Showing posts with label shamanic practitioner. Show all posts
Showing posts with label shamanic practitioner. Show all posts

Shamanism Today



Why is shamanism, in all of its forms, becoming more popular? What is the reason behind this now? 


In a nutshell, we may say that humans have an inherent desire to grow into ‘all that we can become,' and that we have reached a point when a shift in awareness and a change in our way of life are unavoidable if we are to continue to progress – or even live – as a species. 


  • Over the past two millennia, our efforts have shifted to a greater emphasis on material reality, economic progress, consumerism, and scientifically oriented mental development. 
  • This has resulted in materially prosperous civilizations while neglecting our inner and spiritual growth. We've lost touch with the Earth, our souls, and the holy both inside and beyond, and we've lost our sense of greater meaning and purpose. 

The shamanic archetype, that deep knowing pattern inside us, reminds us of how it felt to be focused on soul and spirit, immersed in a community, and feeling ourselves as a vital component of life. 

It serves as a reminder of what we must return to on our human journey in order to become balanced and complete. 


We have reached a point in human evolution where many of us are beginning to recognize that our materialistic worldviews, societal economic structures, and one-sided development have resulted in a slew of ecological, economic, social, and political issues, as well as, most importantly, "soulless" societies. 


We paid a far greater price than can be described in any framework described by mere words. 


  • Environmental catastrophe, animal extinction, the destruction and uprooting of virtually all indigenous civilizations across the globe, slavery's brutality, religious crusades, horrific global wars, and more all tell their own stories.
  • Even our much-lauded economic growth has now resulted in unprecedented wealth disparity, with 1% of the world's population owning 48% of the world's wealth.  
  • We pay a hefty price even in affluent nations where we enjoy a large part of the produced riches. We've hit new highs in terms of so-called "mental illnesses," with depression and anxiety disorders leading the way, followed by loneliness and isolation. 
  • The strain to be 'well adjusted' in a culture that denies one's soul is taking its toll. 


I find it unsurprising that soul suffering, which has long been ignored at best and denied at worst in contemporary society, is now showing up in the consulting rooms of medical practitioners, therapists, and psychiatrists in the form of psychosomatic pains, diffuse emotional disturbances, hopelessness, disenchantment, and energy depletion as a result of psychosomatic pains, diffuse emotional disturbances, hopelessness, disenchantment, and depletion of energy. 


  • We would not exist as a society if we did not study and feed the mind, according to Jung. He saw, as do many others now, that we would lose our souls in the process. 
  • When we engage in shamanism, we learn that there is no such thing as ‘wholeness,' no good human growth, no ultimate pleasure, happiness, and fulfillment without nurturing our souls, extending our awareness, and seeing ourselves as an integral part of the whole. 

The shamanic archetype is stirring inside the human psyche because it symbolizes what we've lost: 


  • Our connection to the Earth, nature, our soul, and the holy. 
  • It embodies all our disjointed mind yearns for. 
  • It is a symbol of mystery, enchantment, and community. 
  • It symbolizes our desire to break through our brains' restricting cognitive and ego boundaries, to change our states and allow our awareness soar, so that we may experience the holy in all of its awe-inspiring forms. 
  • It symbolizes the human desire to move beyond the mundane and into the realm of the miraculous. 
  • It symbolizes our ability to create our own reality via our imagination. 


As you read these words, the shamanic soul inside you' has already woken and is requesting time and space to grow in order for your journey to unfold. It's time to get started.


You may also want to read more about Shamanism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Modern Shamanism - A Living Practice



Since the initial wave of Western interest pushed shamanism to the fore, it has seen a massive rebirth as well as many modifications. 

It has drawn innumerable spiritual searchers as well as increasing attention – and acceptance – from anthropologists, medical practitioners, psychologists, physicists, biologists, and therapists as it has grown more urban, global, and digitally linked. 

Many westerners started to bring back what they had learnt from indigenous shamans, mostly in South America, and practice shamanism themselves in the 1970s and 1980s, conducting courses and workshops and establishing schools, centers, and foundations. 


We now have a second generation of shamanic instructors all across the Western world thanks to these institutions. 


  • Traditional shamans and teachers from Mexico and South America began to travel to the United States and Europe to spread their teachings, while Hopi, Lakota, and Navajo elders and teachers sent increasingly urgent ecological messages to the world, attracting seekers and inspiring foundations, schools, and courses in the United States and Europe. 
  • In the 1990s, publications like Luisah Teish's Carnival of the Spirit, which exposed the world to the Yoruba sacred traditions, and Malidoma Somé's writings on the Dagara people brought African shamanism to the fore.  
  • Shamanism from the Far East, Tibet, and Nepal, which includes fascinating Buddhist components, has made its way into mainstream modern shamanism in the past 20 years or so. 
  • Australian Aboriginal instructors may now be found on social media and at conferences, while shamans and their teachings have grown more widely available in Mongolia and Siberia. 

Parallel to this, many Western shamanic practitioners and instructors have been bringing groups of seekers to study from traditional shamans in different areas of the globe, while traditional shamans have been opening their doors to a growing number of individuals. 


  • This has now nearly reached the level of mass tourism, particularly in Mexico, the Amazon, and the Andes. 
  • We are now witnessing shamanism being incorporated into different movements and fields in diverse ways, adding to the mind-boggling variety. 
  • Shamanic cosmology has been integrated into the awareness movement. 
  • Ethnomedicine is becoming more popular throughout the globe. Shamanic ideas of human consciousness have been integrated into strands of transpersonal psychology. 
  • The Earth-based components have been widely embraced by the ecology movement. 
  • The modern world's interconnectedness is mirrored in contemporary shamanism's mixes and combinations, the intertwining of the ancient and the new. 


Contemporary shamanism's characteristics 


Because modern shamanism is such a mixed bag, it's difficult to describe it exactly, but we may compare it to traditional shamanism and learn about the parallels and contrasts, as most literature does. 


  • Western shamanic practitioners and instructors are not shamans in the classic sense (I prefer the word "shamanic practitioner" instead). 
  • They are neither descended from shaman lineages, nor have they undergone the deep initiation rituals and lengthy training periods that traditional shamans have through. 
  • They aren't part of traditional indigenous groups, therefore their work isn't grounded in "location and custom." 

Western shamanic methods are more focused on the growth and healing of the individual, in accordance with the shift away from groups and toward the individual. 



