Showing posts with label Danda. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Danda. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is Rajadharma?


The "king's dharma," or religious responsibility, that fell to him (or, considerably more rarely, to her) as a result of his position as monarch.

This idea arose from the dharma literature's belief that each person had a distinct function to perform in society, one that supported societal stability while also bringing individual satisfaction.

The king's most fundamental responsibility was to keep the kingdom in order, since this allowed everyone else to perform their own religious obligations (svadharma).

The dharma literature views preserving order as primarily a matter of imposing punishment (danda), with the goal of removing some bad actors and scaring the remainder into good conduct.

If the monarch was successful in maintaining social order, he was free to do what he wanted, with the caveat that taxes should not be too high, since this would be costly to the people.

Aside from that, the Indian kingship notion was primarily pragmatic.


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Hinduism - What Is Danda?

 

(“stick”) In Hindu tradition, it is a sign of authority. 

On the one hand, this stick symbolized royal power and was visible as a scepter or mace, but it was also symbolic of the king's responsibility to preserve social order by punishing evildoers. 

In old Indian conceptions of monarchy, the king's job and responsibility was to govern by punishment (dandaniti), since regular social life would be impossible without it. 

The staff may be a sign of austere authority in a different setting. 

The ascetics with the greatest position among the Dashanami Sanyasis, a group of ascetics who are devotees (bhakta) of the deity Shiva, wear a staff as a symbol of their power and are known as Dandi Sanyasis. 





You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.