Showing posts with label nibandhas. Show all posts
Showing posts with label nibandhas. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Was Mitra Mishra?

 


Mitra Mishra (early 17th c.) is the author of the Viramitrodaya, a compendium of Hindu lore.

The Viramitrodaya is an example of a class of commentarial literature known as nibandhas (“collections”).

The compilers of the nibandhas culled references on a particular theme from the Vedas, dharma literature, puranas, and other authoritative religious texts, placing these excerpts into a single volume.

Each of the Viramitrodaya’s twenty-two sections is devoted to a particular aspect of Hindu life, such as daily practice, worship, gift-giving (dana), vows, pilgrimage, penances (prayashchitta), purification, death rites (antyeshthi samskara), and law; the final section is devoted to final liberation of the soul (moksha) (moksha).

In addition to citing the relevant scriptural passages, Mitra Mishra also provides extensive commentary of his own.

His work became an important source for later legal interpretation, particularly in eastern India.


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Hinduism - Who Was Lakshmidhara?


Lakshmidhara (ca. mid-12th c.) is a scholar, commentator, and creator of the Kalpataru, one of the oldest instances of nibandhas ("collections") commentary literature.

The nibandhas were Hindu encyclopedias that gathered topics from the Vedas, dharma literature, puranas, and other authorized religious books into one volume.

The fourteen volumes of the Kalpataru are each dedicated to a different facet of Hindu life, including as daily practice, worship, gift-giving, vows, pilgrimage, penances (prayashchitta), cleansing, and liberation (moksha).

The Kalpataru served as a model for subsequent authors as one of the first nibands.

Lakshmidhara's work is unique in that he relies on just a few sources, chiefly the epic Mahabharata and a few puranas (sectarian compendia).

He does not reference the Vedas, the oldest Hindu religious books, or the regulations contained in the dharma literature, unlike subsequent interpreters.

His book is nearly entirely made up of selected portions with very little original commentary, although subsequent nibandha authors sometimes provide lengthy explanations. 


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.