Despite this, much of the ancient shamanic methods' worldview, goals, and instruments are shared by modern shamanic approaches. 


  • They strive for completeness in the same way as traditional shamans do, concentrating on the integration of the mind/body with the soul/spirit and the entire person with the larger field of spirit. 
  • They also labor for the community, but in a broader sense or by establishing communities with a particular purpose, such as the numerous circles that exist locally across the Western world. 
  • They also use altered states to create a portal between realms, expand our awareness, and help us comprehend our own nature, all while returning us to a soul-centered way of existence that is linked to Earth, spirit, and the holy. 
  • In terms of working with spirits and spirit allies, as well as the usage of a wide variety of tools established within traditional shamanism, contemporary shamanism is similar to traditional shamanism. 
  • It incorporates myths, tales, and archetypal symbols, as well as trance dancing, vision quests, wilderness camps, lucid dreaming, natural hallucinogens, different energy healing methods, medicine wheel teachings, and other techniques. 



Traditional shamans and contemporary shamanic practitioners and instructors both recognize that the teachings ultimately originate from spirit. 


  • Even if they are competent in their trade, excellent practitioners will always work with the aid of spirit, and effective teaching will enhance the student's spirit connection. 
  • We can use the vast knowledge that is increasingly being passed on to us by traditional shamans for our own healing and development, as long as we understand that shamanism is about spirit, soul, Earth, connection, consciousness, and community. 
  • The teachings and practices developed over millennia belong to us all, as they are derived from Earth and spirit, and we can use the vast knowledge that is increasingly being passed on to us by traditional shamans for our own healing and development. 
  • Contemporary shamanism is about discovering our own methods of integrating those important, timeless, and universal lessons into our life. 

Our lives grow more enchanted, meaningful, purposeful, and genuine when we engage in shamanic practices, and we assume our proper positions as positive co-creators in the evolving flow of life, linked to and in harmony with spirit – and our own spirit.


You may also want to read more about Shamanism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Shamanic Traditions



Shamanism in its traditional form is a global phenomenon. Accounts from the past Our understanding of shamanism in indigenous societies is limited, but we do have reports from early European visitors to many areas of the globe, as well as current academic research. 


  • Recently, reports from shamans descending from traditional lineages from all over the globe have surfaced. 
  • Early European encounters with tribal shamans, which began in the 16th century, are significant records because they have shaped public perceptions of shamanism for generations, and continue to do so to some degree now. 
  • The Europeans were terrified by the euphoric rites, magical ceremonies, strange healing techniques, foreign chants, masks and ceremonial attire, drumming, trance dances, and weird visions. 
  • They associated shamanic activities with witchcraft and consorting with the devil, reflecting that dread as well as the Christian theological beliefs of the period. 
  • Later, during the Age of Enlightenment, most Europeans condemned shamans of being either tricksters and charlatans or psychotics and schizophrenics, in line with the new "logical thinking." 


It took a long time for the western perception of shamans to shift. 


Between 1930 and 1950, anthropologists, ethnologists, psychologists, and biologists started on a more intensive study of the surviving indigenous civilizations across the globe, learning their languages, interviewing shamans, and documenting their own studies. 


  • For example, in 1932, John Neihardt published the now-famous life story of Black Elk, an Oglala Sioux medicine man, revealing him as a great visionary, healer, and leader, and in 1949, Claude Lévi-Strauss, a renowned French anthropologist, compared shamans to psychoanalysts, emphasizing their vast knowledge of the human mind and finally putting to rest the notion that they were insane.\
  • Most significant, anthropological studies revealed that, despite cultural variations, all shamans claimed to converse with spirits for the sake of their society. 

Shamanism, however, did not get the recognition it deserved until the second part of the twentieth century: 


  • Archaic Techniques of Ecstasy, published in 1951 and still a major reference work today, provided a synthesis of cross-cultural research while dispelling many misconceptions and prejudices, and coined the term "masters of ecstasy" to describe shamans' altered states and soul flights to other worlds. 

While Eliade's book sparked professional interest, it was Carlos Castaneda's 1969 book The Teachings of Don Juan: 

  • A Yaqui Way of Knowledge that sparked unprecedented public interest and inspired Western spiritual seekers and researchers to live with indigenous peoples, "study" shamans, and participate in (mostly plant-induced) ceremonies and quests. 
  • Shamans functioned as psycho-spiritual and physical healers, ritualists, mythologists, mediums, and visionaries, utilizing their talents for the benefit of their tribes, according to later accounts, and were pioneers in investigating the human mind's broader potential. 

Traditional shamanism's characteristics 


These and other research have revealed that traditional shamans throughout the globe share similar cosmologies, working methods, and traits, while not being a culturally homogeneous group. 


  • Traditional shamanism is a global method for expanding awareness, connecting with energy other realms, and working with such forces for the good of a community and its members' health and peace. Shamans are therefore regarded as world-bridges and guardians of the group's spiritual, psychological, and ecological balance, as well as the individual members'. 
  • Shamans in indigenous cultures rely on nature, the spirit realms, and their tribes for survival. Indigenous traditional shamans, who either come from a bloodline or are "selected by spirit," are known for their dependency. 
  • Their initiation is lengthy and severe, and they often go through a time of change accompanied by a life-threatening mental or physical sickness, which leads to death and rebirth experiences in highly altered states of consciousness. 
  • Shamans had – and continue to have – a wide understanding of the natural and spiritual realms, which they use in their work as healers, visionaries, divinatory practitioners, ritualists and ceremonialists, mythologists, mediums, dreamers, psychics, psychopomps, artists, manifestors, and instructors. 
  • They utilize a variety of talents and methods to ‘fly' to the spirit realms, operate within them, and connect the worlds. 
  • Smoke and herbs, rituals and ceremony, power tools and clothing, trance dance and trance movements, merging with and shapeshifting into nature spirits and animal spirits, close connections with ancestral spirits and spirit allies, ingestion of hallucinogenic sacred plants, and the vibrations of drum rhythms, sounds, and voices are all examples of these.


You may also want to read more about Shamanism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.




What Is Shamanism?



Shamanism is the world's oldest spiritual discipline and practice. 


