Showing posts with label Jnanamarga. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Jnanamarga. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is Karmamarga? What Are The Karmendriya In Hindu Philosophy?

 


Karmamarga ("path of action") is a Sanskrit word that means "path of activity." Along with the Path of Devotion (bhakti marga) and the Path of Wisdom, it is one of Hinduism's three commonly recognized pathways to eventual soul liberation (moksha) (jnana marga).

The bhaktimarga emphasizes devotion to God, whereas the jnanamarga emphasizes the realization of one's particular Self (atman) and Ultimate Reality (Brahman).

Karmamarga promotes altruistic deeds done for the good of others.

 ("action organ") Karmendriya are any of the five organs by which human beings operate on their environment, usually regarded to be the voice, hands, feet, and elimination and generation organs in Indian philosophy. 

 

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Hinduism - What Is The Jnanamarga?


 ("Realization Path") Along with the Path of Devotion (bhaktimarga) and the Path of Action (karmamarga), this is one of Hinduism's three commonly acknowledged routes to eventual soul liberation.

The jnanamarga emphasizes realizing the ultimate identity of one's own Self (atman) and Ultimate Reality, while the bhaktimarga promotes love to God and the karmamarga emphasizes selfless activity in the world (Brahman).

This discovery is sometimes characterized as a "flash of insight" that may take years to achieve yet significantly changes one's outlook on the world.

 


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Hinduism - What Does Jnana Mean In Hindu Philosophy?

 

 A term that has distinct connotations in different settings in Indian philosophical philosophy.

The term jnana comes from the verb "to know," and one of its meanings is "consciousness," at least in a perceptual sense.

In a more abstract sense, it represents what it is to genuinely "know" something; the jnanamarga is one of the ways to soul liberation stated in the Bhagavad Gita, alongside the karmamarga and the bhaktimarga.

In this case, "wisdom" or "realization" could be a better translation, since this isn't the kind of "knowledge" that comes from reading a book or getting instruction, but rather from deep understanding achieved through considerable effort.


 


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Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.