 
  • Are you able to breathe without needing to do anything? 
  • Your stomach is swaying back and forth. 


Take a minute to notice any feelings in your abdomen, then return. 

What did you pick up on? 

  • We're guessing you had a rising and falling experience, an expanding sensation, inflation and deflation sensations, and maybe a contraction in the conclusion. 
  • Perhaps a little moment of silence before the next breath began. 
  • Not what you're envisioning or thinking about the breath, but what you're feeling—the felt sense—is what you're striving to become aware of. 


Another place to pay attention to your breath is in your chest and neck.

Take a few deep breaths in your chest. 

  • What are your thoughts? It's most likely something similar to your abdominal breathing, but a little more widespread. 
  • Do you feel your shoulders heaving slightly when you engage in the action? Remember that everyone's experience with mindfulness will be different, therefore you can't feel the breath wrongly. 


Now pay attention to your nostrils: 


Close your eyes and take a few deep breaths through your nostrils. 

What do you think you've noticed? 

  • As the air rushes in and out, you could get a sense of cold or warmth. Maybe you're getting a tickle on the top of your lip. Perhaps you're aware of a little movement in your nose. 
  • Finally, as your mindfulness meditation practice progresses, you'll want to identify one area to focus on that will serve as your own personal anchor. 
  • Although your breath is your anchor, it might be beneficial to focus your attention on a specific place of your body where you feel your breath. 
  • Choose your belly, chest, or nose as your anchor for sensing the breath once you've investigated these three distinct anchor sites.

Select a location depending on what is most obvious, simplest, or most fascinating to you. If you're having trouble deciding, simply select one—they'll all function just as well. What matters is that you are at ease in your surroundings. 

Alternatively, some people may feel the breath most vividly as it moves through their entire body, which can also serve as a general anchor. 

It may take some time to find your place, so try out a few different ones at the start of your meditation practice until you find one that works for you.


You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation and Healing here.



Does Mindfulness Really Work? A Scientific Enquiry.

 


The process of paying nonjudgmental attention to the current moment has been termed as mindfulness.

The awareness of breathing is commonly employed as an attentional anchor to manage ruminative thought in the early stages of mindfulness training; however mindfulness involves much more than just noticing the breath.


It is based on Buddhist practice and has been the subject of empirical research, with over scientific publications on mindfulness released in the last decade. The evidence for its use in the treatment of depression and anxiety is the strongest.

The impact sizes of mindfulness in these two illnesses have often been reported in the moderate-strong to strong range in meta-analyses. However, because some of the studies included in these meta-analyses failed to account for the placebo effect, it's not unexpected that meta-analyses with stricter inclusion criteria yield lower results.

A recent meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of mindfulness-based stress reduction, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, and other mindfulness-based interventions—each with an active control—found small to moderate effect sizes in the treatment of depression or anxiety after eight weeks of mindfulness training, with a reduction in effect size after three to six months.


Although the findings are less impressive, they are equivalent to those that would be expected from antidepressant therapy in a primary care population without the side effects.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and the American Psychiatric Association both recommend mindfulness-based cognitive treatment for individuals with recurrent depression, based on these findings.

Other psychiatric diseases, such as schizophrenia spectrum disorders, eating disorders, chemical and non-chemical addiction disorders, and sleep disorders, may benefit from mindfulness-based therapies, according to some data.

Despite the fact that mindfulness has recently been added to the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists' practice guidelines as a non-first-line treatment for adults with binge eating disorder, there is arguably insufficient evidence from well-designed randomized trials to support its use for conditions other than depression and anxiety.


Mindfulness may potentially have a role in the treatment of somatic illnesses such as psoriasis, cancer, HIV infection, irritable bowel syndrome, heart disease, hypertension, lung disease, diabetes mellitus, and chronic pain, according to growing evidence.

Randomized trials show that mindfulness-based therapies, such as mindfulness-based stress reduction and cognitive therapy, are minimally to moderately effective in the treatment of chronic pain, with potential applications in the treatment of pain-related diseases like fibromyalgia.

However, it's unclear if mindfulness improves patients' capacity to manage with pain or lessens the frequency and severity of pain.

There is inadequate high-quality data to support mindfulness for treating somatic diseases, except for chronic pain and particular pain syndromes.



Questions that remain unanswered


As previously stated, different methodological issues restrict the overall quality of the data on mindfulness's efficacy.

A type of "popularity impact" may impact results in particular. Because mindfulness is becoming more popular, participants' perceptions of getting a "fashionable" or "proven" psychotherapy practice may affect outcomes.

Because it's very hard to blind patients from the knowledge that they're employing mindfulness techniques, this is a challenging confounding variable to control for.

We also need more clarity on whether positive outcomes last for years rather than months, whether mindfulness interventions have any negative side effects, and the validity of the traditional view among contemplative traditions that long-term improvements in health and wellbeing require daily mindfulness practice over many years, rather than just attending a retreat.


In addition, data is needed to identify whether mindfulness in general or specific interventional procedures are more useful for a particular condition.

Numerous interventions have been developed, with significant variation in factors such as total participant-facilitator contact hours, including whether one-on-one contact is provided, quantity and duration of guided mindfulness exercises, use of non-mindfulness psychotherapeutic techniques such as psychoeducation or group discussion, inclusion of a full day silent retreat, and emphasis on self-practitioner interaction.

Mindfulness is defined and operationalized differently in different interventions. Recent research, for example, has concentrated on second-generation mindfulness therapies like the eight-week Meditation Awareness Training, which are founded on the notion that mindfulness is a psycho-spiritual rather than just psychological skill.

It's challenging to extrapolate findings across the whole spectrum of treatments due to significant differences in design and pedagogic approach.


Mindfulness appears to be beneficial in improving perceptual distance from stressful psychological and physical stimuli and in causing functional neuro-plastic changes in the brain, according to emerging evidence.

However, mindfulness's "fashionable" reputation among the public and the scientific community may have obscured the need to investigate crucial methodological and practical difficulties related to its efficacy.


You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation and Healing here.