It is a dynamic tradition, like all organically formed systems: 


  • It has assumed a variety of shapes in many civilizations at various periods. It is, nevertheless, a universal route, with striking parallels throughout the world and across time. 
  • The Americas, Russia, Africa, Asia, the Far East, and China, as well as Europe, Australia, and New Zealand, all have remnants of shamanism. 
  • In Spain and France, we have cave paintings that are 30–40,000 years old. 
  • In Australia's outback, we have cave paintings dating back approximately 28,000 years. 
  • The rock art of Niger, Africa, goes back 30,000 years, while a female shaman skeleton discovered in Israel is about 12,000 years old. 
  • Our understanding of shamanism is further enriched by ancient myths, tales, and traditional rituals. 
  • The creation tales of the Americas, Australia, and Africa, as well as the rituals, symbols, and beliefs of Buddhism, Taoism, and Shintoism, all include strong aspects of shamanic spirituality. 


The old spiritual path's continuity has been interrupted, fractured, and repressed many times, mostly by invaders, missionaries, and political actions, but it has never been completely eliminated. 

Shaman lineages have maintained the practice alive over the centuries in isolated places; 


In other parts of the globe, it has been driven underground, only to resurface when repressing forces have withdrawn or relaxed their hold. 


  • This may be seen in South America, particularly in the Amazon and the High Andes, where shamanism thrives despite Spanish conquerors and missionaries' efforts to eradicate it. 
  • Similarly, despite colonial and ecclesiastical attempts, tribal shamanic traditions were never completely eliminated in Africa and Australia. 
  • The rebirth of North American indigenous traditions, as well as the robust post-Soviet comeback of shamanism in Siberia and Mongolia, which I saw with awe on a recent trip, demonstrate the long-term viability of this old spiritual discipline. 
  • Most sources claim that the term "shaman" comes from the Evenki language of the Tungus tribe of Siberia, since it is closely similar to their word "saman," which means "one who knows" or "one who is aroused, moved, or elevated." 

Even if they have various titles in different cultures, such as medicine man or woman in North America and Canada, healer in Africa, or kupua in Hawaii, the gender-neutral word "shaman" is now used in general for individuals who are engaged in the practice.


You may also want to read more about Shamanism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.


Shamanism and Biomagnetic fields

 



The SQUID (superconducting quantum information device) 

Magnetometer (biomagnetic field mapping device) is a highly sensitive technology that can map biomagnetic fields created by physiological processes in the body. J. E. Zimmerman, a former Ford Motor Company scientist, was the driving force behind its growth. SQUID was the first practical electronic device to track interaction between matter's energy waves, and it is now regarded as one of the best magnetic flux detectors. Special rooms shielding environmental energies have been designed in combination with SQUID technologies in order to study highly subtle magnetic fields in the brain and other parts of the body.

Konstantin Korotkov, a physics professor at Russia's St. Petersburg State Technical University, came up with another invention. Korotkov, a bioelectrography specialist, created a computerized device that allows for what he calls "Gas Discharge Visualization" (GDV).

GDV, which is based on Kirlian imaging, allows for the study of human energy fields and can aid in the observation of energy transitions in a number of circumstances, including as treatments are performed.

Polycontrast Interference Photography is another new technique with a lot of potential for diagnosing physical and psychiatric illnesses (PIP). It consists of a digital camera and patented software that measures the energy released as two waveforms collide, and it was invented by British researcher Harry Oldfield. The photonic discharge that results creates an image that reveals areas of illness and fitness. 

Chakras, meridians, and physiologic states, as well as the effects of human intention and a variety of environmental factors, are all readily discernible. 

In the United States, Oldfield worked with physician Brian Dailey, and in India, he worked with Thornton Streeter, Director of The Centre for Biofield Sciences. In one study, the crown chakra of a delusional individual was found to be distinctly broken. PIP mapped the changes in a seasoned meditator's consciousness as he went from normal waking consciousness to deep meditation and back to normal waking consciousness in another profile. PIP observations, including GDV experiments, are classified as speculative because it's unclear what energies are being tracked.

The science of metabolic function at the cellular level is also known as bioenergetics. Scientists at prestigious universities are showing the importance of energetic flow and transformation of illness and recovery as a result of this research.

The Institute of Bioenergetics at the University of Colorado in Colorado Springs, for example, is developing “a multidisciplinary approach to studying cellular metabolism and cellular connectivity with the aim of treating or curing severe diseases.” The field of cellular signaling (how cells communicate) is now progressing from the study of physical processes—for example, a hormone docking with a cellular receptor, which sets off a chain of events—to studying energetic signaling, of which the physical cascade's first source is energetic in nature.

In the laboratory of John McMichael, immunologist, virologist, and curator of Beech Tree Labs and The Institute for Therapeutic Discovery, another field of investigation is underway. Decades of laboratory and preclinical research have shown the promise of a class of formulations that use low amounts of naturally occurring molecules—proteins and DNA, for example—to address a broad variety of diseases.

The dosages are much higher than in homoeopathy, but much smaller than in most modern pharmaceuticals.

Scientific evidence indicating the receptors are affected and which genes are up- or down-regulated (turned on or off) suggests that this platform could lead to a new understanding of how the body functions.

Scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill found that McMichael's groundbreaking breakthrough for curing depression didn't work by the biopathways common with modern antidepressants since it showed effectiveness in confirmed animal tests. These results led to the hypothesis that the agent works by a process of energetic contact that instructs the body to rebalance itself. McMichael himself believes there may be an energetic network made up of receptors in cells or the extracellular matrix that aids in the restoration of homeodynamics (a more descriptive term for homeostasis), the body's normal balance. As a result, he now concentrates his focus on sub-molecular processes.

Nonlocal healing, in which an individual's or a group's well-focused purpose can have a huge impact on the wellbeing of anyone thousands of miles away, is often on the cutting edge of bioenergetics. Although this process is often classified as mystical or religious, the cause of nonlocal healing is generally thought to be energy-based, whether it is focused by dowsing, praying, or other methods. Physician Larry Dossey and research scientist Marilyn Mandala Schlitz of the Institute of Noetic Sciences are among those who have studied this mechanism of healing scientifically. They have found positive yet contradictory findings, as is typical when studying putative energies. The common denominator of how the different approaches to nonlocal healing concentrate energy is often considered to be intentionality, or the deliberate application of meaning. The scientific mapping of intent is still a long way off.

