Showing posts with label Kama. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Kama. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is Purushartha In Hindu Culture?


 The four aims of life are: worldly prosperity and power (artha), pleasure (kama), religious obligation (dharma), and ultimate liberation (moksha).

In traditional Hindu culture, all of these were considered respectable aspirations.

Also look up Hindu 'Aims of Life'.


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Hinduism - What Is Moksha In Hindu Spirituality?


Moksha is one of the four purusharthas, or life goals, in Indian philosophy; the others are artha (money, power, and success), kama (desire), and dharma (proper action) (righteousness).

The ultimate liberation of the human soul (atman) from the cycle of reincarnation is known as moksha (samsara).

Questioning and eventually distancing oneself from regular social interests is part of the search for liberation.

Despite the fact that all four purusharthas are lawful and sanctioned, emancipation is often seen as the final aim, the last objective to be achieved after the other three's joys and pains have been satisfied.

Moksha is likewise permanent, offering complete and perfect liberation, while the other three are transient since they are sought in the ever-changing world of wants.

The eleventh day (ekadashi) of the bright half of Margashirsha (November–December) is celebrated as #

Mokshada Ekadashi is devoted to Vishnu, as are other eleventh-day observances.

Most Hindu holidays have mandated ceremonies, which generally include fasting (upavasa) and devotion, and frequently promise particular rewards if performed faithfully.

The soul is said to get ultimate emancipation (moksha) if this festival is faithfully observed.


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Hinduism - What Is Kama Among The Purusharthas?


One of the four purusharthas, or life goals, in Indian philosophy, the others being artha (money, power, and success), dharma (righteousness), and moksha (liberation) (libera tion).

Kama's most fundamental definition is "desire," with undertones of sexual desire, but it may also apply to many kinds of attraction, including aesthetic enjoyment from the arts.

The Kama Sutra, which addresses the gratification of sexual cravings, is the most renowned treatise on the fulfillment of kama.

Desires and their fulfillment are accepted as a natural, acceptable component of life when pursued within the confines of good behavior, or dharma.

The pursuit for pleasure becomes improper and disruptive when this regulating factor is lacking. 



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Hinduism - Who Is Kama In The Hindu Pantheon?


Kama is a minor deity who is the personification of the word kama ("desire").

Kama is akin to the Greek god Eros in that he is in charge of sparking human sexual attraction and sensuous desire.

Kama is shown as a young guy astride a parrot and wielding a bow and arrows.

His five arrows are five different flowers, each bringing a different emotional effect to the person it pierces.

The bow is a stalk of sugar cane, the bowstring a line of buzzing bees, and his five arrows are five different flowers, each bringing a different emotional effect to the person it pierces.

Lotus, infatuation; ashoka, intoxication (with love); mango, tiredness; jasmine, pining; blue lotus, paralysis are the five flowers and feelings.

The spring season (personified as another minor deity, Vasant) is seen as Kama's friend and ally in awakening desire through the regeneration of the natural world and the showy display of spring blossoms, and the spring season (personified as another minor deity, Vasant) is perceived as Kama's friend and ally in awakening desire through the regeneration of the natural world and the showy display of spring blossoms.

The most famous tale in Kama's mythology starts with the rise to power of Taraka, a demon that can only be defeated by a Shiva son.

Shiva has no sons and is in profound meditation, lamenting the loss of his wife Sati, therefore Taraka seems hard to overcome.

The other gods implore Kama to strike Shiva with a desire arrow so that he might marry Parvati and have a son.

Shiva is approached by Kama, who shoots him with an arrow.

When Shiva discovers who has interrupted his meditation, he fires a jet of fire from his third eye in the centre of his forehead, instantaneously consuming Kama.

Kama is eventually brought back to life by Shiva's mercy.

Because to the loss of his body, one of Kama's epithets or other titles is Ananga, which means "bodiless" (and the fact that desire seems to strike in unseen ways).

Despite being destroyed by Shiva and seeming to be defeated, Kama succeeds in achieving his aim.

His effort to rouse Shiva from his medita tion is successful, and Shiva marries Parvati.

Wendy Doniger O'Flaherty, Siva, 1981, has further information on Shiva and Kama's relationship. 


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.