Showing posts with label Dakshinachara. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Dakshinachara. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is Right Hand Tantra Or Dakshinachara?

 

Right Hand Tantra is the name for a form of tantra, which is a hidden, ritual-based religious practice.

Certain tantric ceremonies include generally banned items, such as wine and nonvegetarian food, in an attempt to integrate the universe by eradicating all conceptual dualities, including the one between holy and forbidden.

In "left hand" (vamachara) tantric ritual, these drugs are employed in their natural forms, but in "right hand" (dakshinachara) tantric ritual, they are substituted.

See dakshinachara for further information.


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Hinduism - What Is A Mudra (Intoxicants)?

 

Mudra is fermented or parched grain .

Fermented grain is the fourth of the "Five Forbidden Things" (panchamakara) in the secret ritual-based religious practice known as tantra.

In "left hand" (vamachara) tantric ritual, they are used in their actual forms, whereas in "right hand" (dakshinachara) tantric ritual, they are represented by symbolic substitutes.

Although fermented grain has toxicating properties, it is also said to be an aphrodisiac.

The use of intoxicants and/or sexual license is fiercely condemned in "respectable" Hindu culture.

As a result, the tantric usage of this chemical must be seen in context.

The ultimate oneness of everything that exists is one of the most widespread tantric conceptions.

To proclaim that the whole cosmos is one principle from a tantric viewpoint implies that the adept must reject all dualistic conceptions.

The "Five Forbidden Things" serve as a ritual for dismantling dualism.

In this ritual, the adept defies society norms by consuming intoxicants, eating nonvegetarian cuisine, and engaging in unlawful sexual activity in an attempt to sacralize what is generally banned.

Tantric adepts point to the ceremonial usage of banned objects as evidence that their practice entails a higher level of exclusivity (adhikara) and is therefore superior to ordinary practice.

See Arthur Avalon's (Sir John Woodroffe's) Shakti and Shakta, 1978; Swami Agehananda Bharati's The Tantric Tradition, 1977; and Douglas Renfrew Brooks' The Secret of the Three Cities, 1990, for further details.


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Hinduism - What Is Dakshinachara In Tantra?


("exercise with your right hand") This is the word for a sort of tantric practice that does not use any banned drugs or encourage any conduct that the orthodox would deem scandalous or unacceptable in the hidden ritual tradition known as tantra. 

It contrasts with the vamachara, or "left hand practice," which employs prohibited chemicals in its ritual and has little respect for traditional sensitivities. 

Madya (wine), matsya (fish), mamsa (meat), mudra (fermented or parched grain), and maithuna (copulation) are the five prohibited things (panchamakara), so named because they all begin with the letter "m" (in the ancient Sanskrit language, makara). 

These forbidden substances are employed in their original forms by left-hand tantra practitioners, whilst right-hand tantra practitioners substitute other more socially acceptable things for them. 

This is another another example of Hinduism's widespread right-left polarity, which contains implicit value judgements. 

Left-hand practitioners are considered as dirty and dangerous in this situation because they deliberately breach social boundaries, while right-hand practitioners are socially acceptable. 

See Arthur Avalon's (Sir John Woodroffe's) Shakti and Shakta, 1978; Swami Agehananda Bharati's The Tantric Tradition, 1977; and Douglas Renfrew Brooks' The Secret of the Three Cities, 1990 for further details. 



You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.