If healing rituals and hardwired technologies—which get to the heart of the human condition—are energy effects that necessitate looking at the whole being as well as environmental factors, both the quantum physicist's "unified field" and the mystic's "everything is one" insight point to a shared universe. This takes us closer to the aspects of the human condition that are universal, regardless of color, gender, or creed. Although there has been a lot of literature on the energetics of living environments, it hasn't been presented in the light of Western European philosophical ideas and traditions for the most part. This is beginning to change. For decades, science has been catching up to what the Toltecs have been telling about the universe and the healing methods TCM has been providing. The healing therapies of bioenergetics—often referred to as "energy medicine"—appears to be very complex, have strong historical origins, and constitute an emerging multidisciplinary field of modern science.

New models, new factors for investigation, and new tools for healing and wellness will continue to sprout whether energy is in any sense a determinant for biological behavior and reactions. These revelations, on the other hand, do not throw a completely new net of knowledge over the science community. They are predicated on prior experience. According to Oschman, “the new hypotheses should not cause us to forget our sophisticated understandings of genetics, biochemistry, or molecular biology.”

“Instead, they refine our understanding of living systems and healing at deeper structural and functional levels.”

Magnetic electrical input and other forms of energy-based signals are continuously received and emitted by the human body. The body has an array of energy-detection apparatuses, from drawing in the Sun's energy and turning it to Vitamin D, to hearing impacting brain areas, to photon-detection receptors in the retina. Chemical reactions are triggered by the presence of electricity. Furthermore, the modern discipline of electromyography, which tracks electrical currents behind muscle contraction, has over a century of study behind it, demonstrating that this form of action happens spontaneously within the body.

“We are in a time of radical transition in the healthcare system,” says Oschman, a recognized pioneer in the area of biophysics. In this phase, Energy Medicine plays a critical role. The explanation for this is that traditional Western medicine is the first medicinal practice in existence to have largely overlooked the concept of energy. Nearly all complementary and holistic therapies that the population is enthusiastically turning toward have energetic concepts.” “‘In every society and in every medical practice before ours, healing was done by transferring energy,” Oschman continues, quoting Albert Szent-Györgyi (who received a Nobel Prize in for his synthesis of vitamin C).

“Nothing occurs in nature without an energy exchange,” says physicist Milo Wolff. Communication or the development of some sort of information requires an energetic transition. There are no exceptions to this rule. This is a natural law.”


You may also want to read more about Shamanism here.

Also, be sure to check out our section on Religion.





Shamanism and Energy

 



The Toltec worldview, a type of shamanism in which the energy body plays a central role. Based on this core theme, I've discovered that these ancient teachings reveal underlying mechanisms of consciousness and cognition, including how we shape meaning, and give us the ability to intentionally cultivate ever-expanding worldviews over the course of 35 years. These teachings aren't isolated from the rest of the world. They are, beyond a doubt, a natural extension of existing fields such as philosophy and research. They have the potential to have an effect on other fields and to greatly expand the boundaries of agreed expertise.

Others have written about Toltec beliefs and rituals as well, bringing what was once obscure to the forefront of mystical literature. Toltec literature has grown in popularity worldwide since Carlos Castaneda's first novel, The Teachings of Don Juan, was written in the late 1960s. Victor Sanchez, Florinda Donner, Taisha Abelar, Miguel Ruiz, Susan Gregg, and other Toltec practitioners have since contributed to a growing body of practice.

Though Castaneda and his books became well-known, his work in presenting an emic account of Toltec teachings (from the perspective of a participant rather than an outside, "objective" observer) won him a doctorate in anthropology from UCLA. Carlos Castaneda's doctorate has not been revoked, despite claims to the contrary. When assessing Castaneda's work, the emic format must be taken into account. The substance of his books has been accused of being intuited or even invented by him.

However, if we apply an emic criterion to his work and see it as coming from within the Toltec shamanic culture rather than the more traditional watching and documenting from a distance from the event under investigation, the expression of his instruction is completely compatible with that body of teachings. His books should then be interpreted as the conclusion of a learning project in which one must put the lessons into practice. As a result, rather than intuiting his books as is customary, he used directions from his teacher, don Juan Matus, for "dreaming."

He greatly expanded conversation and action into new areas of human capacity by doing so. Castaneda's books are a good part of having understood and enacted the method in this light, a true reflection of emic anthropology.

Shamanism for the Age of Science, on the other hand, is not a "Toltec" book in the sense that it does not provide rituals based exclusively on that experience. It instead focuses on facets of the energy body that are important to all, not just those of esoteric interests. It distils the nature of what Toltec shamans learned about the fundamental framework of the human energy body—particularly when it applies to person and collective learning—and examines it and its impact on consciousness via a modern lens. References to don Juan's teachings, the central character of Castaneda's novels, are intended to maintain the lineage's continuity. When Castaneda codified a formerly oral culture, a new mold was cast, undermining the evolution sequence; only time can tell what consequences this had. Since the Toltec strain of shamanism is based on discovering the energy body rather than instilling a fixed theory, it always takes unexpected turns. “There is no official version of Toltec knowledge,” don Juan said, “and the passing of time necessitates new ways of reading and elucidating it.”

Shamanism has always been articulated in words that are important to the people it represents, as one of the oldest traditions in philosophy, regeneration, education, and other means of speech related to the people it serves. Since we live in a scientific age, the depiction of shamanism offers an incentive for shamanism and science to engage in more than a passing conversation.


Gerald Piel, the father of Scientific American and author of The Age of Science, eloquently portrays a world where committed men and women have mapped facets of life that were once confined to the realms of mystics and alchemists. Our understanding of subjects like light, space, time, genes, and geology, to name a few, has been transformed dramatically thanks to the efforts of dedicated scientists.

However, the realms of science and shamanism remain diametrically opposed, with those in each camp scratching their heads as they observe the other. Philosophical propositions that occur only as mental objects are challenging, if not impossible, to research scientifically. The foundation of what might be called speculation is not observational, not based on experiment and observation, the bedrock of science.




You may also want to read more about Shamanism here.

Also, be sure to check out our section on Religion.





Shamanism Complements Science

  



A New Partnership

When precise conditions for measurement, such as the energy body and its processes, are given, shamanism emerges.


These objects are on the cusp of science, since they can be researched with the same meticulousness that has gone into other fields of research. Chemistry, for example, is a fundamental component of science, while intent—focused energy— is a foundational component in shamanism.

