Showing posts with label purity. Show all posts
Showing posts with label purity. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Is Vibhishana In Hindu Mythology?

 



Vibhishana is the younger brother of Ravana, the demon king of Lanka, in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics.

Vibhishana, Ravana, and their third brother, Kumbhakarna, practiced extreme physical asceticism (tapas) in their youth in order to win boons from the gods.


Unlike his brothers, who have chosen boons to improve their military skill and fame, Vibhishana requests that he stay virtuous in the face of peril, and this trait defines his life.


When Ravana gathers a council of war before fighting Rama's army, Vibhishana is the only one who votes against fighting and instead recommends Ravana to restore Rama's stolen wife, Sita, and seek Rama's forgiveness.

Ravana expels his brother from the city as a result of these comments, and Vibhishana joins Rama's army, where he battles courageously throughout the conflict.


Rama appoints Vibhishana king of Lanka after Ravana's death as a reward for his faithfulness and integrity.


In Indian mythology, demons (in this instance, the sort of demons known as rakshasas) are not intrinsically wicked, as Vibhishana exemplifies.

They are formidable creatures who may battle gods and mankind, yet they also possess many qualities.

Vibhishana is shown as a great devotee (bhakta) of Rama in the Ramcharitmanas, a vernacular retelling of the Ramayana authored by the poet-saint Tulsidas (1532–1623? ), in line with Tulsidas' emphasis on devotion above all other types of religious activity.


~Kiran Atma


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - How Prevalent Is Vegetarianism In Hindu Society?

 

 

Vegetarianism is an ageless and long enduring dietary practice that carries extremely high status among Hindu people, probably because of its associations with strict brahmin practice; even people who are nonvegetarian themselves will commonly think of a vegetarian diet as “purer.” 

It may have become more prominent and mainstream under certain monarchs over the past few millennia but has certainly taken shape as a voluntary practice with philosophical undertones that define Hinduism.


Strict vegetarians eat no flesh or eggs, but milk and milk products are always eaten and are considered pure and health-giving, probably because they come from the cow.

Those people who keep the strictest diets will also often refrain from onions and garlic, which are considered to excite the passions.

This religious commitment to vegetarianism by a certain part of the population, and the general status given to “pure” vegetarian food, are both responsible for the great variety of vegetarian cooking found in Indian culture.

Despite the higher status given to a vegetarian diet, most modern Hindus are not vegetarian—a recent poll of urban Hindus found that only about 25 per cent were pure vegetarian, although the number may be higher in villages, which tend to be more traditional.


~Kiran Atma


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.