Scientists are starting to look at intent in ways like remote healing and how an experimenter may affect an experiment, and shamans can come to see chemical behavior and reactions as refined embodiments of intent. In contrast, shamans' observations of the authoritative energetic systems in human anatomy and cosmology provide scientists with an ability to explore previously unexplored scientific territory.

Things seem to be moving in this direction. We are at a stage in our history where the realms of science and ancient ways of consciousness study are mixing, as His Holiness the Dalai Lama's book The Universe in a Single Atom demonstrates. In this regard, there is a clear compatibility between science and shamanism, as both are tools for understanding more about how we work and the environment we live in.

Shamanism complements science by offering a contemporary, cross-cultural background, and science augments shamanism by unveiling new paths of exploration.

Whether or not this partnership takes place would have no bearing on either party's success. If it does not, it would be a waste of time and neither party learned from the other. Science also has an endless number of possibilities to discover, and shamanism will continue to exist whether or not it is approved by scientific authority. In this vein, I combine shamanism and science because I've discovered that the two together offer a solid stepping-stone to enhanced knowledge of human nature and abilities.



You may also want to read more about Shamanism here.

Also, be sure to check out our section on Religion.




Shamanism As a State of Consciousness

 



Bioenergetics, a quickly expanding research field that nicely blends with developments in understanding cognition, or how we come to know and understand, is mentioned as part of this strategy. To further explain how the energy body governs consciousness, this is laced with physics and neuroscience considerations. 


One of the greatest puzzles of all time is how to define consciousness.

We don't need to describe consciousness to use it to become more conscious, however. We do need the resources offered by background and procedures that are specifically designed to promote the creation and use of consciousness.

Psychology was known as a theory of mental existence in the eighteenth century, and it took the first steps toward being a discipline in the nineteenth century, according to Blackmore. Bringing some of the many aspects of psychology to bear on the riddle of consciousness gives one another avenue to at least experiment with it and perhaps draw more value from applying it to the spirit body, particularly provided that shamanism has been dubbed "America's oldest psychology." This also refers to the different forms of shamanism that can be seen all over the world, since it is indeed one of the most prevalent influences. As a result, both shamanism and science have cross-cultural significance and are important in today's world.


As time passed, Toltec perception investigators continued their work and delivered a sophisticated constellation of knowledge about the energy body, including concrete, consistent sources that detail the energy body as an empirical, observable aspect of our anatomy. These viewpoints also have a unified view, allowing for an accounting of the wisdom acquired in the different philosophical traditions that research the universe as energy.

The energy body, by its very essence, encompasses all aspects of human activity. As a result of Toltec considerations, we should reexamine classic literature from other religions, such as the perennial philosophies of Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, and Christianity. Shamanic origins run the gamut from animism and pantheism to monotheism in these sects of mysticism. Shamanic research also looks at time-honored metaphysical questions like ethics, free will, and the ontological state of being.




You may also want to read more about Shamanism here.

Also, be sure to check out our section on Religion.





Shamanism and The Physical Body's Energy

  


This study of the human experience is unique because of the breadth of this perspective and the possibilities it highlights.


It's worth looking at. In some ways, this is strange, because Toltec lore claims that what became the highly refined worldview of today began to coalesce 5,000 to 7,000 years ago in the center of what is now a third-world nation, Mexico. Around the same time, the teachings of the Toltecs do not exist in a vacuum. Many disciplines, traditions, and people have added to our understanding of the energy body, from medical medicine to homoeopathy to ancient Taoism.

I've discovered that failing to recognize our personal energy body is akin to trying to walk down the street without using our muscles. There is so much more than being human that is yet to be discovered. The development of understanding of our greater capacity leads to a radical shift in how we see the environment and, as a result, shifts in behavior. This improved interaction with our environment allows for more learning, and new ways to learn. Learning is dependent on how much you use the skills you have at your hands, as well as using those resources to begin with. You may have a lot of insight but no experience in that situation. Similarly, you can have a lot of training that goes to waste because you lack the ability to submit and incorporate it.

BOOKS are a dominant medium of expression for knowledge, education, and entertainment in our time. They are consciousness representations created by energy bodies, with the book style representing the type of energy being portrayed. Much like energy bodies, you can say a book is a book by looking at its structure, and you can tell the contents have been formed in such a way as to express some kind of wisdom. Books, like energy bodies, express realities and distortions based on the craftsmanship that goes into their development. Books, like energy bodies, embody and create worlds large and small and for good or bad by concentrating thinking, emotion, and action.

And, just like energy bodies, no single book, or even a series of books, can provide everything that is learned about any given topic. However, books, like energy bodies, have the ability to bind you to infinity.

This book is the result of combining Toltec theory with a number of science and academic disciplines, exposing the structure and functions of the energy body while also providing a basis for a better understanding of perception and personal development. What is learned is not negated by these modern views on creativity, intellect, and memory. They increase understanding in the same way as new ideas, habits, and innovations are stimulated by disruptive technology. The overriding principle of this project is that what happens within the energy body is the primary determinant of all we see, experience, think, or interpret. While the power, resilience, and importance of the ancient Toltec tradition inform this debate, the additional references to current fields of inquiry reinforce and lead the basic concept into modern meaning.

The scope of this project necessitates a scientific rendering that accurately reflects the mechanics of the energy body and related science. This approach has a reason since it is necessary to present the rationale of how the energy body functions and how to help it reach its full potential. It won't stop you from waking your energy body if you don't understand the complex specifics. The first step is to get a grasp of the situation, and to do so, you just need to be aware of your choices.

The options are essentially the same as those that arise from studying the myriad structures that make up the human body. You'll notice that the dynamics of the nervous system and the energy body, for example, mirror each other.

Historical and contemporary studies collide, exposing more than previously believed while expanding the possibilities. The fact that energy body processes can be linked to a variety of fields backs up the idea that experience is determined by factors within the energy body. In the other hand, these fields of research stem from the energy body, which focuses and generates awareness. Each essay serves as a stepping stone toward a greater understanding of our natural heritage, as well as how to cultivate proficiency in the care and maintenance of your energy body.

The intricacies of projecting, the interplay of learning and creativity, the foundation of fundamentalism, the importance of altered states of consciousness, and how to groom present-centeredness are just a few of the topics discussed herein using this technique. 




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Shamanism, Logic and Lessons in Truth

 



This one, among others, is an important part of the overall project. When it comes to interacting with energy bodies, all forces, both internal and external, are crucial. Each segment can be seen as a part of learning and using your energy body in this way. When you grow consciousness, you can refer to a bit or a chunk of your experience at any given time. There is no set order in which things must happen; there is no set order in which things must happen first or last. The intertwining string of infinity, on the other hand, connects each of the shamanism's segments.

We've developed a sound, a leading signal that will lead us down a clear path to our destination. It is, though, a blueprint that reflects and determines what is to come. We examine an area where science and metaphysics collide, where a change in our perception of reality is taking place, and which provides insight to further the validity of the energy body's presence and effect.

The book "Anatomy of the Energy Body" goes on to describe the parts of our expanded selves as well as their visual capacity. It also gives an explanation of how thoughts construct the bits and pieces of everyday life's reality, as well as how emotions tie this tapestry together. These reference points, when applied to a person, a collective, or a community, may either direct us to freedom or mercilessly constrain us. “The Formation of Truth” provides insights into how models of reality are dynamically formed, encapsulating our understanding of the universe and thereby providing us a world to view, to help you understand and command this mechanism. This demonstrates how truth emerges from infinity in this way. “Expanding the Boundaries” describes energy body mechanisms in such a manner that it can be used to explore states of consciousness outside of group consensus, thus expanding the zone of agreed reality.

It's possible that your convictions will be tested along the way. Suspension of belief is central to the scientific process, Eastern mysticism, in which the universe is seen as an illusion, and Western Toltec thought, in which the reality (any world) is seen as one of several real possibilities. The soul of objectivity is this perceptual transition.

You can think of and even create new orders of truth by learning to control your convictions. This renews and invigorates your life in and of itself, which is why “Stockroom of a Thousand Mirrors” delves further into truth construction.

In “Closing in on Fundamentalism,” we look at some of the stifling impact of our views of truth on learning.

Fundamentalist actions can affect everyone, and this can not be forgotten. Whether or not you believe in the nature of free will, you will discover that the creation of truth is indeed an involved phase in nature. “Building a Creative Life” then offers viewpoints to help you boost your energy and actively shape your reality, as well as get a better understanding of the levels of development you can expect and their inherent obstacles to increased consciousness.

“Living the Unfolding Moment” examines the ultimate outcome of energy body growth. It's about life's immediacy, where personal consciousness collides with infinity.

We are largely unaware of this relation, despite the fact that it exists. Living in the present moment is a condition of being, a state of satisfaction, awareness, and grace, and it represents quintessential human intellect—ontological intelligence. The distinction between academic and ontological understanding can be seen in the ability to speak about and intellectually understand a talent vs the ability to do, observe, and practice that skill. All of the classic mysticisms, in my opinion, approach being and, as a result, reflect on the natural human condition. What differs between them is how they go about getting this to light.

By now, you should have a good sense of the sound of this novel. “Energy Management Skills,” on the other hand, gives you more opportunities to explore your energy body. You may or may not share aspects of the subsequent interactions with others, and they may or may not be entirely contextual. In any case, this prepares you to make sense of them in a broader context, enhancing your attention, allowing you to explore your creativity, and speeding up your learning. We aim to examine the core components of learning—memory, intellect, objectivity, and self-guidance—and concludes with a learning posture that will hold you alert no matter what time, location, or situation you find yourself in. After all, it's all about learning when it comes to awakening your spirit body.

The Goal and the Way

When all is said and done, the aim of this essayis to give you the context and tools you need to improve your awareness skills so that you can revitalize your life on a regular basis, contributing immeasurably to what that entails for both individuals and communities. This is accomplished by imagination and learning, with meaning serving as a navigational guide. Seeking the energized moment of an energized truth is the key to truly understanding this quest; it means fully awakening, to be. This is the position where you can reach infinity.



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Shamanism in a Universe of Energy

 



There have been times in the history of human growth that community consciousness grew and the world became a better place.


The whole universe was turned upside down. These moments have also spanned decades, if not generations, as new ways of seeing the world—viewing it as circular rather than flat, or spinning around the Sun rather than the other way around—have increasingly progressed from concept to widespread recognition to accepted reality.

Reality is "simply" a matter of experience, of putting together an enormous amount of data into a cohesive structure that both awakens and restricts our understanding of the universe. Our perspective on life, like a compass reading, establishes the boundaries of what is considered conceivable. A flight through an ocean to remote places is not feasible for anyone who believes the earth is flat, since it would mean definite death. There isn't even an effort. A worldview that includes the precise passage of celestial bodies, on the other hand, provides for safe navigation through seas and oceans, as well as travel to the moon and back. Daring souls welcome the opportunity to reach above what others claim is impossible in light of new experiences. As a result, others are more likely to join in.

We are living in a watershed period in human history, where the whole earth, including ourselves, is now seen as made of electricity. A quantum physicist will undoubtedly tell you this, and will be able to back it up with all of the necessary statistics and figures. A healer who uses the laying-on of hands, an acupuncturist, or a homoeopath can both say you the same thing, though in somewhat different ways depending on their experience. A typical biologist or medical doctor who is now on the cutting edge of his or her field may still see the world in these words.

The implications of this paradigm change are unfathomable at this time. It will usher in new psychological, health, ecological, industry, and technological paradigms. All fields of human endeavor will be transformed, as a complete reassessment of realities and possibilities will be required. The ramifications of this new worldview alone for health and recovery are enormous. A review of the different facets of the improvements that will emerge from the realization that we—and the world—are made up primarily of energy is, however, beyond the scope of this essay.

Instead, it focuses on the energy body's anatomy and psychological mechanics. This applies to any situation or way of life and it sets the stage for comprehending shifts in reality on any scale.

The energy body paradigm proposed here serves as a unifying umbrella for all bioenergetic modalities and innovations, as well as a way of addressing personal and group circumstances, such as those related to imagination, fitness, and consciousness. The energy body, as part of our natural nature, not only binds us to our everyday environment, but also defines the full spectrum of our experiences and behaviour. As a result of a significant reorientation of conditions within the energy body, a fundamental change in perceiving truth occurs. This essay's focus on healing demonstrates the inquiry's realistic bottom-line potential.




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Relationship between Shamanism and Bioenergetics

 



Bioenergy is at the heart of a revolutionary new area of study that contends that the universe is made up of living things.


physical artefacts are manifested as a function of this force. The multidisciplinary discipline of bioenergetics is "the study of the movement and transfer of energy in and between living organisms, as well as between living organisms and their environment." It is a branch of biophysics. As the name implies, it is concerned with the intersection of biology (the science of all life) and energy (possibly the fundamental structure of all life). The field where biology and energy collide is vast, well beyond imagination. Bioenergy will form the foundation of an entirely new cosmology because it touches nearly every aspect of human existence and every nook and cranny of our planet.

The term bioenergetics was first described as "a type of psychology focused on the use of kinesthetics and muscle tests to measure energy flow and levels," so the field began with physical anatomy as its foundation. With his book Bioenergetics, physician Alexander Lowen popularized it. More recently, in his book Energy Psychology, psychologist Fred Gallo demonstrates how the field has progressed by disclosing links between perception, energy, and actions, and putting energy movement and blockages at the heart of why disorders occur.

The concept of energy playing a part in the body is well-known. Electrical communication is the central nervous system's primary mode of communication, brain waves are measured in frequency, and energy is at the heart of metabolism. The understanding of the importance of energy in the body is improving. Biophysics developed as a natural product of physicists expanding their study into all fields where energy is involved. Cellular connectivity, neurobiology, and the role of photons and electrons in the human body are among the topics covered by this discipline. Simultaneously, the technological universe is giving birth to technologies that expose and change biologic energy fields, as well as communicate with the matrix of ambient energy.

We are increasingly growing our understanding of the fact that energy fields trigger a vast range of physical phenomena as a result of these forms of investigations. Biophysicist James Oschman points out that DNA's reaction to pulsing magnetic fields has been well established in his seminal book, Energy Medicine: The Scientific Basis. He also discusses the extracellular matrix, which can be seen all over the body, and its complex relationship with energy fields. “Just like hormones and neurotransmitters, this matrix exerts unique and essential effects on cellular dynamics.”

While the word "bioenergetics" is new, it has strong historical roots. Acupuncture, for example, has been used as part of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) for at least, years, with some dating its origins as far back as, years. Acupuncture is based on meridians, which are energy circuits that run across the body. This flow is similar to blood flow through the circulatory system, which must be well regulated for good health. Meridians also serve as a biological connection to qi, or life force. In order to preserve and control the normal flow of electricity, needles are implanted into the skin along the channel paths. Since acupuncture is done with reduced invasiveness, adverse side effects are also minimal—an important factor considering the high frequency with which opioid side effects take their toll.

Chakras are a form of energetic circuit that runs through the body. Chakras are energy centers that run the length of the spine, each of which corresponds to a particular mode of perception. The root chakra, situated at the base of the body, is mostly associated with physicality, while the crown chakra, located at the top of the head, is associated with spirituality. The chakra system, which was created thousands of years ago in Eastern cultures, is used in many laying-on-of-hands rituals, such as Reiki.

Homeopathy is a more recent model of energetic recovery. In, its creator, physician Samuel Hahnemann, wrote the seminal treatise Organon of the Medical Art, in which he defined the method of treating diseases with small quantities of a drug that correlates to the illness, a “like cures like” theory. Physical molecules are steadily separated by succussing, which involves intense shaking of the solution, as well as diluting the solution constantly, until only an energetic residue remains, creating another theory of "less is more." This, according to Hahnemann, potentizes the formulation, which works directly on the patient's "vital power," or intrinsic capacity. The human body reacts and heals as a result of this.

During the infectious disease epidemics that swept Europe in the s, homoeopathy is credited with minimizing pain. As modern models of biology and chemistry became more common toward the end of the century, many people started to dismiss homoeopathy as quackery. The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), which is part of the National Institutes of Health, is also offering grants for the clinical study of homoeopathy, indicating a resurgence of interest in the United States. Homeopathy is regaining prominence in Europe, as shown by centers such as the Paracelsus Clinic in Lustmuhle, Switzerland, which uses homoeopathy as a primary therapy in the treatment of cancer and other diseases from a biological medicine viewpoint.

Royal Rife found a cancer virus in the early s, but medical research did not confirm his discovery until the late s. He went on to discover a peculiar electromagnetic frequency that, when directed at cancer cells, caused them to die, paving the way for further research into the idea that any organism has its own electromagnetic signature or waveform that is linked to its genetic composition. Rife's thesis was contentious to say the least, and several institutions attempted to censor it, but it is still a point of reference in the field of bioenergetics today.

One of the most persuasive features distinguishing all of these treatments from the allopathic biomedical paradigm is that bioenergy-based healing frequently necessitates an assessment of the whole individual and views disease as an expression of internal and external disharmony.

Treatment of the Western allopathic style, on the other hand, is aimed at combating the illness, which is seen as a different entity from the patient. Symptoms are often attacked alone, resulting in negative side effects, while detrimental side effects are deliberately reduced, though not avoided, in holistic models. I'm not claiming that one viewpoint is superior to the other; I believe that both styles have meaning in different situations.

One of the challenges for a developing area like this, as Clark Manning and Louis Vanrenan, authors of Bioenergetic Medicines East and West, point out, is the lack of instrumentation to accurately test effects and outcomes. Because these energy pathways haven't found mainstream recognition in scientific thinking, scientific instruments to quantify chakras, meridians, and related energy processes have been slow to evolve. Chakras are still only spoken in passing, let alone studied scientifically.

While biologists are amassing vast amounts of data on various energetic processes such as cellular signaling, this is in the realm of acknowledged scientific inquiry. Homeopathy and acupuncture, for example, have not been properly measured, tested, or approved by the medical community as a whole. One explanation for the slowdown in technical innovation is the lack of precise descriptions of the energies to be measured.

Energy-based treatments, according to NCCAM, work with two kinds of energy fields: veritable and putative. Visual light, magnetism, and parts of the electromagnetic spectrum are examples of veritable fields that can be tested. Putative fields contain energies like the vital force and qi, which are yet to be measured. However, the lack of instrumentation in CAM-related biofields is being discussed on many fronts.


The SQUID (superconducting quantum information device) is at the forefront of this kind of invention.


Magnetometer (biomagnetic field mapping device) is a highly sensitive technology that can map biomagnetic fields created by physiological processes in the body. J. E. Zimmerman, a former Ford Motor Company scientist, was the driving force behind its growth. SQUID was the first practical electronic device to track interaction between matter's energy waves, and it is now regarded as one of the best magnetic flux detectors. Special rooms shielding environmental energies have been designed in combination with SQUID technologies in order to study highly subtle magnetic fields in the brain and other parts of the body.

Konstantin Korotkov, a physics professor at Russia's St. Petersburg State Technical University, came up with another invention. Korotkov, a bioelectrography specialist, created a computerised device that allows for what he calls "Gas Discharge Visualization" (GDV).

GDV, which is based on Kirlian imaging, allows for the study of human energy fields and can aid in the observation of energy transitions in a number of circumstances, including as treatments are performed.

Polycontrast Interference Photography is another new technique with a lot of potential for diagnosing physical and psychiatric illnesses (PIP). It consists of a digital camera and patented software that measures the energy released as two waveforms collide, and it was invented by British researcher Harry Oldfield. The photonic discharge that results creates an image that reveals areas of illness and fitness. Chakras, meridians, and physiologic states, as well as the effects of human intention and a variety of environmental factors, are all readily discernible. In the United States, Oldfield worked with physician Brian Dailey, and in India, he worked with Thornton Streeter, Director of The Centre for Biofield Sciences. In one study, the crown chakra of a delusional individual was found to be distinctly broken. PIP mapped the changes in a seasoned meditator's consciousness as he went from normal waking consciousness to deep meditation and back to normal waking consciousness in another profile. PIP observations, including GDV experiments, are classified as speculative because it's unclear what energies are being tracked.

The science of metabolic function at the cellular level is also known as bioenergetics. Scientists at prestigious universities are showing the importance of energetic flow and transformation of illness and recovery as a result of this research.

The Institute of Bioenergetics at the University of Colorado in Colorado Springs, for example, is developing “a multidisciplinary approach to studying cellular metabolism and cellular connectivity with the aim of treating or curing severe diseases.” The field of cellular signaling (how cells communicate) is now progressing from the study of physical processes—for example, a hormone docking with a cellular receptor, which sets off a chain of events—to studying energetic signaling, of which the physical cascade's first source is energetic in nature.

In the laboratory of John McMichael, immunologist, virologist, and curator of Beech Tree Labs and The Institute for Therapeutic Discovery, another field of investigation is underway. Decades of laboratory and preclinical research have shown the promise of a class of formulations that use low amounts of naturally occurring molecules—proteins and DNA, for example—to address a broad variety of diseases.

The dosages are much higher than in homoeopathy, but much smaller than in most modern pharmaceuticals.

Scientific evidence indicating the receptors are affected and which genes are up- or down-regulated (turned on or off) suggests that this platform could lead to a new understanding of how the body functions.

Scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill found that McMichael's groundbreaking breakthrough for curing depression didn't work by the biopathways common with modern antidepressants since it showed effectiveness in confirmed animal tests. These results led to the hypothesis that the agent works by a process of energetic contact that instructs the body to rebalance itself. McMichael himself believes there may be an energetic network made up of receptors in cells or the extracellular matrix that aids in the restoration of homeodynamics (a more descriptive term for homeostasis), the body's normal balance. As a result, he now concentrates his focus on sub-molecular processes.

Nonlocal healing, in which an individual's or a group's well-focused purpose can have a huge impact on the wellbeing of anyone thousands of miles away, is often on the cutting edge of bioenergetics. Although this process is often classified as mystical or religious, the cause of nonlocal healing is generally thought to be energy-based, whether it is focused by dowsing, praying, or other methods. Physician Larry Dossey and research scientist Marilyn Mandala Schlitz of the Institute of Noetic Sciences are among those who have studied this mechanism of healing scientifically. They have found positive yet contradictory findings, as is typical when studying putative energies. The common denominator of how the different approaches to nonlocal healing concentrate energy is often considered to be intentionality, or the deliberate application of meaning. The scientific mapping of intent is still a long way off.

If healing rituals and hardwired technologies—which get to the heart of the human condition—are energy effects that necessitate looking at the whole being as well as environmental factors, both the quantum physicist's "unified field" and the mystic's "everything is one" insight point to a shared universe. This takes us closer to the aspects of the human condition that are universal, regardless of colour, gender, or creed. Although there has been a lot of literature on the energetics of living environments, it hasn't been presented in the light of Western European philosophical ideas and traditions for the most part. This is beginning to change. For decades, science has been catching up to what the Toltecs have been telling about the universe and the healing methods TCM has been providing. The healing therapies of bioenergetics—often referred to as "energy medicine"—appears to be very complex, have strong historical origins, and constitute an emerging multidisciplinary field of modern science.

New models, new factors for investigation, and new tools for healing and wellness will continue to sprout whether energy is in any sense a determinant for biological behavior and reactions. These revelations, on the other hand, do not throw a completely new net of knowledge over the science community. They are predicated on prior experience. According to Oschman, “the new hypotheses should not cause us to forget our sophisticated understandings of genetics, biochemistry, or molecular biology.”

“Instead, they refine our understanding of living systems and healing at deeper structural and functional levels.”

Magnetic electrical input and other forms of energy-based signals are continuously received and emitted by the human body. The body has an array of energy-detection apparatuses, from drawing in the Sun's energy and turning it to Vitamin D, to hearing impacting brain areas, to photon-detection receptors in the retina. Chemical reactions are triggered by the presence of electricity. Furthermore, the modern discipline of electromyography, which tracks electrical currents behind muscle contraction, has over a century of study behind it, demonstrating that this form of action happens spontaneously within the body.

“We are in a time of radical transition in the healthcare system,” says Oschman, a recognized pioneer in the area of biophysics. In this phase, Energy Medicine plays a critical role. The explanation for this is that traditional Western medicine is the first medicinal practice in existence to have largely overlooked the concept of energy. Nearly all complementary and holistic therapies that the population is enthusiastically turning toward have energetic concepts.” “‘In every society and in every medical practice before ours, healing was done by transferring energy,” Oschman continues, quoting Albert Szent-Györgyi (who received a Nobel Prize in for his synthesis of vitamin C).

“Nothing occurs in nature without an energy exchange,” says physicist Milo Wolff. Communication or the development of some sort of information requires an energetic transition. There are no exceptions to this rule. This is a natural law.”



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